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Access 

National 
Parks 



A Guide for Handicapped Visitors 



National Park Service 

U.S. Department of the Interior 

Washington, DC. 

1978 



Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data 

United States. National Park Service 
Access national parks. 

1 . National parks and reserves— United States — 
Guide-books. 2. Handicapped — Recreation. I. Title. 
E160.U644 1977 917.3'04'9260240816 77-608256 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, 
U.S. Government Printing Office, 
Washington, DC 20402 " 
Stock Number 024-005-00691-5 



IV 



Foreword 



"Access National Parks" is a handbook of accessibility for handi- 
capped visitors to the National Park System. It is, also, a milepost for the 
Department of the Interior and the National Park Service. It shows evi- 
dence of substantial progress made toward our goal of providing bene- 
ficial, comfortable and enjoyable park visits for everyone. 

The national parks of the United States are a wondrous treasury of 
history and nature. As we all share the ownership and future of this 
national birthright, so should we all have the opportunity to enjoy and to 
draw strength and identity from the mountain wilderness, the wild rivers 
and seashores, the citadels, battlegrounds, the places where our history 
was shaped, the homes of historic and prehistoric Americans, and the 
natural areas of desert, swamp, forest and island. 

The national parks — urban and remote — with their diversity of 
historic shrines, wilderness, recreation areas, the centers of art dis- 
played and performed, should be fully accessible for the participation, 
growth and enjoyment of all. 

In his address to the first White House Conference on Handicapped 
Individuals on May 23 of last year, President Carter added a new dimen- 
sion to his fight for "human rights." He said "The time for discrimination 
against the handicapped in the United States is over . . . [The law and 
regulations] require that when programs are made available to the 
public, those programs are made available to the handicapped public . . . 
It is almost inconceivable . . . that these basic rights have been delayed so 
long. These are not times for thanksgiving, but for a sustained demand 
and a time to assess other opportunities in the future." 

We have been challenged to assess our progress and to discover 
opportunities for improvement in the future. I pledge the best efforts of 
the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service to work 
toward that goal, and I invite all visitors to the national parks to aid us by 
sending suggestions for improvements of facilities and programs. 



Cecil D. Andrus 
Secretary of the Interior 
January 1978 



Introduction 



Eminent outdoorsman and writer Sigurd E. Olson, in speaking 
about the nature and work of the National Park Service, said: 

". . . Important though practice may be and inevitable as problems 
may be, in the back of all this is a feeling of humanitananism . . . a 
philosophy. We're dealing with people and with people's happi- 
ness, we 're dealing with people 's needs. " 

We have attempted to reflect this philosophy in the newest edition 
of a handbook designed for handicapped visitors to the National Park 
System, "Access National Parks." 

At some stage in life, almost every person may experience a "con- 
dition" that could be classified as handicapping. One who appears 
healthy at sea level may very well find unbearable the thin air at mile-high 
altitudes — a difficulty many persons with heart and respiratory conditions 
encounter. An arm or a leg in a cast is a handicap, obviously. Many 
persons must live permanently with similar handicaps. 

Physical barriers and the equally frustrating barriers to full under- 
standing found in one-dimensional educational programs can prevent a 
person from fully enjoying a park and its resources. In planning this 
handbook we have tried to show where these obstacles have been 
eliminated and where they still exist. And in our review of them, we have 
also learned of many that can and will be easily corrected and of others 
that can be corrected in future planning. 

The National Parks are for all people. We hope that this book will 
be a useful tool to improve visits to your national parks. 



William I. Whalen 

Director 

National Park Service 



vn 



General Information 



"Access National Parks" details information about accessibility of 
facilities, services and interpretive programs in almost 300 areas of the 
National Park System. A few general comments and suggestions are 
included here to supplement the detailed information, 



Planning Itineraries 

Most people plan trips by geographical regions for best utilization 
of available time. Included, at the back of the book, are maps of the 
National Park System according to the National Park Service regional 
structure, such as North Atlantic, Midwest and Rocky Mountain. All 
parks within the regions are named and located on the maps. The list of 
regional offices, with their addresses and telephone numbers, is also 
provided in that section. When the reader has selected parks found to be 
of interest and accessible, printed materials, maps and other general 
information may be obtained from the regional offices that administer 
the parks chosen. 

Mailing addresses are listed in the park headings. A few are quite 
a distance from the parks. For this reason, specific directions for reach- 
ing the parks are provided. Telephone numbers for general information 
and directions, accessible, alternative transportation and other services 
or facilities, are listed for all parks. Special telephone numbers are 
given for reservations of accessible lodgings, ticket reservations and for 
advance arrangements for assistance or special guided tours, open 
hours and seasons. In cases where the parks do not have accessible 
restaurants and lodgings, the nearest general locations of these services 
are noted. 

Many parks are "fee" areas. Specific information about these areas, 
and about their fees for entrance, camping, parking, and other special 
services should be requested from the appropriate regional office or park. 

The Golden Eagle Passport, an annual entry permit, is available for 
$10 at any regional office, any "fee" area, or National Park Service 
headquarters in Washington, DC 

A free, lifetime, Golden Age Passport is also available at any of these 
offices, for citizens or permanent residents of the United States, 62 years 



vm 



of age or older, upon submission of proof of age. Detailed information 
about the Passports should be obtained from the appropriate regional 
offices. 

Few areas restrict seeing-eye dogs, and these are only where safety 
requires such restrictions. Details about such restrictions can be obtained 
from regional offices. 

Medical Considerations 

In every case where altitude is a consideration, both high points 
and average elevations of roads over which visitors must travel are noted. 
In this connection, every park at high elevation, and most, at all eleva- 
tions, have available oxygen and first aid equipment with personnel 
trained in administration. Some parks have clinics staffed by doctors 
and nurses, some have hospitals within their boundaries. Many parks 
have wheelchairs, some electric and some equipped with pneumatic 
tires, for emergency purposes, or for non-emergency use on a temporary 
basis. In all cases, where appropriate — principally in remote areas — the 
nearest full range of medical services is noted. In urban and near-urban 
parks, park personnel can provide such information and assist as needed. 

Interpretive and Special Programs 

Wherever parks have "senses" trails, or where such trails are 
planned, they are described. By increasing acuteness of the senses of 
hearing, smelling, tasting and touching, a new dimension is added to the 
enjoyment and understanding of the special features of the parks for all 
visitors. The same is true of improved exhibits including models, 
materials, artifacts and contour maps. 

Many parks now have interpreters capable of communicating with 
visitors through sign language. The Service is attempting to expand this 
service through training courses and accelerated employment of per- 
sons skilled in this form of communication. 

Evaluation of Program and Facilities 

Your comments, criticisms and suggestions would be helpful to 
the National Park Service. If you find the book useful, if you encounter 
difficulties or errors of fact, and if you have suggestions for improvement 
of services and programs, please send your comments to the address 
given on page 197. 



IX 



Key to Sites 



Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site, Ky. 67 

(See also Ford's Theatre; Lincoln) 

Acadia National Park, Maine 70 

Adams National Historic Site, Mass. 8 1 

Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, Nebr. 98 
Alcatraz Island, Calif. (See Golden Gate NBA) 
Alibates Flint Quarries and Texas Panhandle Pueblo Culture National 

Monument, Tex. 153 

Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, Pa. 1 32 

Amistad National Recreation Area, Tex. 1 53 

Anacostia Park, D.C. 72 

Andersonville National Historic Site, Ga. 54 

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site, Tenn. 149 

Antietam National Battlefield Site, Md. 72 

Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wis. 183 
Appalachian National Scenic Trail, Maine-N.H.-Vt. -Mass. -Conn. -N.Y.- 

N.J.-Pa.-Md.-W. Va.-Va.-Tenn.-N.C.-Ga. 70 

Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, Va. 1 66 

Arches National Park, Utah 1 59 

Arkansas Post National Memorial, Ark. 1 8 

Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, Va. 1 66 

Assateague Island National Seashore, Md-Va. 73 

Aztec Ruins National Monument, N. Mex. 105 



Badlands National Monument, S. Dak. 146 

Bandelier National Monument, N. Mex. 105 
Barton, Clara (See Clara Barton) 

Benjamin Franklin National Memorial, Pa. 1 34 

(See also Independence NHB) 

Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site, Colo. 3 1 

Big Bend National Park, Tex. 1 53 

Big Cypress National Preserve, Fla. 47 

Big Hole National Battlefield, Mont. 95 

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Mont.-Wyo. 95 



Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Ky.-Tenn. 149 

Big Thicket National Preserve, Tex. 1 54 

Biscayne National Monument, Fla. 47 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument, Colo. 3 1 

Blue Ridge Parkway, N.C.-Va. 1 1 8 

Booker T. Washington National Monument, Va. 167 

(See also Tuskegee Institute NHS) 

Boston National Historical Park, Mass. 8 1 
Breezy Point Unit, N.Y. (See Gateway National Recreation Area) 

Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site, Miss. 91 

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah 1 59 

Buck Island Reef National Monument, V.I. 175 

Buffalo National River, Ark. 1 8 
Bunker Hill, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 



Cabrillo National Monument, Calif. 2 1 

Canaveral National Seashore, Fla. 47 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Ariz. 7 

Canyonlands National Park, Utah 1 60 
Cape Canaveral, Fla. (See Canaveral NS) 

Cape Cod National Seashore, Mass. 83 

Cape Hatteras National Seashore, N.C. 1 19 
Cape Henry Memorial, Va. (See Colonial NHP) 

Cape Lookout National Seashore, N.C. 1 20 

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah 1 60 

Capulin Mountain National Monument, N. Mex. 106 

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, N.C. 120 

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, N. Mex. 1 06 
Carver, George Washington (See George Washington Carver; 

Tuskegee Institute NHS) 

Casa Grande National Monument, Ariz. 7 

Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, Fla. 48 

Castle Clinton National Monument, N.Y. 1 1 1 

Catoctin Mountain Park, Md. 74 

Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah 161 

Chaco Canyon National Monument, N. Mex. 107 

Chalmette National Historical Park, La. 69 

Chamizal National Memorial, Tex. 1 54 

Channel Islands National Monument, Calif. 2 1 
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Md.-D.C- 

W. Va. 75 
Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Ga.-Tenn. 54 

Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Okla. 1 28 

Chimney Rock National Historic Site, Nebr. 98 

Chiricahua National Monument, Ariz. 8 

Christiansted National Historic Site, V.I. 175 

City of Refuge National Historical Park, Hawaii 58 



XI 



Clara Barton National Historic Site, Md. 75 
Clark, George Rogers (See George Rogers Clark) 

Colonial National Historical Park, Va. 1 67 

Colorado National Monument, Colo. 31 

Congaree Swamp National Monument, S.C. 143 

Coronado National Memorial, Ariz. 8 

Coulee Dam National Recreation Area, Wash. 177 

Cowpens National Battlefield Site, S.C. 1 43 

Crater Lake National Park, Oreg. 1 29 

Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho 6 1 

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, Ky-Va.-Tenn. 67 

Cumberland Island National Seashore, Ga. 55 
Cumberland River, Ky.-Tenn. (See Big South Fork National River) 

and Recreation Area) 

Curecanti National Recreation Area, Colo. 32 

Custer Battlefield National Monument, Mont. 96 

Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area, Ohio 1 26 



Death Valley National Monument, Calif .-Nev. 2 1 

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, NJ.-Pa. 1 32 

De Soto National Memorial, Fla. 49 

Devils Postpile National Monument, Calif. 22 

Devils Tower National Monument, Wyo. 1 85 

Dinosaur National Monument, Colo-Utah 32 
Douglass, Frederick (See Frederick Douglass) 



Edison National Historic Site, N.J. 103 

Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa 65 

Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, N.Y. Ill 
Ellis Island, N.J. (See Statue of Liberty NM) 

El Morro National Monument, N. Mex. 1 07 

Everglades National Park, Fla. 49 



Faneuil Hall, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

Federal Hall National Memorial, N.Y. 1 1 1 

Fire Island National Seashore, N.Y. 112 

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, Colo. 33 

Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, D.C. 37 

Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Ariz. 9 

Fort Caroline National Memorial, Fla. 50 

Fort Clatsop National Memorial, Oreg. 1 30 

Fort Davis National Historic Site, Tex. 1 55 

Fort Donelson National Military Park, Tenn. 1 50 

Fort Dupont Park and Activity Center, D.C. 38 

Fort Fredenca National Monument, Ga. 55 



xn 



Fort Jefferson National Monument, Fla. 50 

Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Wyo. 1 85 

Fort Larned National Historic Site, Kans. 66 

Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine, Md. 76 

Fort Matanzas National Monument, Fla. 5 1 
Fort Moultrie, S.C. (See Fort Sumter NM) 

Fort Necessity National Battlefield, Pa. 133 
Fort Pickens, Fla. (See Gulf Islands NS) 

Fort Point National Historic Site, Calif. 22 

Fort Pulaski National Monument, Ga. 56 

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, N.C. 121 

Fort Scott Historic Area, Kans. 66 

Fort Smith National Historic Site, Ark.-Okla. 1 9 

Fort Stanwix National Monument, N.Y. 1 12 

Fort Sumter National Monument, S.C. 143 

Fort Union National Monument, N . Mex . 1 08 

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, N. Dak-Mont. 1 24 

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Wash. 177 

Fort Washington Park, Md. 76 

Fossil Butte National Monument, Wyo. 1 86 
Franklin, Benjamin (See Benjamin Franklin; Independence NHP) 

Frederick Douglass Home, D.C. 38 
Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields Memorial 

National Military Park, Va. 1 68 



Gateway Arch, St. Louis, Mo. (See Jefferson National Expansion 

Memorial NHS) 

Gateway National Recreation Area, N.Y.-N.J. 1 1 3 
General Grant Grove, Calif. (See Kings Canyon NP) 

General Grant National Memorial, N.Y. 114 

George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, Ind. 63 

George Washington Birthplace National Monument, Va. 1 69 

George Washington Carver National Monument, Mo. 93 

George Washington Memorial Parkway, Va.-Md. 1 69 

Gettysburg National Military Park, Pa. 1 33 

Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, N. Mex. 1 08 

Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska 3 

Glacier National Park, Mont. 96 

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Utah- Ariz. 1 62 

Glen Echo Park, Md. 77 

Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church National Historic Site, Pa. 1 36 

Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Calif. 23 

Golden Spike National Historic Site, Utah 1 6 1 

Grand Canyon National Park, Ariz. 9 

Grand Portage National Monument, Minn. 89 

Grand Teton National Park, Wyo. 1 86 

Gran Quivira National Monument, N. Mex. 109 



xm 



Grant, U. S. (See General Grant NM) 

Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site, Mont. 97 

Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colo. 33 

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, N.C.-Tenn. 1 50 

Greenbelt Park, Md. 78 

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Tex. 1 55 

Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, N.C. 121 

Gulf Islands National Seashore, Fla.-Miss. 52 



Haleakala National Park, Hawaii 58 
Hamilton, Alexander (See Hamilton Grange) 

Hamilton Grange National Memorial, N.Y. 114 

Hampton National Historic Site, Md. 78 

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Md.-W. Va. 182 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii 59 

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, Iowa 65 

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site, N.Y. 1 14 

Homestead National Monument of America, Nebr. 98 
Hoover, Herbert (See Herbert Hoover) 

Hopewell Village National Historic Site, Pa. 1 33 

Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, Ala. 1 

Hot Springs National Park, Ark. 1 9 

Hovenweep National Monument, Colo. -Utah 34 

Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site, Ariz. 1 



Ice Age National Scientific Reserve, Wis. 1 83 

Independence National Historical Park. Pa. 1 34 

Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Ind. 63 

International Peace Garden, N. Dak. 124 

Isle Royale National Park, Mich. 87 



Jamaica Bay Unit, N.Y. (See Gateway National Recreation Area) 

Jamestown National Historic Site, Va. 170 
Jefferson Memorial, D.C. (See Thomas Jefferson Memorial) 
Jefferson National Expansion Memorial National Historic Site, Mo. 93 

Jewel Cave National Monument, S. Dak. 146 

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Ore. 1 30 

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, D.C. 39 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site, Mass. 83 

John Muir National Historic Site, Calif. 24 
Johnson, Andrew (See Andrew Johnson) 
Johnson, L. B. (See Lyndon B. Johnson) 

Johnstown Flood National Memorial, Pa. 140 

Joshua Tree National Monument, Calif. 24 



xiv 



Katmai National Monument, Alaska 3 

Kennedy Center, D.C. (See John F. Kennedy Center) 
Kennedy, J. F. (See John Fitzgerald Kennedy) 

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, Ga. 56 

Kings Canyon National Park, Calif. 24 

Kings Mountain National Military Park, S.C. 144 

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Alaska- Wash. 4 

Kosciuszko, Thaddeus (See Thaddeus Kosciuszko) 



Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, Wash. 179 

Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Ariz.-Nev. 1 00 

Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, Tex. 1 56 

Lassen Volcanic National Park, Calif. 25 

Lava Beds National Monument, Calif. 26 

Lee, Robert E. (See Arlington House) 

Lehman Caves National Monument, Nev. 1 00 

Liberty Bell, Philadelphia, Pa. (See Independence NHP) 

Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, Ind. 63 

Lincoln Home National Historic Site, 111. 62 

Lincoln Memorial, D.C. 39 

(See also Abraham Lincoln; Ford's Theatre) 

Longfellow National Historic Site, Mass. 84 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (See Chickamauga and Chattanooga NMP) 

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Site, Tex. 1 56 

Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac, D.C. 40 



McLoughlin House National Historic Site, Oreg. 1 30 

Mammoth Cave National Park, Ky. 68 

Manassas National Battlefield Park, Va. 1 70 

Martin Van Buren National Historic Site, N.Y. 115 
Meriwether Lewis Park, Tenn. (See Natchez Trace Parkway) 

Mesa Verde National Park, Colo. 34 

Minute Man National Historical Park, Mass. 84 

Monocacy National Battlefield, Md. 79 

Montezuma Castle National Monument, Ariz. 1 1 

Moores Creek National Military Park, N.C. 122 

Morristown National Historical Park, N.J. 103 

Mound City Group National Monument, Ohio 1 26 

Mount McKinley National Park, Alaska 5 

Mount Rainier National Park, Wash. 1 78 

Mount Rushmore National Memorial, S. Dak. 147 
Mount Whitney, Calif. (See Sequoia National Park) 

Muir Woods National Monument, Calif. 26 
(See also John Muir) 



xv 



Natchez Trace Parkway, Miss.-Tenn.-Ala. 9 1 

National Capital Parks, D.C.-Md. - Va. 40 

National Mall, D.C. 41 

National Visitor Center, D.C. 41 

Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah 163 

Navajo National Monument, Ariz. 1 1 
New Orleans, Battle of (See Chalmette NHP) 

Nez Perce National Historical Park, Idaho 6 1 

Ninety Six National Historic Site, S.C. 145 

North Cascades National Park, Wash. 1 79 



Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tenn. 151 

Ocmulgee National Monument, Ga. 57 

Old North Church, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

Old South Meeting House, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

Old State House, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

Old Stone House, D.C. 42 

Olympic National Park, Wash. 1 79 

O'Neill, Eugene (See Eugene O'Neill) 

Oregon Caves National Monument, Oreg. 131 

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ariz. 1 2 

Oxon Hill Farm, Md. 80 

Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Mo. 93 



Padre Island National Seashore, Tex. 1 57 
Paul Revere House, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

Pea Ridge National Military Park, Ark. 20 

Pecos National Monument, N. Mex. 109 

Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial, Ohio 1 27 

Petersburg National Battlefield, Va. 171 

Petrified Forest National Park, Ariz. 1 2 

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Mich. 87 

Pinnacles National Monument, Calif. 27 

Pipe Spring National Monument, Ariz. 13 

Pipestone National Monument, Minn. 89 

Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. 27 

Prince William Forest Park, Va. 171 

Puukohola Heiau National Historic Site, Hawaii 59 



Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah 1 63 

Redwood National Park, Calif. 28 

Revere, Paul (See Boston NHP) 

Richmond National Battlefield Park, Va. 1 72 

Robert E. Lee Memorial (See Arlington House) 



xvi 



Rock Creek Park, D.C. 42 

Rockefeller, John D., Jr. (See John D. Rockefeller, Jr.) 

Rocky Mountain National Park, Colo. 35 

Roger Williams National Memorial, R.I. 1 42 

Roosevelt Campobello International Park, N.B., Canada 7 1 

Roosevelt, Eleanor (See Eleanor Roosevelt) 

Roosevelt, Franklin, D. (See Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt; 

Roosevelt Campobello) 
Roosevelt, Theodore (See Sagamore Hill NHS; Theodore Roosevelt) 

Ross Lake National Recreation Area, Wash. 179 

Russell Cave National Monument, Ala. 1 

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, N.Y. 1 15 

Saguaro National Monument, Ariz. 1 3 

Saint Croix Island National Monument, Maine 7 1 

St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, Wis. -Minn. 184 

Samt-Gaudens National Historic Site, N.H. 102 

Salem Maritime National Historic Site, Mass. 85 
Sandburg, Carl (See Carl Sandburg) 
Sandy Hook, N.J. (See Gateway National Recreation Area) 

San Jose Mission National Historic Site, Tex. 1 58 

San Juan Island National Historical Park, Wash. 1 80 

San Juan National Historical Park, P.R. 141 

Saratoga National Historical Park, N.Y. 115 

Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site, Mass. 85 

Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebr. 99 

Sequoia National Park, Calif. 28 

Sewall-Belmont House National Historic Site, D.C. 44 

Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area, Colo. 35 

Shenandoah National Park, Va. 172 

Shiloh National Military Park, Tenn. 1 5 1 

Sitka National Historical Park, Alaska 6 
Skyline Drive, Va. (See Shenandoah NP) 

Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Mich. 88 

Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Mass. 86 
Staten Island Unit, N.Y. (See Gateway National Recreation Area) 

Statue of Liberty National Monument, N. Y.-N.J. 1 1 5 

Stones River National Battlefield, Tenn. 1 52 

Sunset Crater National Monument, Ariz. 1 4 

Taft, W. H. (See William Howard Taft) 

Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial, Pa. 1 39 

Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site, N.Y. 116 

Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site, N.Y 116 

Theodore Roosevelt Island, D.C. 44 

Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park, N. Dak. 1 24 
(See also Sagamore Hill NHS) 



xvii 



Thomas Jefferson Memorial, D.C. 45 

Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Utah 1 63 

Tonto National Monument, Ariz. 1 5 

Touro Synagogue National Historic Site, R.I. 142 

Tumacacori National Monument, Ariz. 1 5 

Tupelo National Battlefield, Miss. 92 

Turkey Run Farm, Va. 173 

Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Ala. 2 

Tuzigoot National Monument, Ariz. 16 



USS Constitution, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial and Netherlands Carillon, Va. 173 



Valley Forge National Historical Park. Pa. 1 40 
Van Buren, Martin (See Martin Van Buren) 

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, N.Y. 1 17 

Vicksburg National Military Park, Miss. 92 

Virgin Islands National Park, V.I. 176 

Voyageurs National Park, Minn. 90 



Walnut Canyon National Monument, Ariz. 16 
Washington, Booker T. (See Booker T. Washington; Tuskegee 

Institute NHS) 

Washington Monument, DC. 45 

(See also George Washington) 
Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park (See Glacier NP) 

Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area, Calif. 29 

White House, DC. 46 

White Sands National Monument, N. Mex. 1 10 

Whitman Mission National Historic Site, Wash. 1 8 1 

William Howard Taft National Historic Site, Ohio 1 27 
Williams, Roger (See Roger Williams) 

Wilson's Creek National Battlefield, Mo. 94 

Wind Cave National Park, S. Dak. 147 

Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts, Va. 1 74 

Wright Brothers National Memorial, N.C. 1 23 

Wupatki National Monument, Ariz. 17 



Yellowstone National Park, Wyo.-Mont.-Idaho 1 87 

Yorktown Battlefield, Va. (See Colonial NHP) 

Yosemite National Park, Calif. 30 



Zion National Park, Utah 1 64 



XVlll 



Alabama 1 



Horseshoe Bend National Military Park 

Route 1, Box 103 

Daviston, Alabama 36256 

(205)234-7111 

At Horseshoe Bend, Gen. Andrew Jackson's forces broke the power of 

the Creek Indian Confederacy and opened Alabama and other parts of 

the Old Southwest to settlement after fierce fighting here March 27, 

1814, in the battle on the Tallapoosa River. This is a "Living History" area. 

The park is 12 miles (19.32 km) north of Dadeville on Alabama Highway 
49. The visitor center is at ground level and fully accessible from the 
parking lot where spaces are designated for visitors in wheelchairs. 
Restroom entry doors are 27 inches (68.58 cm) wide. Stall doors in the 
men's room are 22^ inches (57.15 cm) wide and in the women's room 
are 23-1/4 inches (59.055 cm) wide. Modification of the restrooms is 
underway. 

In the visitor center and museum, interpretation is provided by push- 
button audiovisual programs and staff talks. The park regularly schedules 
programs for visually handicapped children and for children with 
hearing impairment. 

A 3-mile (4.8 km) loop road through the battlefield has overlooks, 
roadside exhibits and paved paths to exhibit shelters. 



Natchez Trace Parkway 

(See Mississippi) 



Russell Cave National Monument 

Route 1, Box 175 
Bridgeport, Alabama 35740 
(205) 495-2672 

An almost continuous archeological record of human habitation from at 
least 6000 B.C. to about A.D. 1650 is revealed m this cave. This is a 
"Living History" area. 

The park is 8 miles (12.88 km) west of Bridgeport on County Routes 91 
and 75. The vintor center is entered at ground level from the parking 
area which has curb ramps and designated parking spaces. The walk- 
way, however, is at a slight upgrade and visitors may require assistance 
over the 53-yard (48.44 m) route to the visitor center. The alternative is a 
loop road near the visitor center where visitors in wheelchairs may be 
discharged 58 feet (17.7132 m) from the entry. Restroom entry doors 
are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide and modified stalls with curtains are 31 
inches (78.74 cm) wide. 

The cave is accessible by level path, but is entered by steps, the 
excavations can be seen only from within the cave entry. Exhibits in the 
museum depict the cave in detail. No exhibits are available for touching. 



2 Alabama 



Living history demonstrations are held in season outside the visitor 
center at the rear of the building. Interpretive talks and guided tours are 
given to organized groups, and informally to individual visitors. 



Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site 

399 Old Montgomery Road 

Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 

(205) 727-6390 

Booker T. Washington founded this college for black Americans in 1881. 

Preserved here are the student-made brick buildings, Washington's 

home, "The Oaks" and the George Washington Carver Museum. 

Park headquarters is at Grey Columns. Part of The Oaks, all of the 
museum and Grey Columns are now open to the public. Visitors in 
wheelchairs may enter the lower level (basement) of the museum from 
a service roadway to the rear of the building. A parking lot is nearby. 
Carver's workshop is in this area. 

The front of the museum and its main floor are reached by 15 
steps down a long slope. A temporary ramp is in place over one step at 
the entry. A permanent ramp with railings, of either a circular or switch- 
back form, appropriate to the historic structure, is expected to be com- 
pleted by 1979. Plans for a permanent ramp to a side porch of The Oaks 
are also being studied. 

Visitors in wheelchairs may now enter the lower (basement) level 
of the home over a temporary ramp. Temporary comfort stations are 
portable restrooms capable of accommodating visitors in wheelchairs 
near both the home and the museum. 

Audiovisual orientation programs and formal and informal inter- 
pretive programs are offered in all three buildings at various levels. A 
10-minute docu-drama is presented during the summer months. 



Alaska 3 



For general information on the Alaska group of National Parks, 
contact the Director, Alaska Area Office, Room 202, 540 West 5th 
Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 99501; telephone (907)276-8166 



Glacier Bay National Monument 

Summer: Gustavus, Alaska 99826 

Winter: Federal Building, Juneau, Alaska 99802 

(907) 697-3341 (summer); (907) 586-7127 (winter) 

Great tidewater glaciers, examples of early stages of post-glacial forests, 

and rare species of wildlife characterize Glacier Bay National Monument, 

the largest area m the National Park System. 

Access from Juneau is principally by seaplane, a Cessna 26 passenger 
craft with wide cargo doors, and by cruise ship. Charter boats can also 
be taken from Juneau but tidal docking problems present difficulties. 
The headquarters is at Bartlett Cove, 1/4 mile (0.4025 km) from the 
Lodge, 10 miles (16. 1 km) from Gustavus. Restrooms at the headquarters 
are inadequate for visitors in wheelchairs. 

The mam features of the area can be viewed by a 7-hour trip (daily) 
on a 110-passenger cruise ship, "Thunder Bay." Single-use restrooms on 
board are accessible through 30-mch (76.20 cm) wide doors, at deck 
level. A park naturalist provides interpretation on the trip. 

A boardwalk connects cabins with the Glacier Bay Lodge. Portable 
ramps are needed and available, to enter the cabins with assistance. 
Cabin bathrooms are fully accessible, but lodge restrooms on the first 
floor have 24-inch (60.96 cm) stall doors. Reservations should be made 
with Glacier Bay Lodge, Inc., Suite 312, Park Place Building, Seattle, 
Washington 98 1 1 ,( 206) 624-855 1 . 

A campfire program is held nightly in the second floor audiovisual 
room of the lodge. Personnel are available to assist visitors in wheel- 
chairs to the upper level. 



Katmai National Monument 

P.O. Box 7 

King Salmon, Alaska 99613 

(907) 246-3305 

Variety marks this vast land: lakes, forests, mountains, marshlands all 

abound m wildlife— including the Alaskan brown bear, the world's 

largest carnivore. Here in the second largest area in the National Park 

System, the volcano Novarupta erupted violently in 1912, forming the 

ash-filled "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes," where steam rose from 

countless fumeroles in the ash. Today, only a few active vents remain. 

Katmai will be a difficult area for persons with physical disabilities to 
visit until both land and water surface transportation becomes available. 



4 Alaska 



Headquarters is in King Salmon, 300 miles (483. km) southwest of 
Anchorage by air. King Salmon is 30 miles (48.3 km) from the Brooks 
River Lodge on Naknek Lake by small seaplanes. Depending on the 
weather, seaplanes land close to the beach or transfer passengers to a 
dinghy for the shore trip. The sky is clear or partly cloudy only about 20 
percent of the time. Violent winds and rainstorms, known as williwaws, 
frequently sweep the area. 

Brooks River has a modern, concession-run lodge, cabins, meals 
and a 40-mile (64.4 km) round-trip, 4-wheel-drive bus tour to the Valley 
of Ten Thousand Smokes. Illustrated evening talks on the monument, 
its scenic beauty, geology, wildlife and history are given at the lodge, 
and nature walks are conducted in the vicinity. 

King Salmon has some restaurants accessible at ground level, 
inadequate restrooms and lodgings, and minimal medical services. 



Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park 

Box 517 

Skagway, Alaska 99840 

(907) 983-2400 

The park, authorized in 1976, preserves historic Skagway structures, 

Chilkoot Trail and White Pass Trail (from Dyea to the Canadian Border) 

of the 1898 Gold Rush m Alaska, with an interpretive center in Seattle. 

The park will be part of a projected international park with Canadian 

units and will provide recreation and campgrounds for hikers. 

The interpretive center will be located at 127 South Mam Street, 
Pioneer Sguare Historic District, Seattle. Information about the Seattle 
center may be obtained from the Pacific Northwest Region of the Na- 
tional Park Service, Office of Public Affairs, 601 Fourth and Pike Build- 
ing, Seattle, Wash. 98101, (206)442-4830 

Park headquarters and visitor center are in the old train depot building 
of the White Pass and Yukon Route, at 2nd and Broadway in Skagway. 
Entrance is at ground level except for a 4-inch (9.8 cm) threshold. 
Assistance is available. The visitor center has no restrooms, but fully 
accessible restrooms are available in the new White Pass and Yukon 
Route depot, adjacent to the old depot and accessible at ground level. 

The visitor center offers an audiovisual orientation program and 
materials for self-guidance around the historic area, principally five 
blocks along Broadway. The boardwalks and sometimes uneven gravel 
streets may prove difficult for some visitors. 

Access to Skagway is by plane from Juneau, by cruise ship, or by 
State of Alaska ferryliner; and later by highway from Skagway to Car 
Cross which will be opened in the fall of 1977. Some restaurants are 
accessible at ground level; assistance is always available. 

The most modern hotel, the Klondike Inn, is accessible, with assis- 
tance over two entry steps. It has guest rooms on the ground floor. 
Public restrooms in hotels are uniformly too narrow to accommodate 



Alaska 5 



wheelchairs, but the entry doors of bathrooms in the guestrooms at the 
Klondike Inn range from 28 to 30 inches (71.12 cm to 76.20 cm) in 
width. Reservations for accessible guestrooms should be made through 
the Chamber of Commerce of Skagway. 



Mount McKinley National Park 

P.O. Box 9 

McKinley Park, Alaska 99755 

(907) 683-2294 

Mount McKinley, at 20,320 feet (6, 1 93.536 m), is the highest mountain in 

North America. Large glaciers of the Alaska Range, caribou, Dall sheep, 

moose, grizzly bears, timber wolves, and other wildlife are highlights of 

this second largest national park. 

The park is 240 miles (386.4 km) north of Anchorage and 120 miles 
(193.2 km) south of Fairbanks, on Alaska Highway 3. Alternate trans- 
portation to the park is by railroad. The Alaska Railroad runs during 
the summer daily in both directions, a 4-hour trip from Fairbanks and a 
7-hour trip from Anchorage. 

The Riley Creek visitor orientation center is 1/4 mile (0.4025 km) off 
Alaska 3 on the park road. A free sightseeing shuttlebus trip is available 
from the Riley Creek center to Wonder Lake, a 10-hour, 170-mile round 
trip. Some visitors may need assistance in boarding the bus. 

The McKinley Park Station Hotel is 3/4 mile (1.2075 km) from the 
Riley Creek center on the park road. The hotel was rebuilt in 1973, at 
the site of the original which burned to the ground in 1972. Assistance 
will be needed at present over the four entrance steps, but a ramp is 
under construction. 

Except for the entrance steps, the hotel is fully accessible by ramps 
or elevators with lobby, dining room and accessible and equipped rest- 
rooms on the mam floor; lounge and recreation room in the basement, 
overnight guestrooms on the main and second floors. Reservations 
should be made early with the hotel by writing Box 9, McKinley Park, 
Alaska 99755. The hotel also has 84 railroad car accommodations. 

Audiovisual programs, interpretive talks and self-guiding paths of 
hard-packed gravel, including one nature trail, are at the hotel area. 

The Eielson Visitor Center, 65 miles (104.60 km) from the hotel, can 
be reached by bus or car Entrance is on ground level, and displays, 
restrooms and observation facilities are all on one level and fully acces- 
sible. 

A medical clinic is 14 miles north of the park on Alaska 3. The 
nearest full range of medical services will be found in Fairbanks. The 
highest road elevation is 3,950 feet (682.34 km). 



6 Alaska 



Sitka National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 738 

Sitka, Alaska 99835 

(907) 747-3370 

The site of the 1804 fort and battle which marked the last major Tlingit 

Indian resistance to Russian colonization is preserved here. Tlingit totem 

poles are exhibited. This is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is in downtown Sitka at 1 06 Metlakatla Street. 

The center and all its facilities and events are fully accessible. Rest- 
rooms have been renovated to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. 

The 1-mile (1.61 km) round-trip trail to the Indian fort site is of hard- 
packed woodchip surface, negotiable by wheelchair with some assist- 
ance. The structures of the Russian colonization, added to the site in 
1972, are being restored and are not yet open to the public. Totem poles 
are along the trail to the Indian fort. Living demonstrations, arts and 
crafts, interpretive programs, live and audiovisual, and exhibits are 
provided in the visitor center and at other park areas. 

The park can be reached by a number of forms of transportation. 
Alaska Marine Highway provides ferry service on a regular schedule 
from Seattle and Prince Rupert. Alaska Airlines has daily service to 
Sitka from Anchorage, Seattle, Juneau and Ketchikan. A number of 
anchored cruise ships put passengers on shore by motor launch. The 
motor launches (lighters) will present difficulties for visitors in wheel- 
chairs. Accessible restaurants, lodging and medical services are avail- 
able in Sitka. 



Arizona 7 



Canyon de Chelly National Monument 

P.O. Box 588 

Chmle, Arizona 86503 

(602) 674-5436 

At the base of sheer red cliffs and in caves in canyon walls are rums of 

Indian villages built between A.D. 350 and 1300. Navajo Indians still 

live and farm here. 

The visitor center on Route 63, The Thunderbird Lodge Motel and Curio 
Shop, about 1 mile (1.61 km) away from the visitor center, and the camp- 
ground comfort stations are all accessible. The parking curb, 55 feet 
(16.75 m) from the visitor center, has a ramp. Visitor center entry doors 
are 66 inches (1.67 m) wide, but restroom stall doors are only 29 inches 
(73.66 cm) inside. 

Natural features are accessible by hiking, car, or special four-wheel- 
drive vehicles. The floor of the canyon can be reached only by four- 
wheel-drive vehicles over very rough terrain. 

Audiovisual programs and interpretive talks are offered at the visitor 
center. Campfire programs are given at Cottonwood Campground near 
the visitor center. Special talks are given April through October at White 
House Ruin on the canyon floor and on the South Rim drive to White 
House overlook. Both sites are accessible by automobile and trail. Tseigi 
Point overlook on the South Rim drive is the only accessible overlook, 
however, for visitors in wheelchairs. All other overlooks are reached by 
trails from the parking areas over rough, rocky terrain of up to 300 yards 
(274.32 m). At Tseigi Point the parking area is a pullout from the South 
Rim drive, only a few feet from the overlook, which is a broad sidewalk. 

Elevation at the visitor center is 5,500 feet (1,675 m). The South Rim 
drive averages 7,000 feet (2,132 m). Oxygen is available at the visitor 
center and at the Public Health Service at Chinle, 1 mile (1.61 km) away. 



Casa Grande National Monument 

P.O. Box 518, Coolidge, Arizona 85228 

(602)823-3172 

Perplexing rums of a massive four-story building, constructed of high- 

lime desert soil by Indians who farmed the Gila Valley 600 years ago, 

raise many unanswered questions for modern man. 

The visitor center is located one mile (1.61 km) south of Coolidge. The 
entire area is accessible. The visitor center entrance and exit have ramps 
and the parking lot has a ramp over the curb. Surfaced walks provide 
access to the visitor center, restrooms and other facilities. All doors have 
lock-open devices. Restroom doors are 30 inches (76.2 cm) wide and 
stalls have assist bars. 



8 Arizona 



An audio message repeater station, self-guiding trail and interpre- 
tive talks are available. The self-guiding trail is hard-packed earth without 
obstructions. Benches are provided at the base of each of the four legs 
supporting the shelter over the "Big House." 

Elevation is approximately 1,400 feet (426.44 m). 

Restaurant, lodging and medical services are available in Coolidge. 



Chiricahua National Monument 

Dos Cabezas Star Route, Willcox, Arizona 85643 

(602)824-3560 

The varied rock formations here were created millions of years ago by 

volcanic activity, faulting, and erosion. 

The visitor center is 38 miles (61.18 km) south of Willcox on State Route 
186. Entry is directly from the parking area over a gently sloping ramp. 
Assistance may be needed up the more steeply inclined ramp to the 
restrooms outside of the visitor center. Restroom entry doors are 28 
inches (71.12 cm) wide and stall doors 22 inches (55.88 cm). 

Parking pullouts, all hard-surfaced, include those for viewing forma- 
tions called China Boy, Sea Captain, Organ Pipe Rocks and Lake Bed 
Deposit. The first half of the self-guiding Forest Foothill Nature Trail 
near the visitor center is easily negotiable, but the last part of this trail 
would require some assistance. Other hiking trails, although of hard- 
packed earth, can present some difficulties because of steep slopes and 
occasional small rocks. Summer campfire programs are given at the 
campground, 1/2-mile (.80 km) by road from the visitor center. 

Average elevation of the mam features is 6,300 feet (1,918.98 m). 
Food, lodging and medical services are available in Willcox. 



Coronado National Memorial 

Star Route, Hereford, Arizona 856 1 5 
(602)366-5515 

Our Hispanic heritage and the first European exploration of the South- 
west, by Francisco Vasguez de Coronado in 1540-42, are commem- 
orated here, near the point wheve Coronado's expedition entered what 
is now the United States. A "Living History" area. 

The administration building which serves also as visitor center is fully 
accessible from the parking area. The center is located 22 miles south- 
west of Sierra Vista on State Route 92 and 26 miles west of Bisbee. Ex- 
hibits are in the lobby, and a few may be touched and felt. 

The picnic area is one mile (1.61 km) from the visitor center by road. 
The Annual Coronado International Historical Pageant is held each 
spring in the picnic area. For exact date, contact the area superintendent 
after February one of each year. Arrangements can be made for visitors 
in wheelchairs to be driven within 100 feet (30.46 m) of the site of the 
festival. 



Arizona 9 



Restrooms in the visitor center have entry doors 30 inches (76.20 
cm) wide with stall door widths, 24 inches (60.96 cm). Comfort stations 
at the picnic area have entry doors 36 inches (9 1 .44 cm) wide and stall 
doors 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. 

Access to Montezuma Pass contact station is accessible via a 50-foot 
(15.23-m) hard-packed gravel walk from the paved parking area. The 
parking area offers scenic views and wayside exhibits. This section of the 
monument has two chemical toilets with narrow doors, reached by 
narrow, unsurfaced trails and concrete steps. Benches are along the 
Coronado Peak trail, a 275-foot (83.77-m) climb. Interpretive talks are 
offered at Montezuma Pass and in the administration building upon 
request. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Sierra Vista. The 
elevation of the mam entrance road is 5,200 feet (1,583.92 m), rising to 
6,600 feet (2,010.36 m) within three miles (4.83 km). 



Fort Bowie National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 276, Bowie, Arizona 85605 

(602) 847-2500 

Established in 1862, this fort was the focal point of military operations 

against Geronimo and his band of Chincahua Apaches. 

The ruins can be reached only by trail. Because of its deserted wilderness 
character, the area is accessible only to persons who can hike the 1 1/2- 
mile (2.41 -km) distance from the parking area to the fort. The dirt trail 
crosses numerous washes. 

Visitors are advised to bring drinking water on warm days. The 
only restroom facilities are pit toilets. 

Average elevation of the main features is 5,000 feet (1,523.00 m). 



Glen Canyon National Recreation Area 

(See Utah) 



Grand Canyon National Park 

P.O. Box 129, Grand Canyon, Arizona 86023 

(602) 638-241 1 (North Rim (602) 638-2488, summer) 

The park, focusing on the world-famous Grand Canyon of the Colorado 

River, encompasses the entire course of the river and adjacent uplands 

from the southern terminus of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area to 

the eastern boundary of Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The 

forces of erosion have exposed an immense variety of formations which 

illustrate vast periods of geological history. 

South Rim, open all year, is 7,000 feet (2, 132.20 m) above sea level. 
The park headquarters and visitor center are located in Grand Can- 



1 Arizona 



yon Village, 60 miles (96.6 km) north of Williams and 57 miles (9 1 .77 
km) west of Cameron, both on State Highway 64. The visitor center 
exhibits, walkway and entry are all on one level and accessible by 
ramp from the parking lot. Restrooms are designed for wheelchairs. 

Some South Rim overlooks are accessible wholly or in part. 
Accessible wayside exhibits are located at Moran and Lipan Points, 
Yaki Point, Desert View, Bright Angel Trail and Kaibab Trail over- 
looks, Mather Point and Trailview. Please check at the visitor center 
for a list of scheduled ranger interpretive programs. 

Accessible lodgings, restaurants, and medical services are all 
available in Grand Canyon Village. Elevation of the South Rim park 
area ranges from 1,625 to 9,165 feet (495.3 km to 2,793.492 km). 

North Rim, open from early May to mid-October, is on State Route 
67, 43 miles (69.23 km) south of Jacob Lake (at intersection with 
Highway 89). 

The Bright Angel Ranger Station is an old building with two 
steps at the entry. The exhibit room is on the first floor. The Grand 
Lodge, in the North Rim central developed area, is accessible from 
the parking lot at ground level, as are the restrooms which can ac- 
commodate wheelchairs. The buffetena (cafeteria) is also on ground 
level. The dining room, sun porch, auditorium and veranda, how- 
ever, are reached only by steep flights of steps. The Inn (with cafeteria 
and store) is accessible at ground level and there are a few cabins 
which are accessible at ground level. Reservations for the acces- 
sible cabins should be made with T. W.A Service, Inc., 4045 South 
Spencer St., Suite A-43, Las Vegas, Nevada 89109. (702) 733-9505. 

All North Rim overlooks are wholly or partly accessible by 
wheelchair. Cape Royal and the first section of Bright Angel Point 
self-guiding trails are accessible. Cape Royal has geological talks, 
campfire programs are held near the campground in the central 
developed area. 

North Rim elevation varies from 7,870 to 8,825 feet (2,397.20 m 
to 2,688.10 m). The nearest hospital is at Fredonia on Route 89A, 
29 miles (46.69 km) northwest of Jacob Lake. 



Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 150, Ganado, Arizona 86505 

(602)755-3475 

This still-active 100-year old trading post illustrates the influence of 

reservation traders on the Indians' way of life. A "Living History" area. 

The site is one mile (1.61 km) west of Ganado, on the Navajo Indian 
Reservation. All grounds are of hard-packed earth, including the parking 
area just in front of the main trading post. The entry is at ground level 
and passage between the exhibit rooms is over ramps through doors 
readily negotiable by wheelchairs. One restroom is fully accessible. 



Arizona 1 1 



The home of John Lorenzo Hubbell, the mam home in the area, 
is on a guided tour. Ramps are planned for the two-step entrance. A 
weaving demonstration in the room next to the mam exhibit room is 
fully accessible. 

Average elevation is 6,330 feet ( 1,928. 12 m). A hospital is in Ganado. 
The nearest food and lodging will be found at Chmle, 35 miles (56.35 km) 
north on State Highway 63, or at Window Rock 30 miles (48.30 km) east 
on State Highway 264. 



Lake Mead National Recreation Area 

(See Nevada) 



Montezuma Castle National Monument 

P.O. Box 218 

Camp Verde, Arizona 86322 

(602) 567-3322 

One of the best-preserved cliff dwellings in the United States, this five- 
story, 20-room castle is 90 percent intact. Montezuma Well is also of 
archeological and geological interest. 

The visitor center is located one mile ( 1 .61 km) off Interstate 17, five miles 
(8.05 km) north of Camp Verde. Ramped parking area curb provides 
access to the visitor center 130 feet (39.60 m) away. The men's restroom 
is entered by two steps, the women's restroom by five steps. Outside 
restroom doors are 28 inches (71.1 cm) wide, stall doors are 30 inches 
(76.2 cm) wide. 

Most of the self-guiding Sycamore Trail is accessible except for the 
portion on the upper level through Castle "A." Also accessible are trail- 
side interpretive devices and an audio interpretation at a shelter housing 
a model of Montezuma Castle. At the Well section, the picnic area and 
information station are accessible. The Well secton is steep. Conducted 
tours are given upon request. Average elevation of the monument is 
3,200 feet (974.72 m). Food and lodging are available at Camp Verde. 
A hospital is at Cottonwood 20 miles (32.2 km) away. 



Navajo National Monument 

Tonalea, Arizona 86044 

(602) 672-2366 

Betatakm, Keet Seel and Inscription House m this "Living History" area 

are three of the largest and most elaborate cliff dwellings known. 

The visitor center, 30 miles (48.30 km) southwest of Kayenta on State 
Highway 160, is accessible by a curb ramp at the parking area 40 feet 
(12.18m) away. Entry is by double doors 6 feet ( 1 .82 m) wide. The Navajo 



1 2 Arizona 



Tribal Arts and Crafts Guild salesroom, the exhibit room and an audi- 
torium are in the visitor center. The restroom entry and stall doors are 
28 inches (71.12 cm) wide. 

Betatakin and Tseigi Canyons can be seen from the patio. Level 
sidewalks of concrete or hard-packed earth with some inclines lead to 
the Fork-Stick Hogan exhibit and the picnic area. A hard-packed gravel 
trail leads to the campfire circle. Access to the cliff dwellings is by ladder 
or very steep steps. 

Elevation is 7,280 feet (2,217.49 m). The nearest restaurant, lodging 
and medical services are at Kayenta. 



Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument 

P.O. Box 38, A)o, Arizona 85321 

(602) Organ Pipe ftl, through operator. 

Sonoran Desert plants and animals found nowhere else m the United 

States are protected here, alongside traces of an historic trail, Cammo 

del Diablo. 

Park headquarters and visitor center are south of Ajo by 35 miles 
(56.35 km) on State Highway 85. The visitor center with exhibit room 
and live interpretive programs is approached by a ramp with sturdy 
handrails from designated spaces in the parking area adjacent to the 
visitor center. Restrooms in the visitor center and one at the camp- 
ground have wide doors, outswingmg booth doors and handrails in the 
booths. Campsites are paved as are the approach walks to the special 
campground restroom. 

The Quitobaquito Oasis foot trail has been redesigned and is acces- 
sible by ramp from the parking lot. It is of hard-packed earth, but with a 
few soft spots, where the new trail has not yet packed down or may have 
eroded, over which visitors in wheelchairs may require assistance. Self- 
guiding motor nature trails enable visitors to observe the character and 
mam features of the monument. 

The elevation range of the monument is approximately 1,000 feet 
to 4,066 feet (304.8 m to 1,239.32 m); the range of road elevations is 
approximately from 1,000 feet (304.8 m) to 2,000 feet (609.6 m). Food 
and lodging are available in Lukeville, five miles (8.05 km) from head- 
quarters on State Highway 85; full medical services are available in Ajo. 



Petrified Forest National Park 

Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona 86025 

(602) 524-6228 

Trees that have petrified, or changed to multicolored stone, Indian ruins 

and petroglyphs and portions of the colorful Painted Desert are here. 

The Painted Desert visitor center is 26 miles (4 1 .86 km) east of Holbrook 
on Interstate 40. Two spaces have been set aside in the parking lot 



Arizona 1 3 



closest to the ramp approximately 40 feet (12.16m) from the entry of the 
visitor center, which is also ramped. Restroom stalls at this visitor center, 
in an outside building, are 33 inches (83.80 cm) wide. Curio shop and 
eating facilities at Painted Desert visitor center and also at the Rainbow 
Forest visitor center have wide doors and are entered at ground level. 
Restroom stall doors at Rainbow Forest visitor center are 31 inches 
(78.74 cm) wide. 

The entire park road, 28 miles (45.06 km) in length, is an interpre- 
tive drive through key features. Most of the overlooks are easily acces- 
sible. Information on this point may be obtained at the Painted Desert 
visitor center. The park is located at an elevation of between 5,800 and 
6,200 feet (1,766.68 m). The nearest lodging and medical facilities are 
at Holbrook. 



Pipe Spring National Monument 

Moccasin, Arizona 86022 

(602) 643-5505 

This historic fort and other structures, built here by Mormon pioneers 

m the 1860 s and 1870's, memorialize the struggle for exploration and 

settlement of the South west. This is a "Living Historical Ranch " area. 

All phases of the "Living Historical Ranch" tour are accessible except 
those on the fort's second floor which is reached by steep and narrow 
stairs. Assistance is needed by visitors in wheelchairs to enter the visitor 
center over two steps, and the other historic buildings over four large 
and high steps. Parking and restroom areas are accessible. Restroom 
entry door widths in the visitor center are 36 inches (91.44 cm) and 
stalls, with swinging doors, have an entry width of 25 inches (63.5 cm). 

Quiet walks and benches in cool spots are found throughout the 
area. 

Around the fort, push-button recorders aid self-guiding tours; with- 
in the fort are exhibits, visual interpretation and conducted tours. 

Elevation of the area is 5,000 feet (1,523.0 m). Nearest food, lodging 
and full-range of medical services are at Kanab, 21 miles (33.81 km) east 
on U.S. 89. Some food and lodging can be found in Fredonia, 14 miles 
(22.54 km) west on State 389. 



Saguaro National Monument 

P.O.Box 17210 

Tucson, Arizona 857 1 

(602) 298-2036 

Giant saguaro cactus, unique to the Sonoran Desert of southern Arizona 

and northwestern Mexico, sometimes reach a height of 50 feet (15.24 m) 

in this cactus forest. 

The park headquarters and visitor center in the Rmcon Mountain Section 



1 4 Arizona 



are located on Old Spanish Trail at Freeman Road, 5 miles (8.05 km) east 
of Tucson. Ramps provide ready access from the parking lots to the east 
side visitor center and the information center in the Tucson Mountain 
Section, located 2 miles (3.22 km) west of the (Tucson) Desert Museum, 
on Kinney Road. Both centers are equipped with restrooms designed for 
visitors in wheelchairs. 

Visitor center facilities include a cactus garden exhibit room, an 
outside exhibit area and an audiovisual room where a natural history 
slide program is presented every 20 minutes. Wayside exhibits, includ- 
ing a 300-yard (27.43 m) self-guiding nature trail and a picnic area, are 
accessible to visitors in wheelchairs taking the scenic 9-mile (14.48 km) 
Cactus Forest Drive. 

Average elevation of the saguaro forests and scenic drives ranges 
from 2,500 feet (761 .50 m) in the Tucson Mountain Section to 3,200 feet 
(974.72 m) in the Rmcon Mountain Section. The crest of the Rincon 
Mountains is 8,666 feet (2,639.66 m) and is accessible only by steep, 
wilderness trails. 

Food, lodging and medical services are readily available in Tucson. 



Sunset Crater National Monument 

Route 3, Box 149 
Flagstaff, Arizona 86001 
(602) 526-0586 

Its upper part glowing as if by sunset, this volcanic cinder cone with 
summit crater was formed just before A.D. 1100. To reach the visitor 
center, drive 15 miles (24.15 km) north on Highway 89 from Flagstaff, 
then east on the loop road connecting Sunset Crater National Monument 
with Wupatki National Monument— a well-marked crossroads. A ramp 
from the parking area and two ramps from the front walk provide access 
to the center. Restroom doors are 33-mches (83.82 cm) wide; the largest 
stall opening is 30 inches (76. 20 cm). 

Audiovisual programs are given at the visitor center, with nightly camp- 
fire programs during the summer. Cinder Hills overlook, Lava Flow and 
Base, Painted Desert Picnic Area and three wayside exhibits are reached 
by driving the 18-mile (28.97 km) loop road which connects Sunset 
Crater National Monument with Wupatki National Monument. 

Two foottrails across lava flows and loose cinders at Bonito Lava 
Flow and the Lava Flow Nature Trail may present difficulties, as may the 
44-site campground, for visitors with mobility impairment. 

Average elevation is 7,000 feet (2, 1 32.20 m). The nearest restaurants, 
lodging and medical facilities are in Flagstaff. 



Arizona 15 



Tonto National Monument 

P.O. Box 707, Roosevelt, Arizona 85545 

(602)467-2241 

77?ese well-preserved cliff dwellings were occupied during the early 

part of the 14th century by Solado Indians, who farmed in the Salt 

River Valley. 

The visitor center is 29 miles (46.69 km) north of Globe on State Route 
88. In the parking area is a desert floral display. From there, visitors can 
enjoy a spectacular view of the Sierra Anchas, Roosevelt Lake and the 
landscape of the lower Sonoran Desert, as well as the cliff dwelling 
located 350 feet (106.61 m) above the parking area. The visitor center 
contains a museum of Salado Indian Life and artifacts. 

The museum, lobby, restrooms and picnic area are all easily acces- 
sible. Restroom entry doors are 30 inches (76.20 m) wide and stall doors, 
24 inches (60.96 cm). 

Two audiovisual programs are given on the observation deck on 
top of the visitor center. The observation deck is reached by two flights 
of 10 steps each, separated by a landing, and equipped with handrails. 
Access the the cliff dwellings is by a steep 1/2-mile (0.805 km) trail. 

Elevation of the area is 2,800 feet (853.44 m). 



Tumacacori National Monument 

P.O. Box 67, Tumacacori, Arizona 85640 

(602)398-2341 

This historic Spanish Catholic mission building stands near the site first 

visited by Jesuit Father Kino in 1691. This is a 'Living History" area. 

Facilities easily accessible by wheelchair at this area include the visitor 
center with museum exhibits, patio garden and self-guiding paths 
through the mission grounds. Two steps, 8 inches (20.32 cm) and 5 
inches (12.70 cm), lead down into the interior of the old church. Rest- 
rooms in the visitor center, an old adobe structure, have 26 inches 
(66.04 cm) wide entry doors and stall doors 33 inches (83.80 cm) wide. 
The stalls are equipped with grab bars. 

The monument is 45 miles (72.42 km) south of Tucson and 18 miles 
(28.97 km) north of Nogales on U.S. Highway 89. The elevation of the 
monument is 3,260 feet (991.04 m). Food, lodging and medical services 
are available in Tucson and Nogales. 



1 6 Arizona 



Tuzigoot National Monument 

P.O. Box 68 

Clarkdale, Arizona 86324 

(602) 634-5564 

Rums of a large Indian pueblo which flourished in the Verde Valley 

between A.D. 1 100 and 1450 have been excavated here. 

The visitor center is two miles (3.22 km) east of Clarkdale. Visitors in 
wheelchairs can enter the visitor center via a ramp from the service road. 
A ramp walkway leads to the restrooms that have one stall with wide 
doors and handrails in both the men's and women's facilities. 

The museum has a model of the rum, 2 1 exhibit cases showing the 
culture of the Smagua Indians and a room showing a life-size model of 
Indian life 500 years ago. Although a ramp by-passing steps on the 
rum trail permits access to the rums by visitors in wheelchairs, the trail 
is quite steep. 

Elevation is 3,420 feet ( 1 ,04 1 .73 m). 



Walnut Canyon National Monument 

Route 1, Box 25, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001 
(602) 388-2595 

These cliff dwellings were built m shallow caves under ledges of lime- 
stone by Pueblo Indians about 800 years ago. 

The visitor center is seven miles east of Flagstaff on Interstate 40 or 
Route 66, then three miles south on State Highway 166. Ramps cover 
curbs from the parking lot 25 yards (22.86 m) from the visitor center. 
Restroom entry is from the outside, booth doors are solid metal, swing- 
ing-type; hand-hold assist bars are provided. 

Three roadside picnic areas on the entrance road and one walk-in 
picnic area, reached by hard-surfaced trail about 100 yards (91.44 m) 
from the parking area, are fully accessible. The 5/8-mile (1.01 km) round 
trip Rim Trail is hard-surfaced but assistance may be required where the 
grade is steep. Each trail is provided with taped messages. Conducted 
tours by park interpreters can be arranged for special groups by advance 
request to the park Superintendent. 

Elevation is 6,700 feet (2,040.82 m). Food, lodging and medical 
facilities are available in Flagstaff. 



Arizona 17 



Wupatki National Monument 

Tuba Star Route 

Flagstaff, Arizona 8600 1 

Hums of red sandstone pueblos built by farming Indians about A.D. 

1065 are preserved here. The modern Hopi Indians are believed to be 

partly descended from these people. 

The visitor center is on the 18-mile (28.97 km) loop road which connects 
Wupatki National Monument with Sunset Crater National Monument. 
Drive 15 miles (24.15 km) north of Flagstaff on Highway 89, then east 
on the loop road. 

Two ramps lead from the parking area to the front walk of the visitor 
center which has wide doors at ground level. Restroom doors are 29 
inches (73.66 cm) wide, and stall doors, 22 inches (55.88 cm) wide. 

On the loop road, visitors can view the Painted Desert from the 
Doney Picnic Area, see Nalakihu Rum, have a close view of Wukoko 
and enjoy two wayside exhibits. Advance reservations may be made 
for a bus trip to O'Leary Peak, off the loop road. 

The nearest restaurants, lodging and medical facilities are in Flag- 
staff. Average elevation is 4,900 feet (1,492.54 m). 



1 8 Arkansas 



Arkansas Post National Memorial 

Route l,Box 16 

Gillett, Arkansas 72055 

(501)548-2432 

This site commemorates the first permanent European settlement in the 

lower Mississippi Valley, founded in 1686. 

The temporary visitor center is fully accessible, there are no curbs at the 
parking lot or steps at the entry. Doorway to the restroom, however, is 
24 inches (60.96 cm) and there is no handrail. 

The picnic area, tour road around the lake, foundations of the 
branch of the Bank of Arkansas and the Notrebe cistern are all acces- 
sible by automobile. The 1/2-mile (0.80 km) nature-history trail is level 
and fully accessible. The comfort station at the picnic area has wide 
doorways and handrails in the stalls. 

The visitor center has one audiovisual interpretive program. On the 
loop road are 1 1 interpretive plaques — all raised and in big print — and 
one pushbutton audio interpretation. On the nature-history trail are 19 
interpretive signs and one pushbutton audio interpretation. 

The nearest hospital and medical services are 20 miles (32.19 km) 
north at DeWitt or 20 miles (32.19 km) south at Dumas. Ambulance 
service is available at both towns. The best time to visit the area is 
September through May because of the extreme heat, humidity and 
insects during the summer months. 



Buffalo National River 

P.O.Box 1173 

Harrison, Arkansas 72601 

(501)741-5443 

This scenic, unpolluted river, 132 miles (212.43 km) long, winds through 

the Ozark Mountains, ft is a mecca for canoeists and fishermen. 

Buffalo Point, a former state park, is the only developed unit in this new 
park at the present time. The visitor contact station at Buffalo Point can 
be reached by proceeding west from Harrison on U.S. 62 to Yellville, 
then south on Ark. 14, a distance of approximately 47 miles (75.62 km). 

The station is easily accessible and the rampway into the dining 
room is suitable for wheelchairs, but the small 4-feet by 8-feet (1.22 m 
by 2.44 m) restroom, entered from the outside of the old building, is 
inaccessible. 

Buffalo Point campground is on the river, about one mile (1.61 km) 
from the visitor contact station. It can be reached by automobile by a 
steeply graded, paved roadway. Campground restroom stalls are easily 
accessible and fully equipped. 

An automatic slide program is presented at the Buffalo Point visitor 
contact station. Information concerning all other facilities on the river may 



Arkansas 19 



be obtained there. These facilities, however, are primarily primitive or 
undeveloped campgrounds with river access points. 

Nearest lodgings and medical facilities from Buffalo Point are 17 
miles (27.36 km) away at Yellville, Ark. 



Fort Smith National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 1406, Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 

(501)783-3961 

One of the first U.S. military posts m the Louisiana Territory, the fort was a 

center of authority for the untamed region to the West from 1817 to 1890. 

The site is within the city limits. Approaches are from Interstate 40, from 
the east, at Exit 540, and from the west at State Route 64. The temporary 
visitor center is in the jail wing of an old barracks. Access is difficult 
with eight steps at the front entrance and three steps at an alternative 
entrance. Standard-sized restrooms for visitors in wheelchairs are not 
readily accessible because of the building entry problems. Plans are 
under consideration for remodeling of the building during restoration to 
make the center area fully accessible. 

The old commissary building housing the museum is entered at 
ground level. The museum is temporarily operated under a special use 
permit and staffed by members of a museum board of private citizens. A 
museum fee is charged. The first floor of the building is an old courtroom 
with exhibits of judge's bench, jury box, defendant's and prosecutor's 
tables, witness box and other courtroom furnishings. Display cases 
exhibit sheriff's gear, court documents and other items depicting ele- 
ments of the military judicial system of the period. Plans for Park Service 
operation of the museum are under development. The reconstructed gal- 
lows, 40 yards (36.48 m) from the parking area, are of historical interest. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in the city of 
Fort Smith. 



Hot Springs National Park 

P.O.Box 1860 

Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas 7 1 90 1 

(501)624-3383 

More than a million gallons of water a day flow from 47 hot springs here, 

unaffected by climate or seasonal temperatures. Persons suffering from 

illness or injury often seek relief in the ancient tradition of thermal bathing. 

Curbs in the downtown area are cut or covered by ramps but parking 
remains a problem. The visitor center at Reserve Street and Central 
Avenue is accessible via ramp at the rear door but its restroom facilities 
are cramped. Audiovisual programs and interpretive exhibits are 
accessible. 



20 Arkansas 



Entry into the lobbies of the six bathhouses on Bathhouse Row is 
either at ground level or by ramp. Restrooms in these old facilities are 
"standard" but with no special equipment. All visitors have access to the 
bathing facilities, but must be able to lift themselves in and out of the tubs. 
Another facility, the Libbey Memorial Physical Medicine Center, is 3 
blocks east of the visitor center at Reserve and Spring Streets. The 
center is under physicians' supervision and has hoist apparatus for 
lifting patrons into the pools for hydrotherapy. 

Paved trails lead to the Display Springs from Central Avenue and 
the Grand Promenade and most of the self-guiding nature trails on the 
Promenade are also accessible. Directions to each of these areas may be 
obtained at the visitor center. Evening campfire programs are held in 
the Gulpha Gorge Campground amphitheater and interpretive exhibits 
may be seen in the campground ranger station. 



Pea Ridge National Military Park 

Pea Ridge, Arkansas 72751 
(501)451-8122 

The Union victory here on March 7-8, 1862, in one of the major engage- 
ments of the Civil War west of the Mississippi, led to the Union's control 
of the Missouri. 

The visitor center is 10 miles (16.10 km) north of Rogers off U.S. High- 
way 62. The parking area with reserved parking spaces is 100 feet 
(30.48 m) from the center. The visitor center, exhibit rooms and audi- 
torium are all accessible, with the exception of the observation terrace 
which is reached by three steps up from the foyer. Restroom doors' 
widths are 36 inches (91.44cm) and stall doors' 24 inches (60.96cm). 

Most of the wayside stations with interpretive devices on the park 
tour road are accessible. The next-to-last stop on the park tour road is 
Elkhorn Tavern, the major interpretive site on the road. This historic 
building is entered by two narrow steps to the porch. The tavern is 150 
feet (45.72 m) from the parking area and is reached by level walk. 

The self-guiding trail in the detached section of the park has a very 
steep incline up to the hilltop entrenchment. Interpretation is below at 
trail level. The self-guiding drive in the detached section is over ex- 
tremely rough surface. 



California 2 1 



Cabrillo National Monument 

P.O. Box 6175, San Diego, California 92106 

(714)293-5450 

Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, Portuguese explorer who claimed the west 

coast of the United States for Spam m 1542, is memorialized here. 

An added sight during the winter is the gray whales that migrate 

offshore here. 

The visitor center Loma Point has a traffic circle for unloading, parking is 
75 yards (68.40 m) away. Walkways, auditorium, whale-viewing pavilion, 
exhibit room, administration building and visitor center restrooms are all 
accessible. Restroom stall doors are 25 inches (63.50 cm) wide. 

Two overlooks at the view building are accessible by a slightly 
inclined walkway. A rest area with benches, water fountain and harbor 
view is accessible from the west entrance. The Cabrillo statue near the 
visitor center is reached by a gently sloping concrete walkway. The light- 
house tower grounds are accessible. However, the lighthouse entrance 
is reached by steps and the tower climb presents difficulties as the steps 
are steep and narrow. Bilingual (English and Spanish) audio stations at 
the Whale Overlook and at the lighthouse tower grounds are easily 
reached. The tidal pool can be reached only by a rocky shoreline trail 
and the Bayside Trail is an old, abandoned ]eep trail. 



Channel Islands National Monument 

1966 Anchors Way Drive, Ventura, California 93003 

(805)644-8157 

The monument, with a large rookery of sea lions, nesting sea birds and 

unique plants and animals, includes Santa Barbara and Anacapa Islands. 

A visitor center at Ventura Marina has a recorded slide program and 
exhibits on the Channel Islands. The center has three steps at the entry 
and the restroom facilities cannot accommodate wheelchairs. 

All visitors can take the boat trips to Anacapa and Santa Barbara 
Islands, but the steep inclines up the cliffs make access onto the islands 
difficult. Much of the flora, fauna and geology of the islands, however, 
can be clearly seen from the boat. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Ventura. 

Death Valley National Monument 

Death Valley, California 92328 

(714)786-2331 

This large desert, nearly surrounded by high mountains, contains the 

lowest point in the Western Hemisphere. The area includes Scotty's 

Castle, the grandiose home of a famous prospector, and other remnants 

of gold and borax mining activity. 

The visitor center, located on State Highway 190, is fully accessible from 



22 California 



the paved parking lot. New restrooms are designed for full accessi- 
bility and convenience. The Furnace Creek Inn, near the visitor center, 
has elevator service to all floors and has fully accessible restaurants, 
restrooms and guest rooms. Reservations should be made ahead by 
calling the Inn at (7 1 4) 786-2345. 

Snack bar and gift shop as well as exhibits are on the first floor of 
the famous Scotty's Castle. The upper floors with their exhibits are 
accessible by steps. 

Many natural features are accessible by car. Most trails are unpaved 
and sandy. 

The visitor center has a 20-mmute recorded slide program and other 
interpretive programs from November through April. Heat is severe 
from May through October. Elevations along the entrance roads and to 
mam points of interest in the valley range from 280 feet (85.29 m) below 
sea level to 5,000 feet (1,523.00 m) above sea level. Other points of in- 
terest on side trips in the mountains, easily accessible by road, range up 
to 8,133 feet (2,477.31 m) above sea level. The nearest hospital is at 
Lone Pine, California, 100 miles (161 km) north on State Highway 190. 



Devils Postpile National Monument 

c/o Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks 
Three Rivers, California 9327 1 
(714)943-2289 

Hot lava cooled and cracked some 900,000 years ago to form sym- 
metrical blue-gray basalt columns 40 to 60 feet (12.16 to 18.28 m) high 
resembling a giant pipe organ. The John Muir Trail between Yosemite 
and Kings Canyon National Parks crosses the monument. 

The monument is reached by a lO 1 ^ mile (169 km) drive to Mmeret 
Summit on a paved road from U.S. 395, and then by 5Vz miles (8.85 km) 
of unpaved, gravel mountain road. The average elevation is 7,600 feet 
(2,314.96 m); facilities are primitive. The contact station is a log cabin, 
with small restrooms in a separate building. No overlooks are accessible 
from the contact station except by difficult driving or hiking, either on 
the unpaved mountain road or on off-road rough terrain. 

Fort Point National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 29333, Presidio of San Francisco, California 94129 
(415)556-1693 

This classic brick and granite mid- 19th century fort, located under the 
southern anchorage of the Golden Gate Bridge at the mouth of San 
Francisco Bay, is the largest fortification along the West Coast. The site 
is considered to be one of the most spectacular areas in San Francisco. 

The first floor of the fort is fully accessible, from designated parking 
spaces, directly into the fort at ground level and through wide doors. 
The restroom facilities in the fort are inadequate for visitors in wheelchairs. 



California 23 



The exhibits consist of pictures and print telling the story of Fort 
Point, and cannon and other equipment related to that story. Interpretive 
talks are given and descriptive materials are handed out. Sixty-seven 
spiral stone steps lead to the upper floors, the fourth of which is the 
observation (barbette) floor. Tour guides are available at all times. 



Golden Gate National Recreation Area 

Fort Mason, San Francisco, California 94123 
(415)556-2920 

This extensive new, urban recreation area (35,000 acres— 14,164.50 
hectares), in and around San Francisco, offers abundant outdoor recrea- 
tional opportunities and historical settings. 

Most of the units within this area are accessible by public transportation 
and by automobile. Within the city, the San Francisco Muni transporta- 
tion system serves Aquatic Park, Fort Mason, Marina Green, Presidio 
of San Francisco, Fort Point, Bakers Beach, Land's End, Fort Miley, 
Sutro Heights Park, Ocean Beach and Fort Funston. During the summer 
months, the Muni system serves Fort Baker and Fort Cronkhite/Rodeo 
Lagoon. Golden Gate Transit serves areas reached via Highway 1, 
including Stmson Beach, the Bolinas area and Olema Valley in Marin 
County. The ferry system serving Angel Island State Park (within the 
boundary of the recreation area) is fully accessible to visitors in wheel- 
chairs. Concession-operated ferry leaves every 40 minutes from Fisher- 
man's Wharf for Alcatraz. The boats are accessible with assistance up 
the ramps. Narrow restrooms are on the mam deck. Exhibits and audio- 
visual programs are in the small museum which may be entered either 
with assistance over three steps at the front entry, or in the rear with 
assistance over a steep trail at ground level. All trails on the island are 
of concrete, but many are steep. Restrooms have chemical toilets. Entry 
into the prison requires assistance over steps. Guided tours are con- 
ducted by park technicians. The round trip, including the guided tour, 
is about L/2 hours. 

Picnic facilities are reached by public transportation and automobile. 
Benches are provided along walks. Bird watching is rewarding in the 
Forts Barry and Cronkhite areas. Many quiet spots to rest and con- 
template nature are here. 

The only fully accessible restroom facilities are at Fort Cronkhite. 
Other restroom facilities are less than adequate for visitors in wheel- 
chairs in major areas of this urban park. 

Motels and restaurants are located within walking distance of most 
of the municipal sections of the park. Information on location of medical 
facilities can be obtained from park personnel who also can provide 
special services as necessary. 



24 California 



John Muir National Historic Site 

4202 Alhambra Avenue, Martinez, California 94553 

(415)228-8860 

The home of John Muir and adjacent Martinez Adobe commemorate 

Muir's contribution to conservation and literature. This is "Living History" 

area. 

The house is entered by a number of steps for which a portable ramp has 
been acquired. Because of the weight and structure of the ramp, how- 
ever, it can only be set in place for groups upon advance arrangement. 
The visitor center, with parking in front, is fully accessible through curb 
cuts and at ground level. Restroom doors in the visitor center are 31 
inches (78.74 cm) and stall doors, 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. Plans are 
underway for enlargement of the stalls. 

Audio-visual programs are offered in the visitor center. Exhibits 
are throughout the area. The trails around the ground are paved but 
some assistance may be required in steep areas. One golf cart is avail- 
able to take visitors up the hill to the home. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in the community 
of Martinez. 



Joshua Tree National Monument 

74485 Palm Vista Drive 

Twenty-nine Palms, California 92217 

(714)367-3553 

A representative stand of Joshua trees and a great variety of desert 

plants and animals, including the desert bighorn sheep, exist in this 

desert region. 

The Twenty-nine Palms Centers, the Oasis of Mara nature trail and Keys 
View overlook are accessible by curb ramps and paved areas leading 
to the areas. Restroom facilities and telephone are fully accessible to 
visitors in wheelchairs at Twenty-nine Palms Visitor Center. 

All important natural features can be viewed from cars: rock for- 
mations, Joshua trees and other desert plants, wildflower displays, part 
of the Salton View overlook and Cholla Cactus Garden. 

The elevation ranges from 1,000 feet (304.60 m) in the eastern 
portion to nearly 6,000 feet (1,827.60 m) in the Little San Bernardino 
Mountains. 



Kings Canyon National Park 

Three Rivers, California 9327 1 

(209)565-3341 

Two enormous canyons of the Kings River and the summit peaks of the 

High Sierra dominate this mountain wilderness. General Grant Grove, 

with its giant seguoias, is a detached section of the park. 



California 25 



The Grant Grove visitor center is located about 55 miles (88.55 km) 
from Fresno on State Route 180. The center is fully accessible at ground 
level from the parking lot. Restrooms are fully accessible. Information, 
audio-visual programs, publications and exhibits are provided. Evening 
campfire programs at Grant Grove and Cedar Grove amphitheaters 
are accessible by paved trails. On the General Grant Grove Tree Trail, 
a paved loop trail, a special tape-recorded guide for visually handi- 
capped visitors is offered. Some assistance is needed. 

Most campgrounds with accessible restrooms and other overnight 
concessioner facilities, as well as the Grant Grove Coffee Shop can be 
reached by paved trail, but the Grant Grove cabin accommodations, 
campground restrooms, and the Cedar Grove store have several steps 
that will require assistance for the visitor in wheelchair. Information about 
lodging is available at the visitor center, but reservations for fully acces- 
sible lodgings should be made prior to the trip. Write or call Sequoia 
and Kings Canyon Hospitality Service, Sequoia National Park, Calif., 
93262, telephone (209) 565-3373. 

Sightseeing by car is excellent. Overlooks, in general, are accessible, 
but it would be better to check for such information at the visitor center 
before setting out. Weather and road conditions are best from May 
through October for visiting the park. Elevation of the park roads ranges 
from 4,600 to 7,000 feet (1402.08 m to 2,133.6 m). Rental car service is 
available in Fresno. Daily bus service from mid-May to mid-September 
connects with bus depot, air terminal and AMTRAK depot in Fresno. 
A full range of medical services is available in Fresno. 



Lassen Volcanic National Park 

Mineral, California 96063 

(916)595-4444 

The park contains outstanding examples of major volcanic phenomena, 

including Lassen Peak, the only recently active volcano in the coterminous 

United States, which erupted intermittently from 1914-1921. This is a 

"Living History" area. 

The approach to the park from the north is via State Routes 44 and 89. 
Redding is 48 miles west of the park on State Route 44. The temporary 
visitor center at Manzanita Lake is accessible. Nearby is the camper 
service store and comfort station with new restrooms designed for 
visitors in wheelchairs. The amphitheater where interpretive programs 
are given is fully accessible. 

The south end of the park, the Sulphur Works area, can be reached 
either by continuing south through the park on Route 89, a distance of 30 
miles (48.3 km), or driving from Red Bluff on State Route 36, about 43 
miles (69.23 km) west of Mineral to the intersection of 89 and 36, on to 
89 and into the park. The Sulphur Works visitor center is entered at 
ground level, and the restrooms have wide doors and are fully accessible. 

The first section of the Sulphur Works self-guiding nature trail is 



26 California 



of packed asphalt and fully accessible. Other accessible areas are the 
Devastated Area exhibits and Windy Point, Diamond Point, Kings Creek 
Meadow, Devastated Area and Lassen Peak vistas. Elevations on mam 
roads range from 5,800 to 8,500 feet (1,766.68 to 2,589.10 m). The 
average elevation of mam features is 7,000 feet (2,132.20 m). Park head- 
quarters, restaurants and lodging are at Mineral; restaurants, lodging 
and full-range medical services are available at Chester, 30 miles (48.3 km) 
east of Mineral on Route 36. 



Lava Beds National Monument 

P.O. Box 867 

Tulelake, California 96 1 34 

(916)667-2601 

Volcanic activity has created a rugged landscape — a natural fortress 

used by the Indians in the Modoc Indian War, 1872-73. 

The visitor center/museum building is 30 miles southwest of Tulelake 
on U.S. 139. Fully accessible restrooms are in the visitor center which 
is entered at ground level. 

Exhibits and two 3-mmute pushbutton audiovisual slide programs 
are provided. The Indian well campground, near park headquarters, 
is accessible by car and offers campfire programs. Bird and animal life 
can be observed at the stopping points along the park road. 

The altitude at park headquarters is 4,700 feet (7,567.0 km). Acces- 
sible lodging, restaurants and medical services are available in Tulelake. 



Muir Woods National Monument 

Mill Valley, California 9494 1 

(415)388-2595 

This virgin stand ol coastal redwoods was named lor John Muir, writer 

and conservationist. 

The snackbar and gift shop, information station, all restrooms and a 
one-mile (1.61 km) paved trail, including interpretive displays and a 
self-guiding nature trail, are accessible. In addition, a roped trail marked 
with large print text and Braille signs describing the environment is 
provided for visitors with visual impairment. Park rangers are available 
for assistance on trails. Interpretive talks may be arranged with advance 
notice. Hikes beyond the valley floor require strenuous effort. 

The monument is 12 miles (19.31 km) from the nearest hospital in 
San Rafael and 17 miles (27.36 km) north of San Francisco. The monu- 
ment is open from 8 a.m. until sunset; the least crowded periods are 
before 10 a.m. or late in the afternoon. Buses operate from San Fran- 
cisco on weekends and holidays. 



California 27 



Pinnacles National Monument 

Paicines, California 95043 

(408) 389-4578 

Spirelike rock formations 500 to 1,200 feet (152.30 to 365.52m) high, 

with caves and volcanic features, rise above the smooth contours of the 

surrounding countryside. 

The headquarters is in an old building in Bear Gulch, a narrow canyon. 
The headquarters is reached by a rough mountainous road. It is 35 
miles (56.35 km) south of Hollister via state roads 25 and 146. The east 
side buildings of the monument and all special activities in this area are 
difficult of access because of the steep terrain and unsurfaced walks. 
The Bear Gulch Cave hike, a round-trip of 1-3/4 miles (2.82 km) is a 
strenuous 300-feet (91 .38 m) rise with 150 steps interspersed. 

The east side campground at Chalone Creek just off State Route 
146, is easily accessible, with well designed and fully accessible rest- 
rooms. The same is true of the west side Chapparal campground which 
is reached from Highway 101, 11 miles (17.71 km) east from the turnoff 
at Soledad. All natural features on the west side of the monument may 
be viewed without difficulty from automobile. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available m Soledad and 
Hollister. 



Point Reyes National Seashore 

Point Reyes, California 94956 

(415)663-1701 

This peninsula near San Francisco is noted for its long beaches backed 

by tall cliffs, lagoons and estuaries, forested ridges and offshore bird 

and sea lion colonies. Part of the area remains a private pastoral zone. 

A "Living History " area. 

Spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, Drakes Estero, Drakes 
Beach, Point Reyes Beach and rolling headlands may be seen from a 
car. There are parking areas adjacent to Drakes Beach and Point Reyes 
Beach. 

The Drakes Beach Visitor Center, 100 feet (30.46 m) from the park- 
ing area, has ramps with handrails and mam doors 10 feet (3.05 m) wide. 
Restroom doors are 36 inches (91.44 cm) wide with stall doors 30 
inches (76.20 cm) wide. A concession room and picnic area are also 
easily accessible. 

Bear Valley information station, 20 feet (6.09 m) from the parking 
lot, has a ramp and a 34-mch (86.36 cm) wide entrance. Adjoining rest- 
rooms have ramps with handrails, 45 inch (1 14.3 cm) entrances, 38 inch 
(96.52 cm) wide stall doors, and are equipped with bars. 

Nearest lodgings, restaurants and medical services are in Point 
Reyes Station, three miles (4.83 km) from Bear Valley headquarters, the 
nearest hospitals are at San Rafael and Petaluma, both 20 miles (32. 1 9 km) 
away. 



28 California 



Redwood National Park 

50 1 H Street, Drawer N 

Crescent City, California 9553 1 

(707)464-6101 

In a mixture of sun and log are coastaJ redwood lorests with virgin 

groves of ancient trees, including the world's tallest tree. The park also 

includes 40 miles (64.40 km) ol scenic Pacific coastline. 

U.S. 101 and 199 run the length of the park and have scenic drives 
with pulloffs and vista points. Information stations are at Crescent City 
and Orick. The Crescent City park headquarters and visitor center are 
entered from street parking at sidewalk level. The restroom is 60-mches 
(152.4 cm) square, the entry door is 33 inches (83.82 cm) wide. At the 
Orick information station, restroom facilities have 3-foot (0.91 m) wide 
doors. 

Summer campfire programs are presented in adjacent state parks, 
evening interpretive programs are presented at the headquarters in 
Crescent City. At Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park Museum, visitors 
in wheelchairs will need assistance up the three steps to the entry. 

Elk sometimes are visible to motorists on U.S. 101. Depending on 
weather, there is a passable road to Gold Bluffs Beach. In Jedediah 
Smith Redwoods State Park are excellent views of the redwoods from 
park roads. In Stout Grove, one short trail is accessible to visitors in 
wheelchairs. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park has Revelation Trail, 
a nature trail for visitors who are visually handicapped, providing Braille 
text description of the forest. 

Summer visits are recommended. Greyhound bus service is avail- 
able on U.S. 101 with stops only in Crescent City and in Eureka, 85 
miles (136.85 km) south of Crescent City, however, the most suitable 
transportation is by private automobile. The highest road elevation is 
1,000 feet (304.6 m). Restaurants, lodgings and medical services are 
available in Crescent City and Eureka. 



Sequoia National Park 

Three Rivers, California 9327 1 

(209) 565-9000 

Great groves of giant sequoias that are among the world's oldest living 

things, and Mount Whitney, at 14,495 feet (4,418.076 m) the highest 

mountain in the U.S. outside of Alaska, are spectacular attractions here 

m the High Sierra. 

Ash Mountain headquarters building, six miles (9.66 km) east of Three 
Rivers on California State Highway 198, and Lodgepole visitor center, 
20 miles farther on the park road, are fully accessible at ground level 
from paved parking. Restrooms are fully accessible. Both provide in- 
formation, publications, exhibits and audio-visual programs. Evening 
campfire programs at Lodgepole amphitheaters can be reached by paved 



California 29 



trail, and the General Sherman Tree trail is reached by paved trail with 

low incline. 

Most campgrounds with accessible restrooms and most overnight 

concessioner facilities can be reached by automobile. Lodging infor- 
mation is available at the visitor centers, but reservations for fully acces- 
sible lodgings should be made prior to the trip. Write or call Sequoia 
and Kings Canyon Hospitality Service, Sequoia National Park, Calif., 
93262, telephone (209) 565-3373. 

Weather and road conditions are best from May through October 
for visiting the park. Elevation on park roads ranges from 1,700 to 
7,000 feet (518.16 m) to 2,133.6 m). The nearest hospital is at Exeter, 
30 miles (48.3 km) west of Ash Mountain headquarters. Rental car service 
is at Visalia, 38 miles (60.8 km) west of headquarters on Route 198. 



Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 188, Whiskeytown, California 96095 
(916)241-6584 

Whiskeytown Lake, formed by a dam on Clear Creek in a scenic moun- 
tain region, is an excellent resource for water-related recreation. The 
area's other two units are administered by the Forest Service, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture. 

The lake is excellent for most water-oriented activities, such as swimming, 
boating and fishing. Picnicking, camping and sightseeing are also 
popular. Interpretive programs are given at campsites and at amphi- 
theaters. Visitors should check with the Overlook contact station for 
information about the programs. All of the nature trails are over rugged 
terrain. 

The Overlook contact station, which is the chief information center, 
is located at the intersection of State Route 299 and Kennedy Memorial 
Drive. At that center, restroom entry doors are 30 inches (76.20 cm) 
wide and the stall doors, 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide. The only other fully 
accessible restrooms are at the Dry Creek Group Campground on the 
west edge of the lake six miles (9.6 km) from the information center. 
These restrooms are 60 inches (152.4 cm) by 60 inches, with stall door 
widths 34 inches (86.36 cm) and full equipment. Reservations must be 
made for camping but the restrooms are available for transient visitors. 
Restrooms at Brandy Creek picnic area and also at the Brandy Creek 
marina have entry door widths of 29 inches (73.66 cm) and stall door 
widths of 22 inches (55.88 cm). At the Brandy Creek swim beach and at 
Oak Bottom swim beach restroom entry door widths are 34 inches 
(86.36 cm) and stall door widths are 22 inches (55.88 cm). 

The nearest restaurants, lodgings and medical services are in Redd- 
ing eight miles (12.88 km) to the east of the contact station. 



30 California 



Yosemite National Park 

P.O. Box 577, Yosemite National Park, California 95389 

(209)372-4461 

Granite peaks and domes rise high above broad meadows in the heart 

of the Sierra Nevada. Mountain lakes and sparkling waterfalls, including 

the Nation's highest, the world's three largest monoliths of exposed 

granite and three groves of giant sequoias find their place here. There is 

a "Living History" area at Wawona. 

The following buildings are accessible: Yosemite Valley visitor center, 
Happy Isles Trail Center (no ramp at front entrance, must be entered at 
rear), Pioneer Yosemite History and Transportation Centers, park head- 
quarters, Degnan's Village Store, Ansel Adams Gallery, Yosemite 
Lodge, Curry Village, Ahwahnee Hotel, which has an elevator, and 
Lewis Memorial Hospital (rear entrance). 

Behind the visitor center, a model Indian village is staffed by craft 
demonstrators during the summer and is accessible by surfaced road 
with interpretive signs and leaflet, both in large print. All overlooks are 
accessible, including Glacier Point. Audio-visual programs are accessible 
at the following sites: the visitor center, Happy Isles Trail Center and 
Pioneer Yosemite History and Transportation Centers. 

Shuttlebuses are not equipped to handle wheelchairs easily. Visitors 
with transportation problems should consult park officials. Some rest- 
rooms in North Pine and Lower Pines Campgrounds and in the visitor 
center are the only ones in the park equipped with grab bars and cur- 
tained booth doors. These restrooms are accessible by paved trails. 

Interpretive programs are offered throughout the park. Special 
interpretive programs are scheduled for groups by advance arrange- 
ment. Park signs and informational folders show both English and metric 
measurements. 

Road elevations range from 2,000 to almost 10,000 feet (608. m to 
almost 3040. m). 



Colorado 3 1 



Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site 

La Junta, Colorado 81050 

(303) 384-2596 

As a principal outpost of civilization on the Southern Plains in the early 

1800's and rendezvous for Indians, the post became the center of a vast 

fur-trading empire in the West. This is a "Living History" area. 

The recently completed reconstruction is partially accessible, restrooms 
are fully accessible, designed to accommodate wheelchairs. The parking 
lot is 1/4 mile (.4025 km) from the fort. An electric cart is available to 
transport visitors who need such assistance. 

The various rooms in the fort are furnished as exhibits, but the arti- 
facts exhibits are in cases in the historian's office temporarily. Audio- 
visual programs and interpretive talks are offered in the old trade room, 
and conducted tours are available on request. 

The nearest food, lodging and medical services are in La Junta, 7 
miles ( 1 1 .27 km) west on State Highway 1 94. 



Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument 

P.O.Box 1648 

Montrose, Colorado 81401 

(303)249-9661 

Shadowed depths of this sheer-walled canyon accentuate the darkness 

of ancient rocks of obscure origin. 

The monument is 11 miles (17.71 km) northeast of Montrose via U.S. 
50 and State Highway 347. Snack bar, souvenir stand, picnic areas, 
campgrounds and restrooms are all accessible on Route 50. 

The significant natural features can be enjoyed by car from road- 
ways and overlooks, several of which have interpretive devices. Inter- 
pretive talks are offered at the amphitheater. The conducted trips are 
very strenuous because the trails are rocky and unpaved. 

Elevation on the mam roads ranges from 7,500 to 8,500 feet 
(2,284.50 to 2,589. 10 m). The nearest food, lodging and medical services 
are available in Montrose. Restrooms at park headquarters on U.S. 
50 in Montrose are fully accessible. 



Colorado National Monument 

Fruita, Colorado 81521 

(303)858-3617 

Sheer-walled canyons, towering monoliths and weird formations reflect 

the action of time and weather on colorful sandstone here. 

The visitor center is 7 miles ( 1 1 .27 km) south of Fruita, 3 miles 4.83 km) 
off Colorado 340 The entrances and porch of the visitor center are 
accessible by steps or a long, sloping ramp from the parking lot. The 



32 Colorado 



distance from the parking lot to the steps is 72 feet (21.945 m); from the 
parking lot and up the ramp the distance is 140 feet (42.56 m). The porch 
at the rear of the visitor center offers a view of the canyons and sur- 
rounding countryside. 

Picnic areas, campgrounds with restrooms, most overlooks and 
some nature trails are also accessible. Most scenic pullouts along the 23- 
mile (37.01 km) Rim Rock Drive offer views from the car. Audiovisual 
programs and interpretive talks are offered at the visitor center and 
campfire programs are held at the amphitheater. 

Elevation on the main road ranges from 5,000 to 6,000 feet (1,524 
to 2,01 1.68 m). Restrooms at the visitor center are 29 inches (73.66 cm) 
wide with door open, stalls are 23 inches (58.42 cm) with doors open. 
The nearest substantial food, lodging and medical services are in Grand 
Junction 20 miles east of park headquarters via U.S. 70. Some facilities 
may be found in Fruita. 



Curecanti National Recreation Area 

P.O.Box 1040 

Gunnison, Colorado 81230 

(303)641-2337 

Stretching for 40 miles (64.0 km) along the Gunnison River are Blue 

Mesa Lake, Morrow Point Lake and Crystal Reservoir— components of 

the Curecanti unit of the Colorado River Storage project. 

The Elk Creek visitor center, 16 miles (25.76 km) west of Gunnison via 
U.S. 50, is on Blue Mesa Lake and is fully accessible. Observation points 
are all along U.S. 50, which runs the length of the area. At the visitor 
center are exhibits, interpretive talks, film strips and audiovisual pro- 
grams. A sloping ramp makes a U-turn around an observation fish pond 
in the lower level of the center, where various species of fish found in 
the river and lakes are on display. The amphitheater in the campground 
at Elk Creek visitor center is fully accessible by a gently sloping, hard- 
packed earth path. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Gunnison. The 
average elevation is 7,600 feet (2,3 1 6.48 m). 



Dinosaur National Monument 

Dinosaur, Colorado 81610 

(303)374-2216 

Spectacular canyons were cut by the Green and Yampa Rivers through 
unfolded mountains. A quarry contains fossil remains of dinosaurs and 
other ancient animals here on the Colorado-Utah border. 

The visitor center at park headquarters, Wz miles (2.41 km) east of 
Dinosaur on U.S. 40, is fully accessible from the parking area. Audio- 
visual programs are given here. Restrooms have 32j^ inch (82.55 cm) 
wide entry doors but stall doors are 22^ inches (57. 15 cm) wide. 



Colorado 33 



The lobby and exhibits on the ground floor of Dinosaur Quarry 
visitor center are accessible, but assistance will be needed to second- 
floor restrooms because of the ramp gradient of 12|/£ percent. The two 
main campgrounds in the Quarry area are readily accessible and rest- 
rooms are adequate. Permission will be given visitors in wheelchairs to 
drive their cars to the visitor center as the parking lot is a half mile 
(0.80 km) away. Arrangements can be made for assistance to visitors 
in boarding the guided shuttlebuses for the summer naturalist tours. 
Trips can be very dusty. Most scenic features can be viewed by car. The 
hiking trails are rugged and narrow. 

Elevations of the Canyon Country rim range from 7,500 to 7,800 
feet (2,284.50 to 2,375.88 m) and of the lower roads 4,700 to 6,000 feet 
(1,410 to 1,827.60 m). A full range of medical services, accessible accom- 
modations and restaurants will be found in Colorado at Rangely, 20 
miles (32.2 km) south of the park on Colorado Highway 64, and in Utah 
at Vernal, 20 miles (32.2 km) west of the Dinosaur Quarry visitor. center 
on U.S. 40. 



Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument 

Florissant, Colorado 8081 6 

(303)748-3253 

A wealth of fossil insects, seeds and leaves of the Ohgocene Period is 

preserved here in perfect detail. Here, too, is a remarkable display of 

standing petrified sequoia gigantea stumps. 

The temporary visitor center is an old ranchhouse 35 miles (56.35 km) 
west of Colorado Springs on U.S. 24. The center is accessible by ramp 
in the rear of the building, directly into the museum. The restrooms are 
small in the old structure, stalls in both men's and women's rooms are 
22-1/2 inches (57.15 cm) wide; entry to the men's room is 24 inches 
(60.96 cm) wide and to the women's room 22 inches (55.88 cm) wide. 

The self-guiding trail originating at the rear of the visitor center is 
relatively level, hard-packed gravel. The trail leads to the petrified 
sequoia display. Other fossil exhibits are in the museum. 

Elevation of the visitor center is 8,400 feet (2,560 m). The nearest 
medical clinic is 15 miles (24.1 km) east on U.S. 24 at Woodland Park. 
Other medical services and accessible lodgings and restaurants will 
be found in Colorado Springs. 



Great Sand Dunes National Monument 

P.O. Box 60 

Alamosa, Colorado 81101 

(303)378-2312 

Among the largest and highest in the United States, these dunes were 

deposited over thousands of years by southwesterly winds blowing 

through the passes of the lofty Sangre de Cristo Mountains. 



34 Colorado 



The visitor center is 37 miles (59.57 km) northeast of Alamosa on U.S. 
160. The center is reached by an 80-foot (24.38 m) concrete walk from 
the parking lot. Restroom entry doors in the visitor center are 29 inches 
(73.66 cm) wide and stall doors, 23-3/4 inches (60.325 cm). At the picnic 
area, the restroom entry doors are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide and the 
stall doors 24^ inches (62.23 cm). At the campground, the entry door 
width of restrooms is 29 inches (73.66 cm) and stall doors, 22 inches 
(55.88 cm). 

Double doors give access to the patio behind the center for a view 
of the dunes. A level concrete walk joins a 280-foot (85.29 m) paved 
trail ending in a viewpoint commanding an overall panorama of the 
dunes. Summer evening campfire talks are conducted in the amphi- 
theater, accessible by a slightly inclined asphalt trail. Specially conducted 
group tours are available by prior arrangement. 

Average elevation of the features is 8,200 feet (2,436.80 m). The 
nearest food, lodging and medical services are at Alamosa. 



Hovenweep National Monument 

c/o Mesa Verde National Park 

Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado 8 1 330 

(303) 529-4469 

Pre-Columbian Indians built these six groups of towers, pueblos and 
cliff dwellings, now preserved as a national monument in Colorado 
and Utah. 

The monument is 18 miles north of Cortez on Highway 666, and then 
west at Pleasant View, following a graded dirt road for 25 miles to 
Square Tower Group, Utah. 

The temporary visitor center is a shack with no visitor facilities. 
There is a campground with a modern comfort station. 

None of the ruins can be viewed from the developed area; they are 
accessible only after long and arduous hikes. The area is similar to 
Mesa Verde, which is much more accessible and has all the necessary 
facilities for visitors. 



Mesa Verde National Park 

Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado 81330 

(303) 529-4465 

These pre-Columbian cliff dwellings and other works of early man are 

the most notable and best preserved in the United States. 

The park entrance is 10 miles (16.01 km) east of Cortez on U.S. 160. 
The Far View visitor center is 15 miles (24.15 km) inside the park. All 
barriers have ramps and there are no stairs. The center provides infor- 
mation and has displays of Indian handicrafts. A large concessioner 
complex in the same area has a fully accessible lodge, gas stations, 



Colorado 35 



accessible guest rooms and restrooms. Conducted bus tours of the park 
begin from here. Reservations should be made for lodgings in the Far 
View Lodge with the Mesa Verde Company by toll-free telephone (800) 
525-5421. 

Five miles (8.05 km) within the park is the Morfield campground 
which has accessible restrooms, amphitheater and a campfire circle, 
and is reached by a level trail. 

Five miles (8.05 km) beyond the Far View visitor center is the park 
headquarters area which includes a fine archeological museum. The 
parking lot has designated spaces nearest to the museum; curbs have 
ramps and the walkway is paved. From the parking area, one can view 
the rums across the canyon. Also in this area are a small store and gift 
shop, open only in the summer, where picnic supplies can be purchased. 
In this area, interpretive talks are given and guided trips can be taken 
into the rums in the canyon over rough terrain during winter months. 
Trips are self-guiding during summer months. 

All major scenic overlooks, significant natural features and cliff 
dwellings may be seen by car. The mesa-top rums and their interpretive 
exhibits are accessible. 

Elevations on mam roads range from 6,800 feet (2,072.64 km) to 
8,600 feet (2,621.28 km). Average elevation of the mam features is 7,000 
feet (2, 1 33.6 m). The nearest full range of medical facilities is at Cortez. 



Rocky Mountain National Park and 
Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area 

Estes Park, Colorado 80517 
(303)586-2371 

The park's rich scenery, typifying the massive grandeur of the Rocky 
Mountains, is accessible by Trail Ridge Road which crosses the Con- 
tinental Divide. The park has more than 100 named peaks over 1 1,000 
feet (3,352.8 m). high and wildlife and wildflowers in 410 square miles 
(660. 1 sq. km) of the Rockies' Front Range. Shadow Mountain National 
Recreation Area, comprising Shadow Mountain Lake, Lake Granby and 
Willow Creek Reservoir, three units of the Colorado-Big Thompson 
project, adjoins the park at the southwest corner 

The park is entered from the east by U.S. 34/36 to Estes Park, and from 
the southwest by U.S. 34, to Grand Lake. 

All parking spaces at visitor centers have ramps where necessary 
and spaces have been designated at east and west entry visitor centers. 
Restrooms are fully accessible at the following areas: Park Headquarters 
and visitor center near Estes Park on the Trail Ridge Road in the eastern 
section; at the West Unit office near Grand Lake entrance; at the Alpine 
visitor center, near the highest point on Trail Ridge Road, just east of 
the Continental Divide. Comfort stations at the following points have 
fully accessible facilities: Rock Cut, Rainbow Curve and Sprague Lake. 
Plans are moving forward to provide at least one fully accessible rest- 



36 Colorado 



room at every major campground in the park and recreation area. 

The following facilities are fully accessible: Alpine visitor center and 
lunchroom/store at Fall River Pass; the lower floor of Moraine Park 
visitor center; the main entrance floor of the headquarters building, and 
the lower floor which is reached from parking lot in the back of the 
building; the Bear Lake information station; Granby Pumping Plant 
(tours using elevators); and the relief model in the West Side visitor center. 
The main entrance floor of the headquarters building has information/ 
sales counters and the lower floor has a relief map of the park and fre- 
quent showing of an orientation film. 

Bear Lake and tundra self-guiding nature trails are accessible except 
for six steps on Tundra Trail at 12,300 feet (3,746.58 m) elevation, and 
except, also, for crossing of a stream inlet at Bear Lake. Construction 
of a small bridge over the inlet is planned. Several interpretive roadside 
signs can be read from a parked car or adjacent sidewalk on Trail Ridge 
Road. An undulating paved walk of 200 yards (182.88 m) at 1 1,700-foot 
(3,563.82 m) elevation, leads from the parking area to Forest Canyon 
overlook. The old Fall River Road is now a motor nature trail and a 
self-guiding leaflet is available. Travel is westbound only and uphill. 

Illustrated programs are given by ranger naturalists at outdoor 
amphitheaters nightly in summer. Paved trails with easy grades lead to 
Glacier Basin, Moraine Park, Aspenglen and Stillwater amphitheaters. A 
steep, paved trail leads to Timber Creek amphitheater. Similar programs 
are provided at the headquarters auditorium. Access is through the rear 
door which has a ramp over four low steps. Glacier Creek picnic area 
is accessible and a smooth path leads to and part way around nearby 
Sprague Lake. 

Elevations along park roads range from 7,600 to 12,183 feet 
(2,314.96 to 3,710.94 m). Only the section of Trail Ridge Road from 
Hidden Valley to the east and lower elevation roads are open during 
the winter. 

A hospital is in Granby 14 miles (22.54 km) southwest of the Grand 
Lake entrance, just beyond the junction with U.S. 34. Medical services 
are also available in Estes Park. Accessible restaurants and. lodgings 
will be found in Estes Park at the Holiday Inn. 



Connecticut / District of Columbia 37 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



District of Columbia 



Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park 

(See Maryland) 



Ford's Theatre National Historic Site 

Theatre: 51 1 - 10th Street, N.W. 

Petersen House: 516- 10th Street, N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20004 

(202) 426-6924 

On April 14, 1865, President Lincoln was shot while attending a play 

at Ford's Theatre. He was carried across the street to the Petersen house, 

where he died the next morning. The Lincoln Museum at the theatre 

contains the Olroyd Collection of Lmcolmana, and depicts various 

phases of Lincoln's life. Live performances and interpretive programs 

are given in the theatre, and interpretive talks are also given m the House 

Where Lincoln Died. 

A parking garage is adjacent to the restored theatre. A 3-inch (7.35 cm) 
step from the sidewalk is the only barrier to the back of the theatre where 
there is ample space for visitors in wheelchairs, and a clear view of both 
theatre and stage. The restrooms are down a long flight of stairs. Access 
to the Petersen house is by a long, narrow flight of steps with handrails. 

A special tour can be arranged for visitors with visual handicaps. 
The tour includes the President's box where all furniture and appoint- 
ments can be handled. A sign language tour can also be arranged for 
visitors with hearing impairment. For special tour and ticket information 
call 426-6294. 

Ticket and performance information is available at the box office or 
by telephoning 347-6260. The museum and house are open 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. daily and weekends. The theatre closes at 1 p.m. Thursdays and 
Saturdays. 



38 District of Columbia 



Fort Dupont Park and Activity Center 

Minnesota Avenue and Randle Circle, S.E. 
Washington, D.C. 20019 
(202) 426-7723 

The Fort Dupont Park Center is designed for many types of recreational 
and community activities. 

The 375-acre (151.5 ha) park contains lighted basketball courts and 
football, baseball and softball fields, a year-round ice skating rink and 
picnic areas. Reservations for facilities should be made through D.C. 
Recreation, 673-7646. 

The visitor center is an old clubhouse, converted and accessible at 
ground level with no-barrier parking nearby. Restrooms have entry and 
stall doors 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide. Walkways are paved and at least 
48 inches ( 1 17.6 cm) wide, with moderate gradings. The center has non- 
slip floors. 

Guided tours, nature walks and talks and films are offered by prior 
arrangement. A park naturalist brings animals to the Center and gives 
informal interpretive talks on a regular schedule. During the summer, a 
day camp offers arts and crafts, games, ice skating and other programs, 
including visits to Oxon Hill Farm and to Anacostia Park for roller skating. 



Frederick Douglass Home 

1411 W Street, S.E. 
Washington, D.C. 20020 
(202)889-1736 

From 1877 to 1895 this was the home of the Nation's leading 19th- 
century black orator and U.S. Minister to Haiti in 1889. 

The house is located on a hill with a public parking lot at the bottom. 
Visitors with handicaps of mobility may drive to the home and park in 
the staff parking area at the rear of the building. The rear entrance has 
a ramp to provide access for visitors in wheelchairs. The comfort station 
is a portable, fully accessible restroom. The second floor of the home is 
reached by a steep, winding, long flight of stairs. 

Sign language interpretation and group conducted tours are pro- 
vided by advance arrangement. Written materials are available for self- 
conducted tours; informal interpretive talks are given at any time upon 
request. 

Visiting hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 



District of Columbia 39 



John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts 

Office: 2700 F Street, N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20566 

(202) 254-3850 

Site location: Rock Creek Parkway, overlooking the Potomac and 

Theodore Roosevelt Island 
(202) 254-3600 

The marble edifice, designed by Edward Durell Stone, is the sole official 
memorial in Washington, D.C, to the 35th President. It culminates an 
interest in a national cultural center dating back to George Washington. 

The Center houses three auditoriums — the Opera House, the Concert 
Hall and the Eisenhower Theatre — and the American Film Institute 
Theatre. 

A special box is reserved in each for patrons in wheelchairs. Tickets 
for aisle seats in the orchestra section may also be purchased by patrons 
able to move from wheelchair to theater seat. 

Elevators at each theater serve orchestra, box and balcony levels, 
and on request, the head usher will arrange for a wheelchair for those 
who wish to enter through a side entrance to avoid steps at the main 
entrance. 

Special restroom and telephone facilities are available on the orches- 
tra level of each theater for patrons in wheelchairs. Parking arrange- 
ments may be made in advance by calling the garage at (202) 659-9620. 

Sign language tours are conducted at 10 a.m. each Saturday. For 
information call (202) 254-3850. Guided tours are given from 10 a.m. 
to 1:15 p.m. daily. Rooftop talks are held at 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Monday 
through Friday and on the hour, 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 
Restaurants are located on the rooftop level and are reached by elevator. 



Lincoln Memorial 

c/o National Capital Region 
1100 Ohio Drive, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20242 
(202) 426-6895 or 6841 

At the foot of 23rd Street N. W., this classical structure features the 19- 
foot (5.79 m) marble seated statue of the Great Emancipator by Daniel 
Chester French. The architect of the building was Henry Bacon. Carved 
on the marble walls are Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and Second 
Ina ugural A ddress. 

Interpretive services are available from 8 a.m. to midnight daily. 

The memorial is at the west end of the Mall area. An elevator and 
access ramp have been installed as an alternate access to the 58 steps 
in the front of the memorial from sidewalk to the statue chamber. Rest- 
room facilities and drinking fountains are fully accessible. Both restrooms 
and elevator are accessible by a gradually sloping walkway with curb 



40 District of Columbia 



cuts at the street. Parking for visitors in wheelchairs is marked on the 
east side of the circle roadway. Tactile signs have been placed in the 
restrooms. Telephones are accessible. Audio and visual fire alarms have 
been installed. 

Sign language tours and other conducted tours can be arranged in 
advance of visit. 



Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac 

c/o George Washington Memorial Parkway 

Turkey Run Park 

McLean, Virginia 22101 

(703) 557-8990 

This memorial is dedicated to the 36th President of the United States, 

author of the New Conservation policy creating "the livable total 

environment. " 

The grove is in Lady Bird Johnson Park on the George Washington 
Memorial Parkway, west of 1-95 and 14th Street Bridge. The stone 
memorial and woodland trail are fully accessible. Parking is nearby at 
the Columbia Island Marina. 



National Capital Parks 

c/o National Capital Region 
1 100 Ohio Drive, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20242 
(202) 426-6700 

This park system m the Nation's Capital includes parks, parkways and 
reservations m the Washington metropolitan area, including such prop- 
erties as the Battleground National Cemetery, the President's Parks 
(Lafayette Park north of the White House and the Ellipse south of the 
White House), the parks flanking the Great Palls of the Potomac, a 
variety of military fortifications and greenswards. 

When Congress established a permanent National Capital m 1790, 
the city's Federal Commissioners were given the power "to purchase 
or accept such guantity of land as the President shall deem proper for 
the use of the United States. " Under this authority the Commissioners 
purchased Washington s first 17 public reservations and accepted dona- 
tions of other lands reguired for the street system of Pierre L'Enfant's 
city plan. Today more than 300 park units derive from these lands. The 
Office of Public Building and Public Parks of the National Capital was 
abolished and its public reservations were transferred to National Capital 
Parks, National Park Service, Aug. 10, 1933. 

For general information about the national parklands in the metropolitan 
area, call the Office of Public Affairs at (202) 426-6700 or Dial-A-Park at 
(202) 426-6975 for a recorded message of daily events in metropolitan 
Washington park areas. 



District of Columbia 4 1 



National Mall 

c/o National Capital Region 

1100 Ohio Drive, S.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20242 

(202) 426-6842 

Rows of stately elms mark the sweep of the greensward from the U.S. 

Capitol to the Washington Monument, a key feature of Pierre Charles 

L'Enf ant's Plan for the city of Washington in 1790. 

The Mall today includes various buildings of the Smithsonian 
Institution. The "mall area" as distinguished from the "mall" includes, 
for management purposes, the major memorials (Washington, Jefferson 
and Lincoln), Constitution Gardens and the Sylvan Theater, the Presi- 
dent's Parks (the Ellipse, the White House and Lafayette Park), West 
Potomac Park (including the Reflecting Pool, the polo field and the site 
of the Folklife Festivals) and the Tidal Basin. (The memorials and the 
White House are described separately in this book.) 

Over 100 curb cuts (or ramps) have been made in the mall area. Four 
fully accessible and equipped comfort stations and accessible drinking 
fountains are provided. These are near the Sylvan Theater (off Inde- 
pendence Avenue near 15th Street, S.W.), in West Potomac Park near 
the polo field; on the south side of the reflecting pool at the Folklife 
Festival site, in Constitution Gardens near the lake. The restrooms in the 
Ellipse and in Lafayette Park are inaccessible. 

Designated parking spaces are in the parking lot off Constitution 
Avenue on the Washington Monument grounds and on Madison and 
Jefferson Drives near entrances of the Smithsonian buildings. 

Constitution Gardens, between 17th Street and Lincoln Memorial 
on Constitution Avenue, was constructed to conform to American 
National Standards Institute (ANSI) requirements for accessibility, in- 
cluding accessible restrooms, curb cuts from Constitution Avenue and 
leveled curbs on both sides of the Tourmobile driveway, gentle incline 
grades and other specifications. 

For general information on the Mall, call the management office, 
Survey Lodge in the Washington Monument grounds off Independence 
Avenue, at 426-6842. 



National Visitor Center 

Union Station 
Washington, DC. 20002 
(202)532-5338 

The National Visitor Center, in restored Union Station at Massachusetts 
Avenue and First Street, N.E., encompasses a diverse complex of pro- 
grams and facilities to welcome visitors to the National Capital. 

The Visitor Center provides information, maps and printed material on 
the city. It has a National Bookstore, a fast-food restaurant, foreign 



42 District of Columbia 



language services, and a Discover America Hall of States. Its "Welcome 
to Washington" audio and visual program on the lower level can be 
seen and heard from the main floor. Two historical films are shown. 

Curb cuts have been made from the loading zone to the mam level; 
some drinking fountains and telephones have been made accessible; 
some restrooms are accessible. An information desk for visitors with all 
types of handicaps is manned at all times on the main level. 

The National Visitor Center is being converted into a totally acces- 
sible building. 



Old Stone House 

3051 M Street, N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20007 

(202)426-6851 

Old Stone House is a fine example of pre-Revolutionary architecture, 

and one of the oldest structures in the Nation s Capital. 

The house, in Georgetown, is on the city sidewalk with one small sill 
at the entry. Only commercial or on-street parking is available. No public 
restrooms are available. The second floor is reached by a narrow wind- 
ing stairway of 10 steps without a railing. The gardens are accessible. 

Interpretation is provided on the history and 18th-century life by 
staff members in period dress. Demonstrations of cooking, candle 
making, textile crafts and other domestic arts are given. 

Conducted tours for visitors with hearing impairment are given by 
pre-arrangement. Reproductions of historic items are available for touch- 
ing by visitors with visual impairment. On Saturday and Sunday after- 
noons a special program, "A Day in the Life of a Colonial Family," is 
presented. 



Rock Creek Park 

5000 Glover Road, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20015 
(202) 426-6833 

One of the largest urban parks in the world, this wooded preserve con- 
tains a wide range of natural, historical, cultural and recreational resources 
in the midst of metropolitan Washington, D. C. 

Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway runs through the city from the north 
city line (Western Avenue) to West Potomac Park. The park itself ex- 
tends from the north District line to the confluence of Rock Creek and 
the Potomac River, a distance of four miles (6.44 km), and is composed 
of 1,754 acres (710 ha). Potomac Parkway continues the parkway along 
the banks of the Potomac to West Potomac Park. 

The park contains foot and bicycle trails and bridle paths, the Na- 
tional Zoological Park, the Rock Creek Nature Center, a public golf 



District of Columbia 43 



course, the Art Barn, Peirce Mill, Carter Barron Amphitheatre, several 
historic sites and many picnic areas. 

Rock Creek Nature Center, located at Military and Glover Roads, 
NW, (202) 426-6828, is designed to provide an understanding and 
appreciation of the natural world, as exemplified in Rock Creek 
Park. The Center and the planetarium in the center building are 
fully accessible as are the restrooms. Construction is in progress to 
provide access to the auditorium in the lower level of the center down 
a moderate slope to the rear of the center, with ramps as needed. 

Short guided walks and animal demonstrations, principally 
with rescued, indigenous animals, are available at the center. 
Special interpretive programs are also available by arrangement for 
groups with hearing, visual and other disabilities. 

Peirce Mill, a 19th-century grist mill, is located at Park Road and 
Tilden Street, N.W., (202) 426-6908. Entry is at ground level to the 
first floor, and by portable ramp and with assistance to the base- 
ment level. 

This is a "Living History" area and demonstrations of corn 
grinding by wooden machinery and water power are given. Guided 
tours of the mill and living history demonstrations are given by 
appointment for groups of visitors with visual, hearing and other 
disabilities. 

Nearby is the Art Barn, a gallery for exhibiting works by local 
artists. 

Carter Barron Amphitheater in Rock Creek Park at 16th Street 
and Colorado Avenue, box office (202) 829-3200, was built in 1950 
for the staging of the Paul Green symphonic drama, "Faith of Our 
Fathers," in observance of the sesquicentennial celebration of the 
founding of the city of Washington, D.C. It was then turned over to 
the National Park Service. 

Gently sloping, paved walkways connect the parking lot and 
the amphitheater. Because of the distance, persons with mobility 
disabilities may park near the box office entrance gate where the 
curb has a ramp. The two side aisles, 34 inches (86.36 cm) wide, are 
accessible but the slope to the seating areas is very steep. Alterna- 
tive seating at the rear and along the aisles can be arranged by 
calling ahead to the box office. Telephones are at universal height 
and entries to restrooms have ramps. The entry doors are 35 inches 
(88.90 cm) wide, and stall doors are 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. 
Snack bars are accessible. 



44 District of Columbia 



Sewall-Belmont House National Historic Site 

144 Constitution Avenue, N.E. 
Washington, D.C. 20002 
(202)546-1210 

Rebuilt after fire damage from the War of 1812, this red brick house is 
one of the oldest on Capitol Hill It has been the National Women's 
Party headquarters since 1929 and commemorates the party's founder 
and women's suffrage leader, Dr. Alice Paul, and her associates. Alice 
Paul was a leading advocate and activist in the women's rights move- 
ment. Her enthusiasm and efforts were instrumental in securing passage 
of the Constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote and 
also passage by Congress of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment. 

In addition, the house has historic significance as the residence of 
Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Jefferson and 
Madison, and is believed to be the site of the only active resistance to 
the British Army during their march on Washington after the Battle of 
Bladensburg in 1814. The property dates back to an original land grant 
m 1632 to Cecihus Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore. 

The house is open to the public weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., week- 
ends and holidays, noon to 4 p.m., throughout the year. There are no 
public restrooms and the entry and access to upper floors and to the 
library (between the floors) is by steep flights of steps. 

Restoration is in progress and the schedule of visiting hours may 
be changed from time to time on that account. Persons should check in 
advance to verify visiting hours. 



Theodore Roosevelt Island 

c/o George Washington Memorial Parkway 
Turkey Run Park 
McLean, Virginia 22101 
Site telephone: (202) 426-6922 

On this wooded island nature sanctuary in the Potomac River, trails lead 
to an imposing 17-foot (5.19 m) statue of Roosevelt, the conservation- 
mmded 26th President. His tenets on nature, manhood, youth and the 
State are inscribed on 21 -foot (6.39 m) tablets. The memorial was de- 
signed by Eric Tugler,- the statue was sculptured by Paul Manship. 

The island is off George Washington Memorial Parkway northbound 
from Roosevelt Bridge. The parking lot is unpaved and the temporary 
loose-graveled causeway presents difficulties. A fully accessible pedes- 
trian bridge will be constructed with completion anticipated in 1978. 

Pamphlets are available describing the memorial, the human history 
and natural features of the island. The 2-1/2 miles (4.025 km) of packed 
earth or wood-chipped foot trails are level for the most part, and some- 
what hilly and bumpy, in the northern section. Walks, conducted by 
interpreters, highlight the natural and historic features of the island. 



District of Columbia 45 



Restrooms are 1/4 mile (0.4025 km) from the end of the causeway 
and the memorial. The location, privacy walls, steps and dimensions of 
the current facilities present difficulties for visitors with mobility impair- 
ment. Plans are under consideration to relocate the comfort stations on 
the mainland near the parking area. The new restrooms will be fully 
accessible and equipped. 



Thomas Jefferson Memorial 

c/o National Capital Region 
1100 Ohio Drive, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20242 
(202) 426-6822 

Located on the South Bank of the Tidal Basin, this circular, colonnaded 
structure, in the classic style introduced in this country by Jefferson, 
memorializes the author of the Declaration of Independence and Presi- 
dent from 1801 to 1809. On the interior walls are carved four excerpts 
from Jefferson's writings. The heroic bronze statue of Jefferson was 
sculptured by Rudulph Evans. Architects were John Russell Pope and 
associates Otto Eggers and Daniel Higgins. The memorial was dedicated 
on April 13, 1 943 on the 200th anniversary of Jefferson s birth. Surround- 
ing the memorial and the Tidal Basin are cherry trees that the city of 
Tokyo presented to the city of Washington m 1912. 

Interpretive services are available from 8 a.m. to midnight all year. 

An elevator and ramps have been installed from grade level to the 
rotunda, making the memorial fully accessible. Tactile signs have been 
placed in the restrooms. The fully accessible restrooms and drinking 
fountains are on the grade level. Telephones are 48 inches (117.6 cm) 
above the floor. Audio and visual fire alarms have been installed. The 
parking lot has designated spaces and curb cuts. 



Washington Monument 

c/o National Capital Region 

1100 Ohio Drive, S.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20242 

(202) 426-6839 or 6841 

This 5 5 5- foot (168.99 m) obelisk honoring George Washington is a 

dominating feature of the Nation's Capital The monument, opened to 

the public in 1888, is on the Mall at Constitution Avenue and 15th Street, 

N.W. The architect-designer was Robert Mills. 

The monument is accessible by elevator to the 500-foot (152.25 m) level. 
Return is by elevator or down the 898 steps from which the 1 90 memorial 
stones on the walls can be viewed. The window levels, however, are too 
high for children and for visitors in wheelchairs without assistance. The 
National Park Service is considering ways to make it easier for all 
visitors to use the windows. 



46 District of Columbia 



The nearest parking is in the 1 6th Street parking lot on Constitution 
Avenue, about 150 yards (137.025 m) from the base of the monument. 
Designated spaces are near curb cuts in the lot close to the paved path 
to the monument. The path has a steep (close to 8.33 percent) grade with 
no rest areas. Plans are being considered for level, benched areas on the 
path. A steep curb ramp is at the end of the path at the base of the 
monument. A service roadway runs around the monument. 

On the east side (front) of the monument, curb cuts are on both sides 
of the roadway. Curb cuts on the sidewalks are on 15th Street near the 
loading zone of the Tourmobile, but the path from 1 5th Street to the base 
of the monument is steep, although short. The Tourmobile is accessible 
only with assistance. 

Restrooms designed to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs are 
on the southeast side of the monument near the Sylvan Theater. Entrance 
doors are 34 inches (86.36 cm) wide and stall doors are 32 inches (81 .28 
cm) wide. The path to the comfort stations is level and paved. 



White House 

c/o National Capital Region 

1 100 Ohio Drive, S.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20242 

(202) 426-6622 

This has been the residence and office of the Presidents of the United 

States since November 1800. The cornerstone was laid October 13, 

1792 on the site selected by George Washington and included in the 

L'Enfant Plan. The building was renovated between 1949-52. 

Persons physically unable to wait in line for tours of the White House 
should go directly to the northeast gate for prompt admittance. Wheel- 
chairs are available. From the northeast gate and throughout the lower 
floor of the White House and the grounds, all paths and floors are fully 
accessible, with ramps as needed. 

Conducted tours for special groups can be arranged by writing 
the visitor services in the White House, and general information may be 
obtained by calling 456-2200. 



Florida 47 



Big Cypress National Preserve 

P.O.Box 1247 
Naples, Florida 33940 
(813) 262-1066 or 1173 

Adjoining the northwest section of Everglades National Park, this large 
area provides a freshwater supply crucial to the park's survival. Sub- 
tropical plant and animal life abounds in this ancestral home of the 
Seminole and Miccosukee Indians. 

There are no public facilities in this new area. Less than half of the author- 
ized land area has been acquired. Maps and printed general information 
about national preserves in the National Park System, as well as general 
information about the biological and cultural nature of the Big Cypress 
area are available at the park management office. 

Park headquarters is at Room 304, 850 Central Avenue, Naples. 
The building is fully accessible at ground level. An elevator is available 
inside the building to reach the park office. 



Biscayne National Monument 

P.O.Box 1369 
Homestead, Florida 33030 
(305) 247-2044 

Biscayne National Monument, for the most part, is reef and water, but 
within its boundaries, about 25 keys, or islands, form a north-south chain, 
with Biscayne Bay on the west and the Atlantic Ocean on the east. The 
monument contains a significant example of living coral reef. Most of the 
shoreline on both mainland and keys is exposed, rough coral rock. 

Headquarters is located 8 miles (12.88 im) east of Homestead city limits, 
on North Canal Drive. The building has an information room and small 
exhibits. The headquarters area, the boat-launching ramp, and part of 
the jetty are accessible. Restrooms have entry doors 29 inches (73.66 
cm) wide and stall doors are 32 inches (8 1 .28 cm) wide. 

Except for the headquarters on the mainland, the monument is 
accessible only by boat, and visitors must make their own arrangements 
as no public boat transportation is available. The mainland site and the 
jetty offer a pleasant view of Biscayne Bay and opportunities for fishing, 
birdwatching and relaxing. 



Canaveral National Seashore 

P.O. Box 2583 

Titusville, Florida 32780 

(305) 867-4675 

Immediately north of the Kennedy Space Center, the seashore offers a 

great variety of wildlife, including many species of birds, on a segment of 

largely undeveloped wild lands. The area includes a portion of 140,393- 



48 Florida 



acre (56,718.772 ha) Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, adminis- 
tered by Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. 

All lands within Apollo State Park and Turtle Mound State Archeological 
Site are now under the administration of Canaveral National Seashore. 
The 25 miles (40.25 km) of shoreline incorporated in the national sea- 
shore are located between New Smyrna Beach on the north and the 
Kennedy Space Center on the south. 

Canaveral is the newest in a chain of national seashores extending 
along the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Coasts. Limitations on 
physical development and a prohibition of vehicular traffic on the beach 
were written into the legislation establishing the seashore. 

Park headquarters is 7 miles (1 1.27 km) east of Titusville on State 
Route 402. The temporary headquarters complex is a group of trailers. 
One of the trailers has been redesigned to provide fully accessible rest- 
rooms. 

The seashore is accessible only from the south and north ends. Most 
of the facilities are in the south end of the park. The road from Titusville 
continues to the Atlantic beach, 5 miles (8.05 km) beyond the visitor 
center complex, then 5 miles (8.05 km) north along the beach, with 
many overlooks along the way. One boardwalk, #7 on the Playa Alinda 
Beach, can be reached directly from the parking lot. The beach all along 
the south end is of soft sand and dunes. 

The visitor center provides map exhibits and books on coastal 
vegetation, flora and fauna. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge is 
1 mile (1.61 km) west of the park entrance, and has a self-guiding motor 
nature trail. 



Castillo de San Marcos National Monument 

1 Castillo Drive 

St. Augustine, Florida 32084 

(904) 829-6507 

Construction of this oldest masonry fort in the continental United States 

was started in 1672. The Spanish sought to protect St. Augustine, the 

first permanent settlement by Europeans m what is now the continental 

United States (1565). 

The entire ground floor of the Castillo is accessible from the parking 
area. The entrance walk from the parking area to the courtyard inside 
the fort is on a moderate slope. Restrooms are fully accessible and 
equipped, and a drinking fountain at the proper height has been installed. 
Some museum exhibit rooms on the courtyard have 2-inch (5.08 cm) 
sills, but assistance is available if needed. 

The conducted tours — except for the tour to the gundeck which is 
reached by 45 steps — and the several interpretive markers and audio 
stations are all accessible. Some living history demonstrations are offered 
at the courtyard. 



Florida 49 



De Soto National Memorial 

P.O. Box 1377, 75th Street, N.W. 

Bradenton, Florida 33506 

(813)792-0458 

The landing of Spanish explorer Hernando De Soto in Florida in 1539 

and the first extensive organized exploration of what is now the southern 

United States by Europeans are commemorated here. This is a "Living 

History" area. 

The monument is in Bradenton, 30 miles (48.3 km) south of Tampa on 
U.S. 41, at the intersection with Manatee Avenue, which runs through the 
park. The visitor center and auditorium are accessible from the parking 
lot by a short, paved walk with no steps. Restrooms have entry doors 
3 1 inches (78.74 cm) wide and stall doors are 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. 
The visitor center has audiovisual programs and exhibits and offers 
a 22-minute movie on De Soto. Living history demonstrations are given 
near the visitor center. A 1/2-mile (0.80 km) interpretive trail of packed 
shell and sand may present difficulties for visitors in small-tired wheel- 
chairs but is negotiable with assistance. 



Everglades National Park 

P.O. Box 279 

Homestead, Florida 33030 

(305)247-6211 

77ms largest subtropical wilderness m the coterminous United States 

has extensive freshwater and saltwater areas, open Everglades prairies 

and mangrove forests. Abundant wildlife includes rare and colorful 

birds. This is the third largest national park and a "Living History" area. 

Park headquarters and the Parachute Key visitor center are about 10 
miles (16.1 km) southwest of Homestead on Florida 27 which becomes 
the mam park road. The visitor center parking lot has a curb ramp on 
the north side, and access to the center is by ramps not exceeding a 5- 
percent grade. Telephones, drinking fountains and restrooms have all 
been modified to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. 

Modifications of essential facilities are underway throughout the 
park and will be completed by December 1977. The visitor center has 
exhibits, audiovisual and motion picture programs, and a desk for sale 
of interpretive material, all accessible on the mam floor. 

Flamingo is a major recreation area. The Flamingo marina, coffee 
bar, store, lounge, auditorium and the lower level of the Shark Valley 
observation tower are all accessible. The Flamingo visitor center has a 
10-percent grade ramp to the second floor where many of the programs 
are given. The coffee shop and dining room in the open breezeway are 
also reached by this ramp. All essential facilities have been modified to 
accommodate visitors in wheelchairs, but assistance may be needed on 
the steeper grade ramps. 



50 Florida 



The following areas are fully accessible: Long Pine Key camp- 
ground; Flamingo campgrounds and picnic areas, and Paurotis Pond 
picnic areas. The following trails are fully accessible: Anhmga and 
Gumbo Limbo at Royal Palm; Pinelands; Mahogany Hammock; and 
West Lake. Most trails are loops, less than 1/2 mile (0.8 km) long and 
are either boardwalk or hard surfaced. 

The following programs are offered: audiovisual programs at 
Flamingo auditorium; daytime interpretive talks at Flamingo, conducted 
trips at Royal Palm and Flamingo, and evening programs at Long Pine 
Key and Flamingo. These programs are offered only in season, Nov. 15 
to April 15. The conducted trip by tram (accessible) to Shark Valley 
observation tower is the only program in the park offered year-round. 

Reservations for the fully accessible guest rooms in the Flamingo 
Lodge (open all year) should be made well in advance with The Ever- 
glades Park Catering, Flamingo, Florida 33030, (305) 253-3241. 

The nearest full range of medical services is at Homestead, 48 miles 
(77.28 km) from Flamingo, 10 miles (16.1 km) from headquarters. 



Fort Caroline National Memorial 

12713 Fort Caroline Road 

Jacksonville, Florida 32225 

(904)641-7155 

Fort Caroline overlooks the site of a French Huguenot colony of 1564- 

65, the second French attempt at settlement in the present United States. 

Here, the French and Spanish began two centuries of European colonial 

rivalry in North America. 

At present, the visitor center entry presents difficulties because of many 
steps. Assistance is given visitors in wheelchairs. The present restrooms 
are inadequate but modifications are underway through construction 
of a long ramp to the entry and by remodeling to provide fully accessible 
restrooms. Completion is expected by early 1978. 

In the visitor center, the exhibits and museum are fully accessible. 
The reconstructed fort is 1/4 mile (0.40 km) from the visitor center. The 
crushed-shell path to the fort descends a steep 23 feet (7.01 m). A wheel- 
chair with pneumatic tires is available on loan for trail use. 

The Ribault Column overlook, on the St. Johns River, is reached by 
automobile. The column is eight steps above the parking area sidewalk. 



Fort Jefferson National Monument 

c/o U.S. Coast Guard Base 

Key West, Florida 33040 

(305)247-6211 

Fort Jefferson, built in 1856 to help control the Florida Straits, is the 

largest all-masonry fortification in the Western world. It is the central 

feature of the seven Dry Tortugas Islands and the surrounding shoals 



Florida 5 1 



and waters of the Gull of Mexico, some 75 square miles (120.75 km) that 
make up the national monument. 

The fort, which served as a Federal military prison during and after 
the Civil War, occupies almost all of Garden Key, 70 miles (1 12.65 km) 
west of Key West, Fla. Though off the beaten track, the monument is 
famous for its bird and marine life, and Bush and Long Keys are pro- 
tected nesting grounds for the noddy and sooty terns. (The sooty terns 
gather on Bush Key for their nesting season of May to September.) 

Garden Key can be reached only by boat or seaplane. Exit from the 
aircraft to the seaplane concrete ramp will present difficulties for visitors 
with mobility handicaps but can be managed with assistance. Between 
the seaplane ramp and the fort are a concrete roadway and hard-packed 
sand walkways. Arrival by boat is less difficult. Regular cruise service 
from accessible docks in Key West to the accessible dock on Garden 
Key is available during the summer months. Commercial transportation 
services are listed in the Key West telephone directory. 

A 400-foot (121.8 m) wooden ramp connects the boat dock with 
the fort. Ramps cross the one-step entrance to the fort and another step 
into the visitor center inside the fort. Walkways throughout the fort are 
of brick and the ground floor is fully accessible. The ramparts are 
reached by narrow spiral stone stairs. Exhibits and an audiovisual 
orientation slide program are offered in the fort. 

Restrooms in the fort present difficulties. The entry door of the men's 
restroom is 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide and of the women's restroom, 30 
inches (76.20 cm) wide, but entry into each is impeded by a privacy 
partition close to the entry door requiring a sharp right-hand turn. 
Plans are underway for new dock and restroom facilities, completion 
is estimated for 1979. 

Grills and picnic tables are provided and camping is permitted in 
the grassed picnic area. Assistance may be needed over patches of 
sand from walkways to the grassed areas. Snorkeling and scuba diving 
are allowed. Salt-water sport fishing is good most of the year and no 
fishing license is required. Regulations can be obtained from park 
personnel at the fort. Since the Dry Tortugas are isolated, visitors must 
bring in water, food and supplies. No lodgings are available in the monu- 
ment. 



Fort Matanzas National Monument 

c/o Castillo de San Marcos National Monument 

1 Castillo Drive 

Saint Augustine, Florida 32084 

(904) 829-5522 

This Spanish fort was built m 1740-42 to protect St. Augustine from the 

British. 

The visitor center is on Anastasia Island, 14 miles (22.53 km) south of 



52 Florida 



St. Augustine on Florida Highway A1A. The walk between the paved 
parking area sidewalk and the pier behind the visitor center is accessible. 
The musuem exhibits are in a very small room in a breezeway, with a 
narrow door and one step unsuitable for a ramp. Wayside exhibits 
in the breezeway, however, are accessible. On the pier, a good view, 
an audio station, two wayside exhibits and an interpretive marker de- 
scribing the fort, are all accessible. Care must be taken on the pier as 
the boards are laid lengthwise with small gaps between. 

The fort, on Rattlesnake Island, can be seen from the pier, but is 
difficult to reach because of tidal docking problems and small steps and 
seating arrangements in the 1 1 -passenger T-Craft used in the crossing. 
Most living history demonstrations are conducted at the fort. 

The walks are of cochma (shell) and random-set flagstone and are 
a bit rough. Both restrooms have a small 4-inch (10.16 cm) entry step 
unsuitable for ramps because ramps would create a safety hazard in 
the narrow breezeway. Entry doors are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide and 
stall doors are 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide. 



Gulf Islands National Seashore 

P.O.Box 100 

Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561 
(904) 932-5302 

This series of offshore islands and keys has both historic forts and spark- 
ling white sand beaches near Pensacola, Fla., and Pascagoula and 
Biloxi, Miss., with mainland facilities in both states. 

Private auto travel is possible in all sections except the Mississippi off- 
shore islands. U.S. 90 and 98 are good sight-seeing highways that 
partially follow the shoreline. They connect with U.S. 10. On U.S. 10 in 
Florida, close to the Alabama state line, fully accessible comfort stations 
have been constructed in the rest area. No problem should be en- 
countered in finding accessible restaurants, lodging and medical serv- 
ices in major urban centers along the entire 150-mile (241.40 km) route 
from Ship Island, Miss, to Santa Rosa Island, Fla 

Florida section. Headquarters and a small museum are housed in 
temporary quarters at Fort Pickens on Santa Rosa Island near 
Pensacola, Fla. The building is entered by ramp at a steep incline. 
Exterior doors of the restrooms are 36 inches (91.44 cm) wide and 
stall doors are 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. Curbs have been re- 
moved for access to the Fort Pickens picnic pavilion and fishing 
pier and at the Johnson Beach picnic pavilion on Perdido Key. 
Fully accessible and equipped restrooms are under construction 
in the Santa Rosa day-use area near Navarre Beach. 

Bridges connect both Santa Rosa Island and Perdido Key with 
the mainland. Within the Fort Pickens section, Blackbird Marsh 
Nature Trail provides a level walk with benches for resting, the 



Florida 53 



museum and the interpretive center (called the Sandbox) are acces- 
sible by ramp. Upon request, park personnel will give special inter- 
pretive talks. 

Mississippi section. The interpretive center, the fishing pier and 
boat dock at Davis Bayou in Ocean Springs on the mainland, are 
fully accessible at ground level. In the day-use area picnic sheds 
with built-in grills, restrooms and showers are also fully accessible. 
The phone number for information about the Davis Bayou area is 
(601)875-9057. 

The three offshore islands, at distances ranging from 7 miles 
( 1 1 .27 km) to 1 2 miles ( 1 9.32 km) from the mainland, are reached by 
concessioner-run boats. Boarding and leaving the tour boats can 
present difficulties because of tidal docking problems, but assis- 
tance is available. The single-use restrooms are on the mam deck. 
Entry doors are 28 inches (71.12 cm), but a 4-mch (10.16 cm) thres- 
hold presents problems. However, assistance is available. 

The run to Ship Island is 1 1/2 hours for day-use only. Many 
recreational opportunities and accessible facilities are here. A board- 
walk runs across the island 1/2 mile (0.80 km) wide. Boards are 
laid cross-wise and easily negotiated. Restrooms have 36-inch (91.44 
cm) doors at entry and on stalls. Picnic areas are accessible, with 
little assistance, in shade shelters with designated spaces nearest 
the boardwalk. The patio and first floor of Fort Massachusetts, 
used during the Civil War, are accessible by ramps, but the top of 
the fort is reached only by a narrow, spiral stairway. The beach at 
the end of the boardwalk is accessible with a little assistance, and 
lifeguards are on duty. 



54 Georgia 



Andersonville National Historic Site 

Andersonville, Georgia 31711 

(912)924-0343 

This Civil War prisoner-of-war camp commemorates the sacrifices borne 

by Union prisoners in the 1861-65 conflict and by American prisoners of 

all other wars in which the United States has engaged. The site includes 

the Andersonville National Cemetery. 

The visitor center, an old Army chapel building, is on Georgia 49, 10 
miles (16.1 km) northeast of Americus. Ramps cover the four steps to 
the entry, but some assistance will be required on the steep 36-mch 
(91.44 cm) rise in 41 feet (12.464 m). The restrooms are modified to 
provide accessible facilities for visitors in wheelchairs. 

The visitor center has exhibits and audiovisual programs in a room 
with designated spaces. All features in the prison site and the cemetery 
are visible and most are accessible by level negotiable trails. 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Ga.-Tenn. 

P.O. Box 2126 

Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia 3074 1 
(404)866-9241 

This park includes the Civil War battlefields of Chickamauga, Chatta- 
nooga, Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. The park lies in 
Georgia and Tennessee. This is a "Living History" area. 

The headquarters and visitor center are on U.S. 27, off 1-75, 10 miles 
south of Chattanooga, Tennessee. At the front entrance there are two 
low steps from the street level to the porch and one additional step into 
the building. Visitors in wheelchairs may enter from the parking area 
via the breeze way over a portable ramp. The exhibit rooms are fully 
accessible and equipped restrooms are on the ground floor, but the 
audiovisual program on the second floor is accessible only by a flight 
of steps. 

Most of Chickamauga Battlefield (in Georgia) can be visited by 
automobile. Wayside exhibits and printed materials provide the inter- 
pretation. Point Park on Lookout Mountain (in Tennessee and Georgia), 
overlooking the site of "The Battle Above the Clouds," is accessible, but 
there is a drop of 20 feet (6.09 m) in a distance of 150 yards (137.16 m) 
on the blacktop walkway to the Chattanooga overlook. 



Georgia 55 



The Ochs Museum at the Chattanooga overlook contains pictures 
of individuals engaged in the battle, an electric map showing troop 
movements and an audio program. Living history demonstrations are 
given at both the battlefield and at Point Park. The world's best collection 
of shoulder arms, the Fuller gun collection, is in the visitor center. 



Cumberland Island National Seashore 

P.O. Box 806 

Saint Marys, Georgia 31558 

(912)882-4336 

Magnificent beaches and dunes, marshes and freshwater Jakes make up 

the largest of Georgia s Golden Isles, one of the finest remaining natural 

areas on the East Coast. 

The temporary headquarters and visitor center are on U.S. 40, which 
ends at the St. Marys River. The center has fully accessible restrooms. 
Information on the new area and tickets for the boat trip to the island 
can be obtained here. The boat makes five daily 45-minute crossings a 
week. It carries 150 passengers and is accessible but only with assist- 
ance, due to the tidal-docking problems. Restrooms on the boat are 
inadequate. 

The visitor center on the island is accessible with assistance over 
four steps to the porch. The single-use restrooms have 30-inch (76.20 
cm) wide entry doors. 

The 2-mile (3.22 km) walking tour to the Dungeness Rums complex 
and the beach is over a difficult nature trail. Visitors are picked up at 
the end of the walk for return to the visitor center by an electric tram with 
passengers sitting in narrow seats, face to face, two abreast, and with no 
space to carry wheelchairs. 



Fort Frederica National Monument 

Route 4, Box 286-C 

St. Simons Island, Georgia 31522 

(912)638-3639 

Gen. James E. Oglethorpe built this British fort in 1736-48, during the 

Anglo-Spanish struggle for control of what is now the southeastern 

United States. 

The visitor center is 12 miles (19.32 km) north of the Brunswick-St. 
Simons Causeway. The curb around the parking area has been cut and 
a designated space is adjacent to the cut. Assistance may be required 
for visitors in wheelchairs to surmount the five steps at the visitor center 
entry. The restrooms have been modified to provide full accessiblity. 

The trail through old Frederica to the fort ruins is of grass and 
gravel, but can be negotiated. This trail has markers, exhibit cases and 
pushbutton audio messages and passes the ruins of early settlers' 
houses. Other trails are paved and provide easy access to the area where 
living history demonstrations are given. A movie is presented in the 
auditorium. 



56 Georgia 



Fort Pulaski National Monument 

P.O. Box 98 

Savannah Beach, Georgia 3 1 328 
(912)786-5787 

Bombardment of this early 19th-century fort by Federal rifled cannon in 
1862 first demonstrated the ineffectiveness of old-style masonry forti- 
fications. 

The visitor center is 15 miles (24.15 km) east of Savannah on U.S. 80 in 
the delta area of the Savannah River. The visitor center is entered over 
five steps. The restroom entry doors are 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide and 
stall doors are 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. The restrooms are entered at 
right angles from a narrow corridor. Plans are underway for an entry 
ramp and to renovate the restrooms wherever possible. The fort rest- 
rooms are similarly inadequate but renovation is planned. 

The grounds of the fort are accessible but assistance may be re- 
quired over the ramp through the sallyport. Within the fort, some exhibit 
rooms are separated by minor barriers, such as small steps or high 
thresholds, all of which can be negotiated with the help of portable 
ramps. The doors of some of the rooms are too narrow to admit wheel- 
chairs. 

All trails are surfaced, including one nature trail and trails over the 
dikes. In the picnic area, 1/4 mile (.4025 km) from the visitor center on 
the park road, some tables can accommodate wheelchairs. Living history 
demonstrations are given at the fort and parade grounds. Interpretive 
talks are given at both the visitor center and in the fort; exhibits and arti- 
facts that can be touched are in the visitor center and fort. 



Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park 

P.O.Box 1167 

Marietta, Georgia 30060 

(404) 427-4686 

Two engagements took place here between Union and Confederate 

forces during the Atlanta Campaign, June 20-July 2, 1864. 

The headquarters and visitor center are on Old U.S. 41 at its junction 
with Stilesboro Road, 3 miles (4.83 km) north of Marietta, and 15 miles 
(24. 1 5 km) northwest of Atlanta, off 1-75. 

A ramp provides easy access from the nearby parking area to the 
single-level visitor center. Living history programs are featured on the 
visitor center lawn during the summer months. The visitor center offers 
an audiovisual program and exhibits. Braille park folders are available 
on a loan basis. Restrooms have entry doors 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide 
and modified, curtained stalls 30 inches (76.20 cm) wide. 

The Mountain Road has scenic overlooks, but the observation point 
at the top of the mountain is inaccessible to visitors in wheelchairs be- 
cause of rugged terrain. Cheatham Hill, the Kolb Farm and the picnic 



Georgia 57 



areas are all accessible. An audio taped message is available at the Kolb 
Farm. Hiking trails throughout the park range from easy to difficult; 
some are level and some are steep and rough. 



Ocmulgee National Monument 

PO. Box 4186 

Macon, Georgia 31208 

(912)742-0447 

The cultural evolution of the Indian mound-builder civilization in the 

southern United States is represented m the remains of mounds and 

villages here. 

The visitor center is near the east side of Macon, at the intersection of 
U.S. 80 and State 129. The center is accessible by ramp from the park- 
ing lot in front of the center. The entry doors of the restrooms are 28 
inches (71.12 cm) wide and the stalls are 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide. The 
two-room museum in the visitor center has relief maps and 47 exhibit 
cases. Some artifacts are taken out of the cases by interpreters to be 
touched by visitors who are visually handicapped. 

The visitor center has a large viewing window from which most of 
the park features may be seen. All major features of the area are visible 
by car except the earthlodge which can be reached by a 200-yard 
(182.88-m) paved trail. The earthlodge is entered at ground level, but 
the entry door is low. The earthlodge may be seen only on conducted 
tours. Living history demonstrations and craft exhibits are offered at the 
visitor center. 



58 Hawaii 



For general information concerning the Hawaii group, visitors 
should check with the Hawaii State Office, National Park Service, 
300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Suite 6305, Box 50165, Honolulu, Hawaii 
96850. (808) 546-7584. 



City of Refuge National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 128, Honaunau, Hawaii 96726 

(808) 328-2326 

Until 1819, vanquished Hawaiian warriors, noncombatants and taboo 

breakers could escape death by reaching this sacred ground. Prehistoric 

house sites, royal fishponds, coconut groves and spectacular shore 

scenery comprise the park. A "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is on ground level and easily approached from the 
parking lot. The information sales desk and 100-foot (30.46-m) story-wall 
are on a flat, easily traveled handrailed ramp leading to an amphitheater 
with an ocean panorama. Orientation talks are given daily in the amphi- 
theater. Sitting areas are abundant in the park. Wide doors lead off the 
ramp to restrooms. One restroom is fully accessible and equipped with 
assist bars. Adjacent to the restrooms are two drinking fountains, one of 
which is 30 inches (76.20 cm) high. 

Outside of the area described, other walking surfaces may present 
difficulties because of sand, rough terrain or steps on historic walkways 
which might not be suitable for ramps. Visitors without mobility prob- 
lems may enter the palace grounds and refuge area along the shoreline 
to see the great wall and the restored temple, Hale-o-Keawe. Advance 
arrangements with the park superintendent should be made for group 
tours. 

Restaurants are available near the park. Lodgings can be found at 
Captain Cook, 15 miles (24.15 km) away. The Kona hospital, with 
ambulance service, is 10 miles ( 16.09 km) away. 

Haleakala National Park 

P.O. Box 537, Makawao, Maui, Hawaii 96768 

(808) 572-7749 

Within the large and colorful crater of 10,023-foot (2046. 99 m) Haleakala 

volcano, now dormant, grows a rare species of silversword. Other 

features are Kipahulu Valley, Seven Pools and interesting native and 

migratory birdhfe. This is a "Living Historical Farm " area. 

Visitors in wheelchairs have full access to Haleakala and Puu Ulaula 
observatories via a small ramp. Restroom doors at the visitor center and 
observatory are 30 inches (76.20 cm) wide with doors open, stall 
entry width is 22 inches (55.88 cm). At headquarters, the restroom stalls 
are 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide. All visitors may enjoy the picnic shelter 
and wayside exhibit at Hosmer Grove. Interpretive talks are offered at 
Haleakala observatory. The Oheo section can be reached by car and pro- 



Hawaii 59 



vides a fine view of the stream and waterfalls in this scenic area. All 
trails to other park features are over rough ternan. The average eleva- 
tion of the mam features of the park ranges from 6,800 feet (2,071.28 m) 
to 10,023 feet (3,053.01 m). Food and lodging are available in Kula a 
distance of 15 miles (24. 15 km). Medical services are available in Kahului, 
30 miles (48.3 km) away. 



Hawaii Volcanoes National Park 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii 967 18 

(808)967-7311 

Active volcanism, in the form of two of the world's most active volcanoes, 

Mauna Loa and Kilauea, continues here on the fsland of Hawaii. At 

lower elevations, luxuriant and often rare vegetation provides food and 

shelter for animals, some equally rare. 

Both Kilauea and Wahaula visitor centers are fully accessible. Rest- 
rooms at Kilauea visitor center are 20-feet by 8-feet (6.08 m by 2.43 m), 
entry doors are 30 inches (76.20 cm) and stall doors 32 inches (81.24 
cm) wide. Visitors should check at Kilauea visitor center for accessible 
facilities elsewhere in the park. Both centers have museums. Interpretive 
programs are presented daily at Kilauea visitor center. Most overlooks 
and exhibits on Crater Rim Road and Kalapana Cham of Craters Road 
are accessible, many features can be seen from the car. A self-guiding 
trail from Volcano House to Kilauea visitor center is easily negotiated 
by visitors in wheelchairs. Other self-guiding trails, such as Thurston 
Lava Tube and Bird Park, have steps and difficult grades. Care should 
be taken not to inhale volcanic fumes. 

Park concessioner facilities provide food and lodging, medical 
services are in Hilo, 30 miles (48.3 km) away. Road elevation ranges 
from sea level to 6,600 feet (2,010.36 m). The average elevation of mam 
features at Kilauea Caldera is below 4,000 feet ( 1,218.40). 



Puukohola Heiau National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 4963, Kawaihae, Hawaii 96743 

(808)882-7218 

Rums of Puukohola Heiau ("Temple on the Hill of the Whale"), built by 

King Kamehameha the Great (1753-1819) during his rise to power 

(1789-1819), are preserved here. 

The visitor center in this new area is a temporary wooden building with 
no special facilities, aids or programs, other than informal interpretive 
talks. The comfort stations are portable chemical toilets. 

The Puukohola Heiau rum can be viewed from a car, but the ap- 
proach to the other historical sites is by walkways over rough terrain. 

Swimming and picnic facilities and a food-supply store are in the 
adjoining county park. A gas station and general store are one mile 



60 Hawaii 



(1.61 km) away. Groups desiring to visit this park should make arrange- 
ments with the superintendent in advance. The nearest town, Waimea, 
has restaurants, lodging, a clinic and an airport. Waimea is 12 miles 
( 1 9.3 1 km) from the park. 



Idaho 61 



Craters of the Moon National Monument 

P.O. Box 29 

Arco, Idaho 832 1 3 

Fissure eruptions, volcanic cones, craters, lava flows, caves and other 

volcanic phenomena wake this an astonishing landscape. 

The visitor center is located on Highway 93 A, 18 miles (28.98 km) west 
of Arco. The center and restrooms are fully accessible, both entry doors 
and stall doors are 36 inches (91 .44 cm) wide. 

Scenic overlooks and natural features can be enjoyed by car. Trails 
to Big Craters, Tree Molds, Great Owl Cavern and North Crater are 
paved and widened but very strenuous. All trails are self-guiding. The 
amphitheater in the campgrounds, 1/4 mile (.4025 km) from the visitor 
center can be reached by paved path. Audiovisual programs and inter- 
pretive talks are presented there. 

The average elevation of mam features is 5,900 feet (1,797.14 m). 
The nearest full range of restaurants, lodging and medical services is at 
Arco. 

Nez Perce National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 93 
Spalding, Idaho 83551 
(208) 843-2685 

The history and culture of the Nez Perce fndian country are preserved, 
commemorated and interpreted here. Four federally-owned sites are 
administered by the National Park Service and 19 sites through coop- 
erative agreements. This is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is in Spalding 1 1 miles (17.71 km) south of Lewiston 
off U.S. 95. The center is a converted motel with access at ground level 
and an accessible restroom building with stall door widths 33-35 inches 
(84-89 cm), open for use from mid- April to the end of September. 

The exhibits are of Nez Perce cultural items, some of which can be 
handled. Nez Perce cultural demonstrations are given Tuesday through 
Saturday, during the summer from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. On Sunday and 
Thursday, pioneer spinning demonstrations are given during the same 
hours. Self-guiding walks around the vicinity of the visitor center are on 
level, hard-packed earth or roads. 

The 2, 100 acres (848.4 h.a.) of parkland are scattered through some 
7,500 square miles (12,075 sq. km) where the Nez Perces once roamed. 
Most of the 23 paved pullouts and overlooks are self-guiding, a few offer 
interpretation by park personnel. The nearest full range of food, lodging 
and medical services is at Lewiston. 



Yellowstone National Park 

(See Wyoming) 



62 Illinois 



Lincoln Home National Historic Site 

526 South Seventh Street 
Springfield, Illinois 62703 
(217)525-4241 

While living in this home— now the focal point of this historic area — 
Abraham Lincoln rose from the practice of a small-town lawyer to be- 
come the 16th President of the United States, 1861-65. The two-story 
structure, built in 1839, was the only home he ever owned and his 
residence for 17 years. 

Special facilities are limited at the home. Only the lower floor is accessible 
because of steep, narrow stairs to the second floor. 

A visitor center complex, built in 1976, is located on Seventh Street, 
one block west of the Lincoln Home and was designed for full acces- 
sibility. All entrances have ramps; restroom facilities and movie audi- 
toriums meet standard specifications. The visitor parking area, just south 
of the visitor center, contains two reserved spaces. Although all curbmgs 
have ramps, some difficulty may be encountered between the parking 
lot and the Lincoln Home because of rough boardwalks. 

Summer and winter are not the best times to visit because of tem- 
perature and humidity extremes. Complete hospital facilities are avail- 
able within two miles. 



Indiana 63 



George Rogers Clark National Historical Park 

40 1 South Second Street 

Vincennes, Indiana 47591 

(801)882-1776 

This classic memorial, near the site of old Fort Sackville, commemorates 

the seizure of the fort from the British by Lt. Col. George Rogers Clark, 

Feb. 25, 1779, and the resultant conquest of the Old Northwest. 

The landscaped grounds of 24 acres, including the statue of Francis 
Vigo, are, for the most part, accessible. Vigo helped to buy ammunition 
for Clark. The rotunda can be reached only by a difficult, 33-step climb. 

The visitor center, built in 1976, is accessible from the parking lot; 
restrooms are fully accessible. The center contains museum exhibits, 
an information desk and an auditorium that features a film on Clark. 

Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore 

Route 2, Box 139 A 
Chesterton, Indiana 46304 
(219)926-7561 

Along the southern shore of Lake Michigan between Gary and Michigan 
City are several sections of clean, sandy beaches backed by huge sand 
dunes, many covered with dense forests, others continually reshaped by 
wind. The parkland, totaling about 12,000 acres, preserves some of 
these remaining dunes and their associated bogs and marshes and pro- 
vides recreational opportunities along the beaches and interior lands. 

The visitor center at Highway 12 and Kemil Road, Bailly Homestead 
entrance facilities and West Beach bathhouse are accessible by ramps 
and have fully accessible restroom facilities. 

Many areas of the park may be toured by automobile. Overnight 
accommodations are readily available. A 1/2-mile (.80 km) trail originates 
at the visitor center and traverses the older wooded dunes. It is a self- 
guided environmental education trail, barrier-free and fully accessible. 

Information, brochures and audio-visual programs are offered at 
the visitor center. Interpretive activities can be arranged by appointment 
for organized groups. Full medical facilities are available. 

Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial 

Lincoln City, Indiana 47552 

(812)937-4757 

On this southern Indiana farm, Abraham Lincoln grew from youth into 

manhood, ft is a Living Historical Farm area. 

The Memorial Visitor Center is off Highway 1 62 and accessible only by 
automobile. There is no public transportation either to or within the area. 
The parking area is 50 yards (45.7 m) from the center. Between the park- 
ing area and the center are two sets of steps. A ramp is planned over 
each. The auditorium and museum are on one level. Three steps, with 



64 Indiana 



handrails, lead down into each of the two Memorial Halls. One restroom 
is accessible and equipped, but assistance is required over two entry 
steps. 

The grave of Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, is reached by 
a hard-packed gravel footpath from the visitor center. The grave is 
located on a hill, 100 yards (91.4 m) north of the parking area. The 
Lincoln Living Historical Farm is 0.3 mile (0.5 km) north of the visitor 
center. The paved parking lot is 200 yards (192.8 m) from the farm. The 
gravel trail from the parking lot to the farm leads up a moderate hill to 
the cabin. Benches are conveniently located along all trails. 

Motels and restaurants are 4 miles (6.4 km) north on Highway 231 
in Dale; doctors and hospital are 1 5 miles (24. 1 km) north on the same 
highway in Huntingburg. A campground with adequate restrooms is 
located in Lincoln State Park, adjacent to the memorial on the south. 



Iowa 65 



Effigy Mounds National Monument 

P.O. Box K 

McGregor, Iowa 52 1 57 
(319)873-2356 

The monument contains outstanding examples of prehistoric burial 
mounds in the shapes of birds and bears. 

The visitor center, 5 miles (8.05 km) north of McGregor on State High- 
way 76, is accessible to wheelchairs from the ground level, as are the 
auditorium, where audiovisual programs are presented, and the mu- 
seum. Three of the mounds can be seen from a small path and bridge 
near the visitor center. The looped Fire Point Trail to the major mound- 
viewing point at the top of the bluff is very steep and composed of packed 
gravel. The restrooms have entry doors 30 inches (76.20 cm) wide, 
stall doors are 2 1 inches (53.34 cm) wide. 



Herbert Hoover National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 607 

West Branch, Iowa 52358 

(319)643-2541 

The birthplace cottage and boyhood home of the 31st President (1929- 

33) and the gravesites of President and Mrs. Hoover are within the park. 

The Herbert Hoover Library, administered by the National Archives 

and Records Service of General Services Administration, is adjacent 

to the site. 

The re-created historic scene is fully accessible. Talks by park personnel 
and audio stations are featured. The entire area, including the gravesite 
and picnic facilities, is accessible. 

Except for the Blacksmith Shop, which is on ground level, all of the 
historic buildings — The Birthplace Cottage, the Presidential Library and 
the Quaker Meetinghouse — are entered by one or two steps. A portable 
ramp can be placed over the one step into the Meetinghouse. 

A designated space with adjacent ramp is located in the visitor 
center parking area. The visitor center has no entrance steps and the 
restrooms are fully accessible. 



66 Kansas 



Fort Larned National Historic Site 

Route 3 

Lamed, Kansas 67550 

(316)285-3571 

This fort, one of the most active military outposts in the 1860 s, was 

charged with protecting the mail and travelers on the eastern segment of 

the Santa Fe Trail, ft also was the key military base in the Indian war of 

1868-69 and later served as an Indian agency. 

There are nine original sandstone buildings around the quadrangular 
parade ground; some are open. All open buildings are accessible by 
roads or walkways. None of the old buildings have level entrances, but 
some have ramps over a step or two. The new visitor center is one of the 
original nine buildings, restored and remodeled to make it fully acces- 
sible, with fully equipped restrooms. 

The interpretive facilities include a museum, an audiovisual program 
and exhibits in the visitor center, and furnished rooms and exhibits in all 
the remaining open buildings. During the summer, daily guided tours 
and weekend "Living History" activities are scheduled. Uniformed 
rangers are available for assistance and personally conducted tours. 
The park is open year-round. 

Campgrounds, medical facilities, motels and restaurants are avail- 
able in Larned, 6 miles (9.66 km) to the east on Highway 1 56. - 



Fort Scott Historic Area 

Old Fort Scott, Old Fort Boulevard, Fort Scott, Kansas 66701 

(316)223-0310 

Fort Scott commemorates the historic events in Kansas prior to and 

during the Civil War. Located in the city of Fort Scott, it is 90 miles south 

of Kansas City. This is an Affiliated Area. 

Several buildings of this 1842 Army post have been restored and restora- 
tion continues on others. One of the fully restored buildings is the visitor 
center. The city parking lot is directly in front of the site. Restrooms in 
the visitor center have been designed to accommodate wheelchairs and 
are of ample size and fully equipped, and with wide doors, opening 
outward. 

The second floor where the audiovisual programs are presented is 
reached by narrow, steep stairs. Exhibits are in all of the restored build- 
ings on ground level floors. Visitors can tour the grounds on stone 
walkways with self-guiding folders. 

The site is staffed by volunteers from a local historical society. 

The alternative phone number for information about the site is 
(316)223-0550. 



Kentucky 67 



Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site 

R.F.D. 1 

Hodgenville, Kentucky 42748 

(502) 358-3874 

An early 19th-century Kentucky cabin, symbolic of the one in which 

Lincoln was born, is preserved in a memorial building at the site of his 

birth. 

The site is 3 miles (4.83 km) south of Hodgenville on U.S. 3 IE, 60 miles 
(96.6 km) south of Louisville. The visitor center is accessible at ground 
level from the nearby parking area. The picnic area is across U.S. 31E 
from the visitor center. Restrooms in the visitor center have entry doors 
23 inches (58.42 cm) wide and stall doors 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide. 
Restrooms in the picnic area have entry doors 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide 
and stall doors 32 inches (8 1 .28 cm) wide. 

The memorial building is on a slope, 56 steps lead to the front 
entrance. Visitors in wheelchairs may drive on a service road to the rear 
of the building and enter at ground level. The Boundary Oak is reached 
by a rough flagstone walkway. The rule, "Do not touch the cabin," does 
not apply to visually handicapped visitors. An 18-minute movie, museum 
exhibits and interpretive talks are offered in the visitor center. 



Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area 

(See Tennessee) 



Cumberland Gap National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 840 

Middlesboro, Kentucky 40965 

77ms mountain pass on the Wilderness Road, explored by Daniel Boone, 

developed into a mam artery of the great trans-Allegheny migration for 

settlement of "the Old West" and as an important military objective in the 

Revolutionary and Civil Wars. The park lies m Kentucky, Virginia and 

Tennessee, ft has a "Living Historical Farm " area. 

The visitor center, 1/2 mile (.805 km) south of Middlesboro, is accessible 
at ground level from the rear parking area. Restrooms are on the first 
floor of the visitor center. Entry doors are 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide and 
stall doors are 26 inches (66.04 cm) wide. 

The musuem and audiovisual room on the second floor are reached 
by a flight of steps with handrails. Many park features are accessible: 
Sugar Run overlook, the Iron Furnace, Cumberland Gap, Pinnacle 
shelter and the Wilderness Road with campground and picnic areas. 
The Sugar Run picnic area is 3 miles (4.83 km) from the visitor center and 
is fully accessible and has comfort stations with entry and stall doors the 
same dimensions as those in the visitor center. 



68 Kentucky 



A 0.3 mile (.483 km) nature trail at Sugar Run is self-guiding by 
cassette tape or printed material. The trail is level and paved. Living 
history demonstrations are given by park interpreters in period dress. 



Mammoth Cave National Park 

Mammoth Cave, Kentucky 42259 
(502)758-2251 

Mammoth Cave is a series of underground passages that has beautiful 
limestone, gypsum and cave onyx formations, deep pits and high domes 
and an underground river. Explored and mapped for 146 miles, it is 
the longest recorded cave system in the world. 

The visitor center, 9 miles (14.49 km) northwest of Park City off 1-65, by 
State Routes 255 or 70, is accessible via curb ramp from the parking 
area. Spaces have been designated for visitors in wheelchairs. The rest- 
rooms in the center have been modified to accommodate wheelchairs. 

Dining rooms, gift shops, lounges and a few guest rooms are on the 
first floor of the Mammoth Cave Hotel and also of the Sunset Point Lodge. 
Entry to the lodges is difficult but construction of a ramp over the three 
entry steps in each case is underway. Reservations for the few first-floor 
lodgings in either of the lodges should be made with National Park 
Concessions, Inc., Mammoth Cave, Kentucky 42259. Telephone (502) 
758-2225. 

An audiovisual orientation program is shown regularly in the audi- 
torium. A special cave tour is scheduled daily for visitors in wheelchairs 
and their companions. This tour is by elevator to the Snowball section 
(dry passageways, gypsum crystalline formations). A written account of 
the cave tour is available. The 1/2-day cave tours and most of the surface 
trails in the park are very strenuous because of numerous ascents and 
descents and difficult terrain. 

Park roads lead to pleasant vistas, all accessible. Visitors may drive 
to the Green River at two free-ferry crossings. Campfire and evening 
programs are offered on a limited basis in the spring and autumn and 
regularly during the summer. The 1/4-mile (.40 km) Sunset Point Nature 
Trail which leads to a view of the Green River Valley is on level ground 
but is bumpy. 



Louisiana 69 



Chalmette National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 429 
Arabi, Louisiana 70032 
(504) 27 1 -24 1 2 (headquarters) 
(504)271-2413 

Scene of the major part of the Battle of New Orleans m the War of 1812 
where the United States won a brilliant victory, this park includes Chal- 
mette National Cemetery, ft is a "Living History" area. 

The park is on Louisiana Highway 46, the St. Bernard Highway. Trails 
leading to the memorial monument, the restored mud rampart and the 
Beauregard Plantation House visitor center are all accessible. Audio- 
visual programs are located on the first floor of the visitor center. The 
museum exhibits on the second floor are accessible only by steep and 
winding stairs. Restrooms can accommodate wheelchairs and stalls are 
equipped with handrails. 

A self-guiding, one-mile (1.61 km), one-way tour for automobiles 
has six stops and wayside exhibits, most of which are on one level. 
Chalmette National Cemetery, located on the battlefield, may be reached 
by car. 



70 Maine 



Acadia National Park 

Route 1, Box 1, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609 

(207) 288-3338 

Rocky coastal area on Mt Desert Island, Maine. Highest point on the 

eastern seaboard; picturesque Schoodic Peninsula on the mainland; half 

of Isle auHaut with spectacular cliffs. 

The trail at the Cadillac Mountain parking area offers a view of the 
Atlantic Ocean and islands. A service road from the visitor center park- 
ing area is connected to the center by a 125-foot (38.10 m) ramp, with 
guard rail. Doors are not automated. Water fountains can be reached 
by wheelchair visitors and small children. Audiovisual programs are 
held in the auditorium. Summer evening interpretive programs are given 
nightly at the campgrounds. Asphalt sidewalks lead to the campground 
amphitheatre. Cassette tape tours of the park are available at the visitor 
center. Ramps lead from parking areas to Jordan Pond Shore and the 
beach proper at Echo Lake Beach Mountain. Most developed areas are 
well-paved and level. 

Summer is the busiest season. All ages will enjoy the sites in the 
park. While there are no Braille signs, visually handicapped visitors will 
delight in the different geological and natural wonders of the park if 
accompanied by another visitor. For visitors who may have hearing 
problems, exhibits and some amphitheatre shows are ideally suited. Park 
personnel are available at all times for assistance in first aid, information 
and other services. 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

P.O. Box 236 

Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 25425 

(304)535-6371 

Approximately 2,000 miles (3220 km) of this scenic trail follow the 

Appalachian Mountains from Mount Katahdm, Maine, to Springer 

Mountain, Ga. The trail is one of the two initial units of the National Trail 

System, established in 1968. 

Following the crests of long ridges, skirting mountain streams and 
sparkling lakes, climbing rocky alpine slopes or dropping to cross the 
largest rivers and boasting hundreds of spectacular scenic vistas, the 
Appalachian National Scenic Trail presents an exciting panorama of 
eastern America. The vegetation and wildlife of the Trail are as varied 
as its topography. 

The Trail is varied, too, m its proximity to civilization. Most of it 
traverses rugged terrain, but some stretches, although rough underfoot, 
are within sight and sound of highways and built-up areas. The Appa- 
lachian Trail runs through the states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and 
Georgia. 



Maine 7 1 



The Appalachian Trail Conference, formed in 1925, embraces local 
clubs directly responsible for specified sections of the Trail, other clubs 
that contribute support and thousands of dues-paying members. 

Detailed information on the nature of the Trail and guidelines for 
using it can be obtained from the Appalachian Trail Conference, 
Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 25425, (304) 535-6331. 



Roosevelt Campobello International Park N.B., Canada 
c/o Executive Secretary 

Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission 
P.O. Box 97 
Lubec, Maine 04652 

(506) 752-2922 (New Brunswick, Canada) 

Franklin D. Roosevelt was stricken by poliomyelitis here at his summer 
home at the age of 39. This is the first international park to be adminis- 
tered by a joint commission, ft is an Affiliated Area. 

The park was established July 7, 1964. It is owned and administered by 
the United States-Canadian Commission. The park is in New Brunswick, 
Canada. 



Saint Croix Island National Monument 

c/o Acadia National Park 

Bar Harbor, Maine 04609 

(207) 288-3338 

An island where the French tried to settle in 1604 before settling in 

New France (Canada). 

No federal facilities. 



72 Maryland 



Anacostia Park 

c/o National Capital Parks-East 

52 10 Indian Head Highway 

Oxon Hill, Maryland 2002 1 

Site telephone: (202) 472-3873 

This municipal 1200-acre park overlooking the Anacostia River has 

lighted basketball courts, ball fields, a roller skate pavilion, a swimming 

pool, tennis courts and picnic areas. The park stretches along the east 

bank of the Anacostia River from Boiling Air Force Base, north to the 

railroad tracks. Access is from four approaches: South Capital Street, 

the 11th Street bridges, Good Hope Road and Fennsylvama Avenue, 

following signs on each. 

The visitor center is covered, multi-use Anacostia Pavilion, at the northern 
end of the park, near the Pennsylvania Avenue entrance. Summer ac- 
tivities in the Pavilion include arts and crafts, evening concerts, movies, 
roller skating and wheelchair basketball games. Picnicking, tennis, and 
swimming are among the outdoor activities. There are no paved side- 
walks or reserved parking. The Pavilion is accessible at ground level 
except for the skating rink, where access is by ramp. Fully accessible 
restrooms are in the Pavilion. 



Antietam National Battlefield Site 

P.O.Box 158 

Sharpsburg, Maryland 21782 

(301)432-5124 

Gen. Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North ended on this battlefield. 

in 1862. This is a "Living History" area. 

The site is 1 mile (1.61 km) north of Sharpsburg on Md. 65. Ramps cross 
the parking lot curb and provide access to the observation deck at the 
rear of the visitor center. The ramps are rough surfaced to prevent 
slipping in wet weather, and the observation deck is carpeted with 
easily negotiated floor covering. Construction of fully accessible and 
equipped restrooms is underway. The exhibit and display room is on a 
floor below the observation deck and is reached by eight steps. 

A taped tour is available at the visitor center for the 8-mile ( 1 2.88 km) 
self-guiding car trip around the park. Living interpretive programs are 
given at Dunker Church (accessible by ramp), Piper Farm and the Na- 
tional Cemetery. Concerts, a Shakespeare Summer Festival, and a 
commemorative Dunker Church Service are other summer features. An 
audiovisual orientation slide program is given in the observation room. 
The park provides wayside visual aids and an audiovisual station with 
maps and photos on the park road. 



Maryland 73 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Assateague Island National Seashore Md.-Va. 
R.D. 2, Box 294 

Route 611,7 miles southeast of Berlin 
Berlin, Maryland 21811 
(301)641-1441 

This 37 -mile (59.54 km) barrier island in Maryland and Virginia is com- 
prised of sandy beaches, dunes, pine woodlands and marshes. It is 
noted lor its recreational opportunities, migratory waterfowl and wild 
ponies. 

Maryland section The national seashore visitor center, a one- 
story structure with restrooms, located on the mainland, is entirely 
accessible. A park naturalist interprets the beachcombing exhibit 
to visitors from July 1 to Labor Day, and by prior arrangement 
during the remainder of the year. All boardwalks from parking 
areas to the beach can be traversed by wheelchair, assistance is 
available as needed. 

Assateague State Park, at the north end of the area, has a ramp to 
both the concession building and bathhouse in the day-use area. 
Help may be required up the 6-mch ( 1 5 24 cm) step to this ramp. No 
admission fee is charged at the state park day-use area if the visitor 
can provide certification of permanent disability. 

The state park campground is recommended as all sites fea- 
ture asphalt parking pad with paved access to modern wash facili- 
ties. Reservations are made with the Superintendent, Assateague 
State Park, R.D. 2, Box 293, Berlin, Maryland 2181 1. 

The national seashore campgrounds are more primitive and 
have outside portable toilets. The day-use area, however, features 
indoor facilities. Bayside crabbing can be enjoyed at the old North 
Beach Ferry Landing. 

Virginia section on Route 13, about 13 miles (20.93 km) east of 
Virginia Highway 175. (804) 336-6577. 

Four steps make entry into the national seashore information 
station difficult, but the day-use bathhouse and indoor restroom 
facilities are readily accessible. Visitors may need assistance to 
cross one of the clay beach access points from the road south of 
the day-use area, as well as up the ramp to Toms Cove Historical 
overlook. Family campgrounds and restaurants convenient to the 
Virginia section are provided outside the seashore in the com- 
munity of Chincoteague, Virginia. 



74 Maryland 



Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge visitor center is acces- 
sible, but there are only portable toilets. The paved 1-mile (1.61 km) 
Pony Trail can accommodate wheelchairs. The 3-mile (4.83 km) 
Wildlife Drive, also paved, is closed to automobiles until 3 p.m. each 
day. Visitors should contact the refuge headquarters for alternate 
directions to the lighthouse. The address of the Refuge Manager is 
P.O. Box 62, Chincoteague, Virginia 23336. (804) 336-6122. 



Catoctin Mountain Park 

Thurmont, Maryland 21788 

(30 1 ) 824-2574, or 27 1 -7447 

Embracing part of the forested ridge that forms the eastern rampart of 

the Appalachian Mountains in Maryland, Catoctin Mountain Park has 

sparkling streams and panoramic vistas of the Monocacy Valley. The 

park is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center, 2 miles (3.22 km) west of Thurmont, is fully accessible 
by ramps over one curb from the parking lot and one step at the entry. 
The audiovisual programs, exhibits and interpretive and other pro- 
grams are all on the mam floor and the restrooms are accessible with 
stall door widths of 32 inches (8 1 .28 cm). 

An interpretive guidebook is provided for self-guided auto tours over 

Manahan Road which runs 7 miles (1 1.27 km) through the park. Some 
trout fishing areas are accessible to visitors in wheelchairs. Information 
on these and accessible trails is available at the visitor center. Trail 
climbs to Chimney and Wolf Rock overlooks, varying from 800 to 1,400 
feet (243.68 to 426.44 m), are very strenuous and over rugged terrain. 

Camp Round Meadow is accessible to all visitors, and the area 
provides exhibits and craft shops. Restrooms are accessible. Two camps, 
Misty Mountain and Greentop, are available in summer only for group 
camping. The oldest of these is Misty Mountain with sleeping lodges, 
recreation buildings, dining halls, kitchens and swimming pools. Most 
of these facilities are accessible. The camp is used regularly in summer 
by groups of handicapped persons. Arrangements must be made in 
advance through the Baltimore League for Crippled Children and 
Adults, 1 1 1 1 East Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, Md. 21212. 

All facilities at Camp Greentop are fully accessible. 

A paved nature trail with parking adjacent is near Greentop and the 
Chestnut picnic area. Bird walks and interpretive talks are offered at a 
campground near the visitor center. Interpretive talks, campfire pro- 
grams and short, conducted trips are available at Camp Greentop. 
Special activities are scheduled during summer encampment of organ- 
ized groups of handicapped visitors at Camp Greentop. 



Maryland 75 



Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park D.C.-Md.-Va. 

P.O. Box 4 

Sharpsburg, Maryland 21782 

(30 1 ) 432-223 1 or by tie-line from Washington, D.C. 948-564 1 

The 184-mile C&O Canal follows a route along the Potomac River, from 

Georgetown in the District of Columbia, to Cumberland, Md., including 

Great Falls, Md. Built between 1828 and 1850, the Canal and its park 

land are in Maryland, the District of Columbia and West Virginia. This 

is a "Living History " area. 

Park headquarters is 4 miles (6.44 km) west of Sharpsburg, Md., on 
Md. 34. Other visitor centers and information offices are: at Hancock, 
Md., 108 West Mam Street, (301) 678-5463 (access at ground level, in- 
adequate restrooms); North Branch (intermittent) visitor center, 8 miles 
(12.88 km) south of Cumberland, off Md. 51, (301) 777-8667, (rest- 
rooms inadequate); Great Falls Tavern, Md. (301) 299-3613 (with acces- 
sible single-use restrooms, curb ramp from parking lot), and George- 
town, D.C. (intermittent) visitor center in Foundry Mall on the canal be- 
tween 30th and Thomas Jefferson Street, (202) 337-6652, (access 
impeded by many steps up or down depending upon entrance used). 

Most approaches to the canal are accessible and most footbridges 
across the canal are wide enough for wheelchairs. Once on the towpath, 
visitors in wheelchairs will be able to travel in most sections in good 
weather. The towpath is level between locks, then rises 8 feet (2.44 m) 
to the next level at each lock. At several places accessible by car, the 
footing is fairly firm and level. 

Three drive-in camps for tent and trailer camping are available for 
visitors with mobility difficulties. They are at McCoys Ferry, near Clear 
Spring, Md., Spring Gap, near Cumberland, Md. and Fifteen Mile 
Creek at Little Orleans. The fishing platform above Lock 70 at Oldtown, 
Md. was built to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. 

Great Falls Tavern, built in 1830 as a rest stop for visitors using the 
canal, is now a museum and has a small audiovisual program. Special 
tours for handicapped visitors are offered at the park headquarters. It 
is advisable to secure information as to locations and make advance 
arrangements for the tours. 

Interstate 70 is the major highway access to the various sections of 
the park. 

Accessible restaurants and lodgings will be found in major urban 
areas, near 1-70. 



Clara Barton National Historic Site 

5801 Oxford Road 

Glen Echo, Maryland 20768 

(301)492-6246 

Built m 1892, this 38-room home of the founder of the American Bed 

Cross was for seven years headquarters of that organization. 



76 Maryland 



The house is entered by flights of steps at the front and rear, and a flight 
of steps down to the basement on the side. The second and third floors 
are reached by open flights of steps. Plans are being formulated to pro- 
vide access for visitors in wheelchairs at least to the first floor. Fully 
accessible public restrooms are at nearby Glen Echo Park. 

Access to the site from the rough graveled parking lot, which also 
serves Glen Echo Park, is by steep paths. Parking for handicapped 
visitors is available in the driveway of the home. 

Modifications and refurnishmgs of the historic house are in progress. 
Some period pieces are in place and others are being sought. 

The house is open 1-5 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday. 



Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine 

Mailing address: Baltimore, Maryland 21230 

Location: East end of Fort Avenue, South Baltimore 

(301)962-4290 

The successful defense of this fort in the War of 1812 on September 

13-14, 1814, inspired Francis Scott Key to write "The Star Spangled 

Banner. " ft is a "Living History " area. 

Except for the battlements, the area is fully accessible. The visitor center 
has a ramp at the entrance and another into the auditorium where an 
introductory 15-minute film is given. Ramps are provided to all buildings 
where first floor exhibits are displayed. Restroom doors in the visitor 
center are 30 inches (76.20 cm) wide, and stall doors, 26 inches (66.04 
cm) wide. 

The 1-mile (1.61 km) foot trail around Fort McHenry is easily nego- 
tiable with some assistance. The audio stations on the battlements, how- 
ever, are inaccessible by wheelchair because of two sets of stairs, one 
with six steps, 9 inches (22.86 cm) high, and the other with seven 
steps, 8 inches (23.32 cm high. 



Fort Washington Park 

Fort Washington Road, off Indian Head Highway 
Oxon Hill, Maryland 2002 1 
(301)292-2112 

This massive early- 19th century fort, on the Maryland side of the Poto- 
mac across from Mount Vernon, was built to protect the Capital City. 
The fort was begun in 1814 to replace an 1809 fort destroyed by the 
British. This is a "Living History" area. 

To reach the fort, use Exit 37 south from the Capital Beltway (1-495) onto 
Md. 2 10 (Indian Head Highway) to Fort Washington Road. 

The fort is two miles (3.22 km) inside the park from Fort Washington 
Road. A steep, paved walkway and ramp lead to the entry gate, but the 
cobblestone threshold makes entry difficult. All other walkways are of 



Maryland 77 



hard-packed gravel but the uneven grading of the parade ground may 
present difficulties. Guided tours by interpreters in period dress and 
push-button audiovisual stations are offered at the fort. Living history 
demonstrations are given year round. 

Many pleasant vistas can be viewed by car. Picnic areas are accessible 
throughout the park on level ground and grass. Portable accessible 
restrooms are available near the maintenance facility to the left as visitors 
enter the park. 



George Washington Memorial Parkway 

(See Virginia) 



Glen Echo Park 

MacArthur Boulevard and Oxford Road 
Glen Echo, Maryland 20768 
(301)492-6282 

Glen Echo Park was once a 19th-century Chautauqua stop on Mary- 
land's Potomac Palisades and then an amusement park. It is now a 
popular arts and cultural center Information on its facilities and activities 
may be obtained at Glen Echo Gallery and from park personnel. 

The Gallery has two steep steps at the entry, but staff members are 
available for assistance. Grading throughout the park is hilly, and care 
should be taken on bumpy terrain. Ramps give entry to fully accessible 
restrooms next to the Carousel and also in the Adventure Theater across 
from the Experimental Children's Workshop, and in the Campus Room. 

Special permits are available to park in the staff lot at the top of the 
hill for individuals attending various classes. Entrances to the following 
buildings have a number of steps or are otherwise difficult for persons 
with mobility difficulties: the pool area, the sculpture building, the 
woodshop, the ballroom (with 6 interior steps), the writer's workshop 
and the gallery, (which also has a three-story circular staircase). 

The National Park Service offers a variety of arts and crafts courses 
and programs, including educational experiences for handicapped 
children, and the puppet theater. A regular feature, from 1977 on, 
throughout the summer until Labor Day, is a family Sunday outing called 
"Chautauqua Summer" which offers dancing, music and artists at work. 

The major interpretive activity at Glen Echo is the Children's Experi- 
mental Workshop, a year-round program involving special populations, 
in a series of intensive workshops collaboratively designed by profes- 
sional staff in the performing and applied arts. During the nine-month 
school year, children with multiple handicaps and learning disabilities 
are drawn from all over Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia to 
participate in the program. A variety of techniques in theatre arts 
(puppetry), music, sculptural pottery and multi-media design are ex- 
plored to encourage intuitive skills in improvisation, movement/rhythm 



78 Maryland 



and approaches to space, form, color and texture. The 9-month series is 
made possible partially by a grant from the National Endowment for the 
Arts. 

The Multicultural Day Camp, during the summer months includes 
children from a wide variety of ethnic backgrounds. The program was 
created in 1972 and grew out of a need expressed by a teacher working 
in a District school for the blind. 



Greenbelt Park 

650 1 Greenbelt Road 

Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 

(301)344-3948 

Just 12 miles (19.32 km) from Washington, B.C., this woodland park 

offers many forms of outdoor recreation. 

The visitor center is on Park Central Road in Greenbelt, near the inter- 
section of the Capital Beltway (1-495) and Greenbelt Road. The visitor 
center entrance is difficult because of steps, and the restrooms are in- 
adequate for visitors in wheelchairs. 

The Sweetgum picnic area, 2Vz miles (4.025 km) from the visitor 
center on Park Central Road, is fully accessible, with equipped rest- 
rooms designed to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. A campground, 
Vz mile (0.805 km) beyond Sweetgum, with on-site parking, also has 
fully accessible and equipped restrooms with entry at ground level. 

Campfire programs are given in the campground amphitheater. 
Saturdays and Sundays. Conducted nature walks and talks are offered 
on the Dogwood nature trail starting in a parking area on the park road 
near the Sweetgum picnic area. 



Hampton National Historic Site 

535 Hampton Lane 

Towson, Maryland 2 1 204 

(301)823-7054 

This is a fine example of one of the lavish Georgian mansions of America 

built during the latter part of the 18th century. 

The outside entrance to the mam house has nine steps. The terrace and 
tea room in the east wing of the mansion are directly accessible from the 
informal parking lot on that side of the house. From the east wing, four 
steps lead to a wide landing, 7 inches (17.78 cm) high. Beyond the land- 
ing are another three steps of the same height that provide access to the 
first floor of the mansion. Restroom facilities are only in the basement, 
reached by a steep flight of stairs. Assistance may be needed on the 
steep, inclined path to the restored gardens. 



Maryland 79 



Harpers Ferry National Historical Park 

(See West Virginia) 



Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens 

c/o National Capital Parks-East 
52 10 Indian Head Highway 
Oxon Hill, Maryland 2002 1 
(202) 426-6905 

The gardens and numerous ponds are used to produce aquatic plants, 
principally tropical, and hardy varieties of water lilies, also lotus, other 
water plants and flora. 

The gardens are located on Anacostia Drive, off U.S. 295 North at 
Eastern Avenue exit. Follow signs all the way. 

The three buildings are greenhouses with low sills, the interior sur- 
faces are dirt. A parking lot is adjacent to the largest greenhouse, the 
main office building. Restrooms are in this building. Entrance doors are 
28 inches (71.12 cm) wide and stall doors 30 inches (76.20 cm). 

Gravel paths leading through the gardens are hard packed and level. 



Monocacy National Battlefield 

c/o C&O Canal National Historical Park 

Box 4 

Sharpsburg, Maryland 2 1782 

(301)432-5124 

In a battle here July 9, 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal T. Early defeated 
Union forces commanded by Brig. Gen. Lew Wallace. Wallace's troops 
delayed Early, however, enabling Union forces to marshal a successful 
defense of Washington, D. C. 

There are no Federal facilities at this area. Acquisition of land begins in 
fiscal year 1978. 



National Capital Parks 

(See District of Columbia) 



80 Maryland 



Oxon Hill Farm 

Off the Capital Beltway at Indian Head Highway 
Oxon Hill, Maryland 2002 1 
(301)839-1177 

Oxon Hill Farm is a turn-of-the-century working farm, especially attrac- 
tive for children. This is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is an old barn with access at ground level from a 
barrier-free parking area. The comfort station is a portable accessible 
restroom. The roads and paths around the farm are all of packed gravel 
and gently graded. 

Demonstrations are given during the different farming seasons. In- 
formal interpretation and guided tours are available throughout the 
year. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visitors may touch the animals 
and farm implements. Small picnic grounds are accessible. 



Massachusetts 81 



Adams National Historic Site 

135 Adams Street 

Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

(617)773-1177 

Home of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams; of Charles 

Francis Adams, U.S. Minister to Great Britain during the Civil War; 

and of Henry and Brooks Adams, writers and historians. 

The first floor of the Old House, the library, which is a separate building, 
and the adjacent 18th-century garden may be enjoyed by all. It is easy 
to move with walking aids through these areas. Visitors will have to 
navigate two steps into the house. Personnel are available to aid persons 
in wheelchairs. The garden does not have railings, but benches are 
located on the grounds. 

The second floor of the house and subsequent areas of the tour are 
not designed for those handicapped in movement. A stairway and railing 
lead to the upper floors. 

Advance arrangements for special tours can be made. Skilled per- 
sonnel can design the tour to fit the size, age and type of group. The park 
is not open during the winter months. Bus tours bring visitors to the 
front walk of the house. 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Boston National Historical Park 

Charlestown Navy Yard 
Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 

Bunker Hill Monument 

Monument Square, Charlestown 02129, (617) 242-9562 
The first major battle of the Revolution was fought here. The monu- 
ment is the first obelisk built in the United States. 

Ramps lead to the monument, lodge and restrooms. To reach the 
top visitors climb 294 8-inch (20.32 cm) steps. Handrails, along the 
path, lead to the monument. Some benches are provided for 
visitors. Privately driven vehicles can be parked at the Charlestown 
Navy Yard, a seven-minute walk from the site. Audio-tours of the 
grounds and the monument are available at the lodge. 

USS Constitution 

Boston Naval Shipyard, Charlestown 02129, (617) 242-3734 
Oldest United States ship afloat, was originally built in 1797. Re- 
cently restored, it is the flagship of the First Naval District. An 
Affiliated Area. 



82 Massachusetts 



A new ramp with handrails, designed to accommodate wheel- 
chairs, has been installed in the restroom facilities in Building 5. 
Only the Spar deck on the ship is accessible. Visitors will find the 
tour interesting as they touch the objects being discussed (guns, 
ropes, etc.). Parking is free and private vehicles can be driven close 
to the ship. Special tours can be arranged for all types and ages 
of groups. 

A privately operated museum is in the Navy Yard approximately 
200 yards (175 m) from the ship. Elevators provide access to 
second-floor restrooms in the museum. 

Faneuil Hall 

Merchants Row, Boston 02129, (617) 223-6098 
Faneuil Hall is sometimes called the cradle of liberty. It was used for 
Boston Town Meetings. The original structure was completed m 
1742 and was enlarged to its present size in 1806. The fourth floor 
houses the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. 

There are over two dozen steep 8-inch (20.32 cm) steps into the 
Hall. Plenty of seats are available at the top of the steps. Formal talks 
are scheduled during the summer. Park personnel are available for 
aid and information services. 

Old North Church 

193 Salem Street, Boston 021 13; (617) 523-6676 
The Church and its famous steeple, located in the North End of 
Boston, were originally built in 1723. This is where the lanterns were 
hung on the eve of the Revolution signaling that the British were 
approaching Boston by sea. 

Old North Church is accessible to most visitors. There is one very 
low step into the building and wide aisles in the building. Approach 
to the church is through the narrow streets of the area. Most buses 
do not drive on these roads. It is easiest to walk to the site from the 
Paul Revere House — a five-minute walk. All sidewalks in the North 
End have curb-cuts. Once inside the church, visitors can join tours. 
Special arrangements can be made ahead of time by calling 
the church. 

Old South Meeting House 

Washington Street, Boston 021 14; (617) 482-6439 
The Meeting House is part of the Boston Freedom Trail in the down- 
town shopping district of Boston. It is the original 18th-century 
building. 

Access into the building is easy. Sidewalk curb-cuts are at Milk 
Street. There is one 6-inch (15.24 cm) step into the building. Rest- 
rooms are inaccessible. Visitors may be seated during the talks. 



Massachusetts 83 



Old State House 

206 Washington Street, Boston 021 14; (617) 523-7033 
This building is the scene of the Boston Massacre and the spot 
where the Declaration of Independence was first read m Boston. 
There is an exhibit on the history of Boston on the first floor 



Access into the building is difficult as nine 7-1/2-inch (19.05 cm) 
steps are at the entrance. There are no programs or guided tours. 

Paul Revere House 

19 North Square, Boston 021 13, (617) 227-0972 

This house is also part of the Freedom Trail and the home of Paul 

Revere. 

Access to the house is over an 8-mch (20.32 cm) step at the front 
door and also at the side door. Visitors will enjoy the "touch-and- 
feel" tour of the house. 



Cape Cod National Seashore 

South Wellfleet, Massachusetts 02663 

(617)349-3785 

Ocean beaches, dunes, woodlands, freshwater ponds and marshes on 

outer Cape Code, for four centuries a landmark and haven for mariners. 

Both Salt Pond and Province Lands Visitor Centers (except for the ob- 
servation deck at Province Lands) and their adjacent amphitheatres are 
all accessible. In summer, programs are given nightly at both amphi- 
theatres. Other popular facilities which are accessible are the Marconi 
Station in South Wellfleet, the temporary Life-Saving Museum at the 
Coast Guard Station at Eastham, the Pilgrim Spring and the Fort Hill 
trail shelters, all picnic areas and all beaches except Head of the Meadow. 

In addition, Buttonbush Trail features trail markers in Braille and has 
extra large lettering for the partially sighted. The entire length of the trail 
is defined by bright yellow rope. The trail is 1/4 of a mile (402.34 m) long, 
with tan bark chips and a slight incline. It is easily walked. 

Interpretive talks at the amphitheatres are illustrated. Self-guided and 
guided tours with park personnel are not easily adaptive for visitors in 
wheelchairs. Park personnel are located throughout the park for any 
assistance visitors may need. 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site 

83 Beals Street 

Brookline, Massachusetts 02146 

(617)566-7937 

Birthplace and early boyhood home (1917-20) of the 35th President of 

the United States (1961-63), a nine-room, two-story structure. 



84 Massachusetts 



The entrance presents difficulties. There are six 7-mch (18 cm) steps 
with guard rail to the porch. On request, park personnel will assist, but 
maneuvering may be difficult as the steps are steep. Six audio stations 
provide descriptions recorded by Mrs. Rose Kennedy, mother of the 
President. Tours for special groups are available. 

Longfellow National Historic Site 

1 05 Brattle Street 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 02 1 38 

(617)876-4491 

The home of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow includes the house s 

furnishings and a large garden. This site was used by General George 

Washington during the siege of Boston. 

Persons in wheelchairs may enter through the driveway entrance. 
Personnel are available to aid visitors over two 5-mch (12.7 cm) steps 
into the house. Benches are located along the walks. Doors inside the 
house are wide. Runners and rugs are on the floors. Guided tours are 
offered. Visitors are advised to call the site before arrival. A special 
3-hour program for children, "Children's Hour," by reservation only, is 
the single program for which the second floor of the home is used. 

Minute Man National Historical Park 

Box 160 

Concord, Massachusetts 01742 

(617)484-6156 

Scene of the fighting on opening day of the Revolutionary War, April 19, 

1775. Includes the Old North Bridge, the Minute Man Statue, 4 miles of 

Battle Road between Lexington and Concord, and "The Wayside, " 

Nathaniel Ha wthrone 's Home, ft is a "Living History" area. 

The Old North Bridge and the Minute Man Statue are readily accessible. 
There are no steps in this area. The path is not paved but consists of 
hard-packed earth. The reconstructed bridge arches over the Concord 
River. Interpretive talks are given at the Old North Bridge. A schedule of 
these talks is available at the Buttnck Mansion on the hill overlooking the 
Bridge. From the Minute Man Statue, visitors can walk through the land- 
scaped gardens and up to the mansion where additional exhibits are on 
display. Upon request, staff will place a portable ramp over entrance 
steps. 

Prior reservations can be made for "In Touch With The Past," a 
touch-and-feel tour at Buttnck Mansion of the 18th-century reproductions 
such as a spinning wheel, furniture, pieces, and tools. 

Battle Road Visitor Center is located on Route 2A in Lexington. 
Along the Battle Road, the local Minute Men chased the British 
troops back to Boston. Movies, audio-visual exhibits, and programs 
depicting events leading up to April 19, 1775 are offered. 



Massachusetts 85 



No barriers block access into the Visitor Center. Restrooms 
are designed to accommodate wheelchairs. Information is printed 
in extra-large type. 

Fiske Hill Information Station, Routes 2 A and 128, Lexington, 
offers information about the surrounding area and picnic facilities. 
There are no barriers here. 



Salem Maritime National Historic Site 

Derby Street 

Salem, Massachusetts 01790 
(617)744-4323 

This seaport town is the only major port never occupied by the British 
during the Revolution. Later the wharf became one of the nation's great 
mercantile centers. Other structures of maritime, architectural and 
literary significance include the Derby House, Custom House, Bonded 
Warehouse and the Ha wkes House. It is a "Living History" area. 

Derby Wharf, the historic roadway to the wharf, the park grounds and 
the restrooms are all accessible. A wooden ramp covers the parking 
curb. Cars are prohibited on the historic roadway. If advance notice is 
given, visitors needing aid will be assisted up the 12 steep steps to the 
Custom House. The first floor of the Custom House contains the Haw- 
thorne room, a maritime museum and a slide program. The doors into 
Derby House are too small to accommodate wheelchairs. 

The Bonded Warehouse behind the Custom House is open, acces- 
sible and a major attraction. 



Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site 

144 Central Street 

Saugus, Massachusetts 01906 

(617)233-0050 

Reconstruction of the first integral ironworks in North America, begun 

m 1646; includes furnace, forge and rolling and slitting mill; original 

iron master's house; museum. It is a "Living History" area. 

All buildings and facilities are accessible, but if visitors cannot negotiate 
the flight of steps to the Iron Works, directions should be obtained for 
reaching the works from Bridge Street, an alternative route. Ramps pro- 
vide easy access into the museum, the ground floor of the iron master's 
house and the restrooms. Interpretive programs are offered. Park em- 
ployees will assist visitors. 



86 Massachusetts 



Springfield Armory National Historic Site 

National Park Service 
P.O. Box 515 
Federal and State Streets 
Springfield Massachusetts 01 103 
Museum telephone: (413) 734-6477 

Over a span of 200 years this small-arms manufacturing center produced 
such weapons as the 1795 flintlock and the 1783, 1903, M-l, and M-14 
rifles. The largest collection of Confederate and other small arms is main- 
tained here. 

Visitors may take self -guiding tours of the museum but advance arrange- 
ments may be made for special guided tours by calling the site head- 
quarters. Museum and restrooms are fully accessible. 



Michigan 87 



Isle Royale National Paik 

87 North Ripley Street 

Houghton, Michigan 49931 

(906)482-3310 

The largest island in Lake Superior, Isle Royale is also distinguished for 

its wilderness forest, pre-Columbian copper mines and its timber wolves 

and moose herd living m near perfect symbiotic balance. 

The only access to the island is by boat or airplane and both of these 
services are dependent upon weather conditions. No automobiles are 
allowed on the island and there are no roads. The boat trip requires 
special assistance for those with mobility impairment because of the dif- 
ficult boarding ramps, marine doors on the boat and the flight of steps 
between the staterooms, snack bar, cafeteria and small restrooms on the 
lower level and the observation lounges on the upper level. 

The dockside information building at Rock Harbor on the island 
and the walks to the concessioner facilities are accessible. All eating, 
housing and restroom facilities at Rock Harbor and Windigo have two 
to four steps or steep grades. One of the two-story lodge units at Rock 
Harbor has a ramp to the second story but the asphalt walk to the ramp 
has a steep grade. Most of the trails are rocky, rough and demand 
strenuous effort. 

Pamphlets and maps are available at the information building in 
Rock Harbor and interpretive programs are given throughout the visitor 
season, from approximately June 15 to Labor Day. 



Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore 

P.O. Box 40 

Munising, Michigan 49862 
(906) 387-2607 

Multicolored sandstone cliffs, broad beaches, sand bars, dunes, water- 
falls, inland lakes, ponds, marshes, hardwood and coniferous forests, 
and numerous birds and animals comprise this scenic area on Lake 
Superior. This was the first national lakeshore. 

The easiest way to see the panorama of Pictured Rocks is by tour boat. 
Eighty-foot (24.32 m) boats which are convenient and accessible make 
the cruise several times daily from Munising, the length of the park 
shore and return. Information about the tours may be obtained from Pic- 
tured Rock Tour, Munising, Michigan 49862. 

The only section of the area along the lake accessible by car is 
Miners Castle, 7 miles ( 1 1 .27 km) east of Munising off Highway 58. The 
parking lot at Miners Castle is within a few feet of the edge of the cliff 
on level ground. Approaches to the visitor center and Munising Falls, 
2-1/2 miles (4.02 km) east of Munising are asphalted and gently inclined. 
Bridges on the Munising Falls trail are hand/ailed and accessible al- 
though fairly steep. The entry of the visitor center, a converted building 



88 Michigan 



at Munising Falls, is from ground level with doors 32-inches (81.28 cm) 
wide. The restrooms are single rooms with doors 22-inches (55.88 cm) 
wide. Footing is good as floors are unwaxed. 

Interpretive programs are given at the visitor center during the 
summer season mid-June to Labor Day. The headquarters building is 
at Sand Point, 2 miles farther east off Highway 58, and is open all year. 
There are some exhibits in the headquarters building. 



Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore 

400^2 Mam Street 
Frankfort, Michigan 49635 
(616)352-9611 

Beaches, massive sand dunes, forests, and Jakes are outstanding char- 
acteristics of these two offshore islands— North and South Mamtou — and 
a section of Lake Michigan shoreline forming Sleeping Bear Dunes. 

The headquarters building on M22 in Frankfort is an information center 
in a converted house with no accessible restrooms. Fully accessible 
facilities, however, are at the nearby medical care center. 

The contact ranger station, open Memorial Day through October 1 , 
is about 23 miles (37.03 km) from the Frankfort headquarters on Ml 09, 
three miles (4.83 km) north of the village of Empire. Five steps lead up to 
the information desk and maritime exhibits in the visitor center and six 
steps down to the natural history museum. Both flights of steps are 
equipped with railings. Access by wheelchair is at the rear of the parking 
lot, through the garage at ground level and into the basement where the 
natural history museum is located. Walkways in the two campgrounds 
are unpaved and restrooms are primitive. 

Climbing or hiking the dunes is difficult, but commercial dunemobile 
rides to the top of the dunes, automobile rides, canoeing on Platte River 
and beach swimming are available. Conducted natural history tours can 
be arranged. 



Minnesota 89 



Grand Portage National Monument 

Box 666 

Grand Marais, Minnesota 55604 
(218)387-2788 

This 9-mile Grand Portage was once a rendezvous point of traders and 
trappers. It was also a principal route for Indians, explorers, and mis- 
sionaries into the Northwest. 

Authentic reconstructions, including the Great Hall, Kitchen and Canoe 
Warehouse, are accessible by ramps or short steps with handrails. 
Taped messages, displays, self-guiding folders and on-site interpretation 
are available for visitors. The steeply-rising, J^-mile (.8 km) Mount Rose 
Trail has steps and handrails. The Grand Portage Trail is QV2 miles (13.6 
km) long. 

Many points of interest are within 500 feet (150 m) of the paved 
parking area. A campground, picnic area and hotel accommodations 
are nearby. 

The Grand Portage post of the Northwest Comapny has been re- 
constructed. Watch for uneven ground and irregular steps. 

A small, temporary visitor center, up several steps from ground 
level, offers information, exhibits and audiovisual programs. The Great 
Hall, which is fully accessible, has exhibits and interpretive programs. A 
comfort station with fully accessible and equipped stalls is located 500 
feet ( 1 50 m) from the visitor center. 

The monument is off U.S. Highway 61, 36 miles northeast of Grand 
Marais, Minn. 



Pipestone National Monument 

P.O. Box 727 

Pipestone, Minnesota 56164 

(507)825-5463 

From this quarry Indians obtained materials for making peace pipes 

used in ceremonies. It is "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is accessible with all facilities on one floor Restroom 
outside doors are 31 inches (78.74 cm) wide, booth doors, 23 inches 
(58.42 cm). Some of the panel exhibits in the visitor center contain objects 
which may be touched and felt. The Circle Trail and old quarry are 
paved and accessible, although steep in places. 



St. Croix National Scenic River 

(See Wisconsin) 



90 Minnesota 



Voyageurs National Paik 

P.O. Box 50 

International Falls, Minnesota 56649 

(218)283-4492 

Once the route of the French-Canadian voyageurs, beautiful northern 

lakes are surrounded by forest in this land where geology and history 

capture your imagination. 

Visitors should first stop at park headquarters on Highway 53, at the 
south edge of International Falls, for information about the park, lodgings 
and restroom facilities. The park boundary is 1 1 miles (17.71 km) from 
the park headquarters. The parking lot at the temporary headquarters is 
gravel surfaced, but designated parking spaces are near the building. 
Restroom entry doors are 33 inches (83.80 cm) wide and stall doors 
29 inches (73.66 cm). Permanent headquarters, visitor center and other 
facilities are planned. 



Mississippi 91 



Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site 

c/o Natchez Trace Parkway, R.R. 1, NT- 143 

Tupelo, Mississippi 3880 1 

(601)842-1572 

The Confederate cavalry, under Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, was 

employed with extraordinary skill here during the battle of June 10, 

1864. 

The site is a well-marked one acre (0.404 ha), 6 miles (9.66 km) west of 

Baldwyn on Mississippi 370, 25 miles (40.25 km) north of Tupelo, off 

U.S. 45. The entire area is accessible. Markers and monuments provide 

interpretation. 



Gulf Islands National Seashore 

(See Florida) 



Natchez Trace Parkway 

R.R. 1, NT- 143 

Tupelo, Mississippi 3880 1 

This historic route generally follows the old Indian trace, or trail, between 

Nashville, Tennessee; and Natchez, Mississippi through the northwest 

corner of Alabama. About 317 miles (510.37 km) of the planned 443- 

mile trace (713.23 km) are completed. 

The Tupelo visitor center is 5 miles north of Tupelo at the intersection of 
Natchez Trace Parkway and U.S. 45-North. The parking area has desig- 
nated parking space, the curb has a ramp and entry into the visitor center 
is at ground level. Restroom entry doors are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide 
and stall doors are 26 inches (66.04 cm) wide. An entry door to the rest- 
rooms from outside the visitor center, open day and night, is 39 inches 
(99.06 cm) wide. 

The motor road is the mam parkway feature and most of the inter- 
pretive devices at overlooks can be seen without leaving the car. There 
are four audio stations along the parkway. Audiovisual programs are 
offered at the Tupelo visitor center and campfire programs at Rocky 
Springs are accessible by driving from the information station to the 
campground. At Mount Locust the exhibit shelter is accessible, but the 
historic hilltop house is reached by a series of six to eight steps. The 
Ridgeland wayside museum entrance has a 5-inch (12.7 cm) step. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Tupelo. 



92 Mississippi 



Tupelo National Battlefield 

c/o Natchez Trace Parkway, R.R.I, NT.- 1 43 

Tupelo, Mississippi 38801 

Here, on July 13-14, 1864, Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry battled 

a Union force of 14,000 sent to keep Forrest from cutting the railroad 

supplying Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's march on Atlanta. 

The battlefield is in Tupelo, one mile (1.61 km) off Natchez Trace Park- 
way, on Mississippi Highway 6. The entire area is accessible. Signs and 
markers provide interpretation. 



Vicksburg National Military Park 

P.O. Box 349 

Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180 

(601)636-0583 

Fortifications of the 47-day siege of Vicksburg, which ended July 3, 1863, 

are remarkably preserved here. Victory gave the North control of the 

Mississippi River and cut the Confederacy in two. This is a "Living History" 

area. 

The park is just outside of Vicksburg on historic U.S. 80. The visitor 
center is entered at ground level from the parking lot which has a curb 
ramp. Audiovisual programs and exhibits are on the first floor of the 
center. Restroom stalls are 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide, and the entry 
doors are 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide, swinging in from a negotiable 
right angle. 

Most features of the park are readily seen from the road. Guided 
tours or tape-tours are available for interpretation on the 16-mile (25.76 
km) park road. 



Missouri 93 



George Washington Carver National Monument 

P.O. Box 38 

Diamond, Missouri 64840 

(417)325-4151 

The site, birthplace and childhood home of George Washington Carver, 

the famous black agronomist, includes the 1881 house, Boy Carver 

statue, Carver family cemetery and a cultural demonstration area. 

Access to the visitor center is by ramp. A movie, museum and guided 
tours are available at all times. The first 100 yards (91.44 m) of the self- 
guiding Boy Carver Historic Nature Trail is paved and easily traveled, 
but the balance is unpaved and rough terrain. Park personnel are avail- 
able to give assistance. 

The park is 2 miles (3.22 km) from Diamond, Mo., and can be 
reached by taking Alternate 7 1 south from Interstate 44, then west on V 
Highway from Diamond. 



Jefferson National Expansion Memorial National Historic Site 

1 1 North Fourth Street 
St. Louis, Missouri 63102 
(314)425-4468 

This park on St. Louis' Mississippi riverfront honors Thomas Jefferson 
and others who directed territorial expansion of the United States. Eero 
Saannen's prize-winning, stainless steel gateway arch commemorates 
Westward pioneers. In the nearby courthouse, Dred Scott sued for free- 
dom m the historic slavery case. 

Visitors may ascend the 630-foot (191.52 m) high arch by elevator. The 
Gateway Arch Visitor Center is accessible by ramp. The center contains 
the spacious Museum of Westward Expansion. Restrooms are fully 
accessible. Special tours or other programs are available to groups by 
writing the superintendent two weeks in advance. The parking area is 
approximately 800 feet (243.68 m) from the visitor center. Assistance to 
reach the visitor center is available by contacting the parking lot 
attendants. 



Ozark National Scenic Riverways 

P.O. Box 490 

Van Buren, Missouri 63965 

(314)323-4236 

For about 140 miles the Current and Jacks Fork Rivers flow through a 

quiet world of nature at this national park area. Features include huge 

freshwater springs and numerous caves. 

The visitor center at Powder Mill is 35 miles (56.35 km) north of Van 
Buren, off State Highway 106. Maps, interpretive folders and general 



94 Missouri 



information are available at the information desk. The visitor center has a 
ground level entry. Restroom entry doors are 33 inches (83.80 cm) wide 
and stall doors 24 inches (60.96 cm) in the men's restroom, 27 inches 
(68.58 cm) in the women's restroom. The restrooms are on a very narrow 
corridor. 

New trails lead to campgrounds at Big Spring, 4 miles (6.44 km) 
south of Van Buren on Highway 103, Alley Spring, 7 miles (1 1.27 km) 
west of Eminence on Highway 106, and Round Spring, 13 miles (20.93 
km) north of Eminence on Highway 19. All trails provide relatively easy 
access to the area's prominent natural features. New comfort stations in 
these areas have been designed for full accessibility. 

Float trips can be tricky, even dangerous, for the unskilled. Other 
activities include shore fishing and camping. 

Medical centers are at Van Buren, and at Winona, which is about 
20 miles (32. 19 km) from Alley Spring and Powder Mill. 



Wilson's Creek National Battlefield 

c/o George Washington Carver National Monument 
P.O. Box 38 

Diamond, Missouri 64840 
(417)325-4151 

The Civil War battle of August 10, 1861, for control of Missouri was 
fought here. 

The park is five miles (8.05 km) from Republic, Mo., on Highway MM. 
There is a self -guiding tour of the battlefield. The restroom is in a trailer at 
the visitor center and is fully accessible. Construction of facilities, includ- 
ing a permanent visitor center, is in progress. 



Montana 95 



Big Hole National Battlefield 

Wisdom, Montana 59761 

(406) 689-2530 

Nez Perce Indians and U.S. Army troops fought here in 1877— a 

dramatic episode in the long struggle to confine the Nez Perce, and other 

Indians, to reservations. 

The visitor center is 12 miles (19.32 km) west of Wisdom on Montana 43, 
and is accessible without difficulty from the parking lot. The center, 
auditorium, museum and restrooms are all on ground level with double- 
door entrance. Restroom entry doors are 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide and 
stall doors, 24 inches (60.96 cm). 

The center features exhibits and audiovisual programs. The battle- 
field can be viewed from the audiovisual room as a narrator explains 
the battle. A side road has picnic tables adjacent to the parking area. The 
wooded siege area is a 5-mmute uphill climb of 600 yards (548.64 m). 
Fishing is allowed from the easily accessible and wide footbridge across 
the North Fork of the Big Hole River. 

The elevation at headquarters is 6,300 feet (1,918.98 m). Food, 
lodging and a full range of medical services can be found in Hamilton, 
65 miles (104.65 km) north and west of the visitor center on Montana 43 
and U.S. 93. 



Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area 

Fort Smith, Montana 59035. 

(406)666-2412 

Pighorn Lake, formed by Yellowtail Dam on the Bighorn River, extends 

71 miles (114.31 km) m Montana and Wyoming, including 47 miles 

(75.67 km) through spectacular Bighorn Canyon. The Crow Indian 

Reservation borders a large part of the area. Federal acreage is 34,231.20 

(1 3, 692 48 hectares) in Montana and 28, 623 00 in Wyoming. 

Access by land to this elongated scenic area is convenient only at the 
Northern District headquarters community of Fort Smith, Montana, 
and at the Southern District headquarters community of Lovell, Wyoming. 

Two visitor centers serve the park, one at Yellowtail Dam, under the 

jurisdiction of the Bureau of Reclamation, and the other near Lovell, 

Wyo. The visitor center at the dam has exhibits and listening devices 

and a protected vestibule overlooks the 525-foot (159.92 m) concrete 

dam. Restrooms at this center are inadequate for visitors in wheelchairs. 

The Lovell Visitor Center features audiovisual programs, exhibits 
and is solar operated. All facilities at this visitor center, including the rest- 
rooms, are fully accessible. 

Boat-launching facilities are reachable by automobile at three points 
on the lake. Restroom facilities at all three points are fully accessible. 
The campgrounds at Lovell have fully accessible restrooms, but the 
campgrounds at the north end of the lake have pit toilets. 



96 Montana 



The nearest restaurants, lodgings and hospitals are at Lovell, 
Wyo., and Hardin, Mont., which is 40 miles (64.04 km) north of Fort 
Smith on 1-90. 



Custer Battlefield National Monument 

P.O. Box 416 

Crow Agency, Montana 59022 

(406) 638-2622 

The famous Battle of the Little Big Horn between five companies of the 

7th U.S. Cavalry and the Sioux and Northern Cheyenne fndians was 

fought here on June 25-26, 1876. Lt. Col. George A. Custer and about 

268 of his force were killed. This is a "Living History" area. 

The headquarters and visitor center are in an old, concrete block build- 
ing, 2 miles (3.22 km) from the Crow Agency on 1-90. Parking is adjacent 
with curb ramps, but assistance may be needed to enter the building 
over three steps. Restrooms are entered from a narrow corridor at 
right angles; both entry and stall doors are 25 inches (63.5 cm) wide. 

Paved walkways lead to the national cemetery, the Custer Monu- 
ment, the Last Stand overlook and portions of the self-guiding Entrench- 
ment Trail. Interpretive talks are given at the visitor center. Interpretive 
signs on the battlefield road are designed for viewing from cars. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Hardin, 15 
miles (24. 1 5 km) north on 1-90. 



Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site 

(See North Dakota) 



Glacier National Park 

West Glacier, Montana 59936 

(406)888-5441 

Superb Rocky Mountain scenery with numerous glaciers and lakes 

among high peaks, forms part of the Waterton-Glacier International 

Peace Park. 

Significant features may be viewed by car at scenic overlooks on the 
major highway through the southern portion of the park, Gomg-to-the 
Sun Road. This road stems from U.S. Highway 89 at St. Mary. 

The St. Mary visitor center is accessible with wide walks and double 
doors, handrails where needed and accessible restrooms. The restrooms 
throughout the park have entry and stall doors 32 inches (8 1 .28 cm) wide. 

All park trails are unpaved with the exception of the walk at Logan 
Pass which has approximately a half mile (.805 km) of boardwalk leading 
to the unpaved section. The boardwalk has a few steps on inclined areas, 



Montana 97 



over which assistance would be needed for visitors in wheelchairs. 
Evening interpretive talks are given at Fish Creek and Apgar Camp- 
ground amphitheaters, McDonald Lodge and St. Mary visitor center. 
Evening programs are offered at Avalanche, Rising Run, Swiftcurrent and 
Two Medicine Campgrounds which are all accessible by hard-packed 
trail or by car driven to within 50 to 100 feet (15.2 to 30.4 m) of the 
facilities. 

The highest point by car is Logan Pass, 6,664 feet (2,029.85 m). The 
elevation of most facilities ranges from 3,210 to 4,500 feet (977.77 to 
1,370.70 m). Some units in the Many Glacier Hotel and Rising Sun Motor 
Inn are fully accessible. Reservations should be made for these units 
with Glacier Park, Inc., East Glacier, Montana 59434, telephone (406) 
226-4841. The facilities are open from May 15 to September 15. The 
nearest full range of medical facilities is at Cardston, Alberta, Canada, 
35 miles (56.35 km) north of St. Mary on U.S. 89 and North Valley 
Hospital in Whitefish, Montana, 24 miles (38.64 km) west of West Glacier 
on U.S. 93. 



Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site 

Deer Lodge, Montana 49722 
(406) 846-2070 

This was the headquarters area of one of the largest and best known 
19th-century range ranches in the country. Today the ranchhouse, 
bunkhouse and outbuildings are much as they were in the 1800 s. 



The ranch is 1/4 mile (0.4025 km) from Deer Lodge, off Interstate 90. 
All buildings, including the visitor contact station, are accessible in dry 
weather. A 1,100-foot (335.06 m) hard-packed gravel trail leads from 
the contact station to park buildings. The trail has ramps where neces- 
sary and is moderately steep in some areas. Guided tours of the house 
are available and park personnel will interpret the grounds upon request. 
Printed materials are available for self-guidance on trails around the 
ranch. The newly constructed comfort stations in a separate building are 
fully accessible and equipped. 

Elevation of the site is 4,200 feet (1,282.68 m). A full range of medi- 
cal services, restaurants and accessible lodgings is in Deer Lodge. The 
State has constructed rest areas throughout the length of Interstate 90, 
each with fully accessible and equipped comfort stations. 



Yellowstone National Park 

(See Wyoming) 



98 Nebraska 



Agate Fossil Beds National Monument 

c/o Scotts Bluff National Monument 
P.O. Box 427 
Gering, Nebraska 6934 1 
(308) 436-4340 

These renowned quarries contain numerous, concentrated, well-pre- 
served Miocene mammal fossils, representing an important chapter in 
the evolution of mammals. 

House trailers are used as temporary visitor center facilities, comfort 
station and ranger office. Three steps, 6-to-9-mches (15.24 to 22.86 cm) 
high, and about 10 feet (3.04 m) wide, lead up to both the visitor center 
and the comfort station. There is no ramp but park personnel assist 
persons up the steps. The door to the visitor center is 33 inches (83.82 
cm) wide. The door to the comfort station is 33I/2 inches (85.09 cm) wide. 
The stall doors in the restrooms are 21 inches (53.34 cm) wide. Visitor 
center floors are carpeted. 

Fossils are available to touch. A 1 -mile (1.61 km) dirt trail leads to the 
fossil beds with a rise in elevation of 200 feet (60.92 m), a round trip of 2 
miles (3.22 km). Three benches for stops along the trail are provided. 
Self-guiding literature is distributed at the visitor center. 

The monument is 22 miles (35.40 km) south of Harrison and 34 
miles (54.72 km) north of Mitchell, Neb. The nearest hospital is 45 miles 
(72.42 km) away, at Scottsbluff. 



Chimney Rock National Historic Site 

c/o Scotts Bluff National Monument 

P.O. Box 427 

Gering, Nebraska 69341 

(402) 436-4340 

Site telephone during summer months (402) 432-2793 

As they traveled west, pioneers camped near this famous landmark 

which stands 500 feet above the Platte River along the Oregon Trail It is 

an Affiliated Area. 

The visitor center is an information trailer with no other public facilities. 
The trailer is located on a turn-off from Highway 92, 23 miles (37.03 km) 
east of Gering, Neb. and 3^ miles (5.63 km) southwest of Bayard. It is on 
site only from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The site, owned by the State 
of Nebraska, is staffed during the summer by personnel of the State 
historical society. 



Homestead National Monument of America 

Beatrice, Nebraska 68310 

(402)223-3514 

Under the Homestead Act of 1862, one of the first claims was filed for 

this land, ft is a "Living Historical Farm " area. 



Nebraska 99 



All features are accessible over relatively easy, level paths. A ramp 
crosses the 4-inch ( 10. 16 cm) parking area curb. The visitor center, with 
an audiovisual room, museum and farm implement display shed, has 
6-foot (1.83 m) wide entry and exit doors. Restrooms have entry doors 
31 inches (78.74 m) wide, stall doors are 24^ inches (62.23 cm) wide. 

Visitors may view the cabin interior from a 24-mch doorway. A 
paved trail footbridge accommodates wheelchairs up to 40 inches (1 m) 
wide. The trail has a short, steep pitch of 9 l /k percent gradient for about 
88 feet (26.80 m). From a sample prairie grass and forb plot at the end of 
the trail, the native prairie portion of the monument may be viewed. 
Conducted tours can be arranged with advance notice. 

There are four audio programs in the visitor center and one trailside 
audio program. On request, park personnel will guide visually handi- 
capped visitors through the equipment display shed. 

The best time to visit the park is weekends between Memorial Day 
and Labor Day, when Living History demonstrations take place. 

Medical services and hospital facilities are available in Beatrice, 5 
miles (8.05 km) from the monument. 



Scotts Bluff National Monument 

P.O. Box 427 

Gering, Nebraska 6934 1 

(308) 436-4340 

Rising 800 feet above the valley floor, this massive promontory was a 

landmark on the Oregon Trail, associated with mass migration between 

1843 and 1869 across the Great Plains. 

The entire area, including the visitor center with its Oregon Trail museum, 
is accessible. An asphalt ramp leads into the museum from the parking 
area. Visitor center restroom doors are 29j^ inches (74.93 cm) wide, 
stall doors, 25^ inches (64.77 cm). Grab bars are installed in the rest- 
rooms. 

The outdoor amphitheater is reached by a level, paved walk. At the 
summit of Scotts Bluff, several paved walks lead to: South Summit over- 
look, 9.2-percent gradient at the steepest park; High Point overlook, 
16.3-percent gradient at the steepest part; and Observation Point, 18.7- 
percent gradient at the steepest part. A walk leading to the Jackson 
Campsite at Mitchell Pass has a 13.3-percent gradient at the steepest 
part. A self-guiding nature trail is accessible with a minimum amount of 
assistance needed on steeper parts. 

Interpretive talks and campfire programs are held at the amphi- 
theater. Informal talks are given at the museum. A Living History pro- 
gram is presented during the summer months near the visitor center. 

The high point of the summit is about 4,649 feet (1,416.09 m). The 
road from the visitor center to the summit rises about 500 feet (152.30 
cm) in 1-3/4 miles (2.82 km). Medical services are available in Gering, 3 
miles (3.22 km) away and hospitals are in Scottsbluff, 7 miles (1 1.27 km). 



100 Nevada 



Death Valley National Monument 

(See California) 



Lake Mead National Recreation Area 

601 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 

(702)293-4041 

Lake Mead in Nevada, formed by Hoover Dam, and Lake Mohave m 

Arizona, formed by Davis Dam, both on the Colorado River, dominate 

this first national recreation area established by Congress. 

The Alan Bible visitor center at Lake Mead, on U.S. Highway 93, is four 
miles (6.44 km) east of Boulder City. Bus and airline services are avail- 
able to Las Vegas where accessible tour buses can be taken for the trip 
to Lake Mead. A good paved road system makes each developed unit 
of the area accessible by passenger car. The lakes can best be seen by 
boat, also accessible. All visitor centers are fully accessible from paved 
parking areas and approach walks; motel and eating facilities throughout 
both lake areas are accessible at ground level. All restrooms in eating 
establishments, except at Overton, are accessible. The Cottonwood 
Cove motel has bathrooms designed for visitors in wheelchairs. Two 
fish hatcheries, located at Willow Beach and Boulder Beach, are accessible. 

Paved walks lead to amphitheaters at Kathenne, Boulder Beach and 
Temple Bar, where evening programs are given during the summer. 
Upon request, interpretive programs are given to special groups. A 
booklet, "Boating Guide to Lake Mohave," gives mileage to points of 
interest reached by boat. A fully accessible commercial boat trip to 
Hoover Dam and return embarks daily from the Lake Mead Marina. An 
auto tape tour, starting at the Alan Bible visitor center, identifies points 
of interest, significant natural features and flora and fauna seen along 
the 40-mile (64.37-km) drive to Echo Bay. Exhibits and audio-visual 
programs are presented in the Alan Bible visitor center. A desert botani- 
cal garden, ad]acent to the visitor center, has interpretive signs de- 
scribing the desert environment. The trail through the garden is paved. 

Average elevation is 2,448 feet (746. 15 m). 



Lehman Caves National Monument 

Baker, Nevada 893 11 
(702) Lehman Caves, 
# 1 Toll Station via Ely, Nevada 

Tunnels and galleries decorated with stalactites and stalagmites honey- 
comb these caverns of light-gray and white limestone. 

The visitor center is five miles (8.05 km) west of Baker, which is five miles 
(8.05 km) off U.S. Highway 6/50. Public buildings with displays and in- 
terpretive programs, a restroom, and the concession building are all 



Nevada 101 



accessible to visitors in wheelchairs at ground level from a service road 
behind the visitor center. One restroom has an entry door and stall doors 
22 inches (55.88 cm) wide. 

From Easter weekend through September, a restaurant and lodg- 
ings are open in Baker. Nearest full medical service is 70 miles ( 1 12.7 km) 
away at Ely on U.S. Highway 6/50. 

The cave tour is 0.6 mile (0.97 km) in length and lasts 1 1/2 hours. 
Visitors taking tour must ascend or descend 15 flights of stairs. Fifteen- 
minute tours of the first room and to the Lodge Room through the exit 
tunnel are available for visitors for whom the extended cave trip would 
be too strenuous. A 1/4-mile (402-km) nature trail starting at the visitor 
center is rough, narrow, and without handrails. 

The average elevation of main features is 6,825 feet (2,078.90 m). 



102 New Hampshire 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site 

Cornish Flats, New Hampshire 

(603) 675-2055 

Mailing address: Windsor, Vermont 05089 

A memorial to the great American sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, 

containing his home, studios and grounds, named "Aspet. " is a "Living 

History" area. 

The walk-in area has no barriers; level grounds provide access to the 
Temple, the Little Studio, the new studio, the studio by the ravine, and 
the Shaw, Adams and Farragut memorials. A barrier-free overlook 
provides a fine view of the mountains. First floor tours of the house are 
given. 

The visitor center is 100 feet (30.48 m) from the parking lot and three 
7-inch (18 cm) steps lead to the mam walkway. Restrooms are not 
equipped for wheelchairs. Special audio programs are available for 
visually handicapped visitors. 



New Jersey 103 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area 

(See Pennsylvania) 



Edison National Historic Site 

Mam Street at Lakeside Avenue 

West Orange, New Jersey 07052 

(201)736-0550 

Buildings, laboratories and equipment used by Thomas A. Edison for 

many of his experiments are found m this area. Sites include his library 

papers, models of some of his inventions plus his 23-room home, Glen- 

m on t. ft is a ' Li vm g History ' ' area . 

Cars carrying wheelchaired visitors may park in the laboratory unit near 
the start of the tour. Such visitors are advised to contact the visitor center 
at the laboratory in advance so that movable ramps can be arranged 
over the steps leading to the house. The Black Maria— a film room — is 
not accessible. Ramps lead up to the restrooms. 

The visually handicapped will enjoy the tours. Groups of deaf 
visitors have come to the site with their own interpreters and found the 
site equally interesting from a visual viewpoint. 



Gateway National Recreation Area 

(See New York) 



Morristown National Historical Park 

P.O.Box 1136R 

Morristown, New Jersey 07960 

(201)766-4990 

Sites of important military encampments during the Revolutionary War; 

Washington's headquarters 1777 and 1779-80. It is a "Living History" 

area. 

Jockey Hollow Visitor Center may be reached by automobile from Mor- 
ristown by proceeding southwest on Western Avenue until it becomes 
Jockey Hollow Road. The visitor center is approximately 2 miles (3.22 
km) on Jockey Hollow Road after the name change. Directions and infor- 
mation for all the other sites may be obtained at the Jockey Hollow Visitor 
Center. 

There are no barriers to wayside exhibits at Jockey Hollow, the 
Center itself is entirely accessible, as are the hospital and Grand Parade 



104 New Jersey 



sites. The first floor of the historical museum and basement restrooms are 
accessible, the latter by outside ground level path. The Ford Mansion, 
however, has five entrance steps and the stairs to the second floor are 
steep and narrow. Six 7-inch (18 cm) steps lead to the Wick House. The 
trail to the Soldiers' Huts is steep, but there are no steps. Regularly 
scheduled guided talks and tours will be of interest to all. Visually handi- 
capped visitors are allowed to hold and touch equipment and tools used 
in history demonstrations. 



Statue of Liberty National Monument (and Ellis Island) 

(See New York) 



New Mexico 105 



Aztec Ruins National Monument 

BoxU 

Aztec, New Mexico 87410 
(505)334-6174 

The rums of a large Pueblo Indian community with 12th-century build- 
ings of masonry and timber are now largely excavated and stabilized. 
The area, misnamed by early American settlers, has no connection with 
the Aztec Empire of Mexico. 

Portable ramps provide access over steps from the parking lot to the 
visitor center, museum and plaza. Restroom entry doors are 29-inches 
(73.66 cm) wide and stall doors 24 inches (60.96 cm). 

The rums are reached by many flights of steps, each ranging from 5 
to 15 steps. Two-thirds of the interpretive trail, however, permits wheel- 
chair travel with assistance over some steep grades. Talks and conducted 
tours are given on advance request. 

The average elevation is 5,640 feet (1,719m). 

Food, lodging and medical facilities are available in Aztec, a short 
distance south on U.S. 550. 



Bandelier National Monument 

Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 

(505)672-3861 

On the canyon-slashed slopes of the Pajanto Plateau are the rums of 

many cliff houses of Pueblo Indians. The monument's 30,000 acres 

(12,120 ha) were set aside by Congress m 1916 to protect the prehistoric 

treasures dating from AD 1200 to 1500. 

The visitor center, 3 miles (4.83 km) inside the monument, is 10 miles 
(16.1 km) north of White Rock and 13 miles (20.93 km) west of Los 
Alamos, both on New Mexico Highway 4. The parking area has desig- 
nated spaces and ramps and the visitor center is accessible by ramp. 
Restroom facilities, entered at sidewalk level, have 30-mch (76.20-cm) 
wide entry doors and 23-1/2-inch (59.69 cm) wide stall doors. (Fully 
accessible restrooms are planned for 1978.) The concessioner-run 
snackbar on the opposite side of the parking lot is accessible at ground 
level. 

The 1-mile (1.61 km) round-trip trail from near the visitor center to 
the mam rum of Tyuonyi is paved and level. The rum can be viewed from 
the trail The Cottonwood picnic area and scenic overlooks are all 
accessible. Audiovisual orientation programs are presented in the visitor 
center at any time during the day upon request. Evening campfire pro- 
grams are given at Juniper campground, just inside the entrance road on 
Mesa Top. Contour maps and models for touching by visitors with visual 
impairment are available. 



106 New Mexico 



Capulin Mountain National Monument 

Capulin, New Mexico 88414 

(505)278-2781 

Located in the country's easternmost volcanic field, this symmetrical 

cinder cone is an interesting example of a geologically recent, extinct 

volcano. 

The visitor center is accessible by ramp from the parking area to side- 
walk and terrace. Door openings, including restroom doors, are at 
least 31 inches (78.74 cm) wide with stall doors at least 29 inches (73.66 
cm). A 375-foot (1 14.0 m) level nature trail starting from the visitor center 
is also accessible by a ramp. Many tables in the picnic area are accessible. 
Ramps at the Crater Rim parking area give access to views of the crater 
and surrounding country. The crater trails, both down into the crater 
and on the rim. present difficulties as they are steep and with many 
steps. 

Audiovisual programs are offered at the visitor center and informal 
talks are given at the Crater Rim in the summer. 

Elevations range from 7,240 feet (2200.96 m) to 8, 182 feet (2491.36 
m). The monument is located about 3^ miles (5.63 km) from Capulin on 
State Route 325. Snacks and sandwiches may be obtained in Capulin, 
but the nearest full service center, providing medical facilities, accessible 
lodgings and restaurants, is Raton, NM, 30 miles (48.30 km) west on US 
64-87, to Interstate 25. 



Carlsbad Caverns National Park 

3225 National Parks Highway 

Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 

(505) 885-8884 

Park visitor center (505) 785-2233 

This series of connected caverns, the largest underground chambers yet 

discovered, has countless magnificent and curious formations. 

The park is 20 miles (32.20 km) southwest of Carlsbad, off U.S. Highway 
62-180. Turn right on State Road 7 at White City. 

The visitor center with a restaurant and a gift shop is reached by 
low ramps (providing access) from parking areas. Elevators carry visitors 
to the underground lunchroom and entrance to the Big Room, 754 feet 
(230 m) below ground level. All visitors can take part in the Big Room 
tour. Visitor center and the caverns' restrooms have one stall, each suit- 
able for wheelchairs. An interpretive talk is offered at the cavern entrance 
each evening in summer. 

Visitors in wheelchairs can travel 1,375 feet (419 m) out into the 
Big Room to view the Hall of Giants Fairyland and Temple of the Sun, 
which are among the most scenic and spectacular formation areas in 
the cavern. Talks on the migratory bat colony are given at the cavern 
entrance each evening during the summer. The full cavern tour is a 30 



New Mexico 107 



mile (48.3 km) walk with an 800-foot (244 m) descent and an 80-foot 
(24.4 m) climb. 

Elevation on the mam road is 3,600 to 4,400 feet (1,096.56 to 
1,340.24 m). Average elevation of mam features is 4,000 feet (1,218.40 m). 



Chaco Canyon National Monument 

SR #4, Box 6500, Bloomfield, New Mexico 874 1 3 
(505) 786-5384 

The canyon contains 13 major Indian rums and hundreds of smaller 
rums unsurpassed in the United States. They exhibit the finest prehis- 
toric architecture and represent the high point of Pueblo pre-Columbian 
civilization. 

The visitor center is located 40 miles (64.37 km) north of Crownpomt 
on New Mexico State Highway 57, and 30 miles (48.28 km) south of 
Blanco Trading Post on the same state highway. The visitor center is 
accessible from the parking lot 60 feet (17.5 m) away by paved walkway. 
Entry doors are 72 inches ( 1 m 82 cm) wide. Inside the restrooms, doors 
are 26 inches (66.04 cm) wide. 

Several conducted tours are offered daily in the summer; there 
usually is one tour a day in the spring and fall. Campfire talks are given 
nightly in the summer. All of the major rums are on level ground, four 
miles (6.44 km) or more from the visitor center. A parking area is pro- 
vided at each of the major rums. All trails and parking areas at the rums 
are of pea-gravel. Some doors are narrow. Assistance of park personnel 
can be arranged for visits to the smaller nearby rums. 

The average elevation is 6,200 feet ( 1 ,888.52 m). Emergency medical 
services are available at the Navajo Public Health Service Hospital 40 
miles (64.37 km) south at Crownpoint. The nearest towns, food, supplies 
and lodging are on State Highway 44 and U.S. 40. 



El Morro National Monument 

Ramah, New Mexico 8732 1 
(505)783-5123 

"Inscription Rock" is a soft sandstone monolith on which are carved 
hundreds of inscriptions, including those of 17th-century Spanish ex- 
plorers and 19th-century American emigrants and settlers. The monu- 
ment also includes pre-Columbian petroglyphs. 

The monument is 58 miles (93.38 km) southeast of Gallup via NM Routes 
32 and 53, and 43 miles (69.23 km) west of Grants via Route 53. The 
visitor center is 30 feet (9.14 m) from the ramped parking area. The 
center and restrooms are fully accessible and on one level. Although the 
Inscription Rock Trail has some rather steep grades, at least two-thirds 
of the inscriptions may be viewed via a by-pass around the visitor center. 
The picnic area is ^-mile (.80 m) from the parking area, but the ground 



108 New Mexico 



is somewhat uneven. Campfire talks are held in the picnic-campground 
area during the summer season. 

Elevation of the visitor center is 7,218 feet (2,198.60 m). Food, 
lodging and medical facilities are available in Grants, 43 miles east of the 
park. 



Fort Union National Monument 

Watrous, New Mexico 87753 

(505) 425-8025 

Adobe rums of this key fort and largest military supply depot on the 

Santa Fe Trail, which shaped Southwest destiny from 1851-1891, have 

been stabilized to prevent further deterioration. Soldiers garrisoned 

three successive Fort Unions. 

The park headquarters and visitor center are 8 miles (12.88 km) north- 
west of Watrous at the end of State Highway 477. Concrete ramps in 
the parking lot and at the porch provide access to the visitor center. The 
self-guiding trail is 1 Vz miles long, but direct access to the rums is less 
than 300 yards (273.6 m). The trail is generally smooth, but some flag- 
stone sections and graveled sections may present difficulties. Restroom 
doors are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide, stall doors 20 inches (50.80 cm). 

Two audio stations are available less than 150 yards (136.4 m) from 
the visitor center. Taped bugle calls and a taped retreat parade may be 
enjoyed at the rear of the visitor center. 

Elevation is 6,700 feet (2,040.82 m). Food, lodgings and medical 
services are available 30 miles (48.30 km) south on Interstate 25 in Las 
Vegas. 



Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument 

Route 2, Box 100 

Silver City, New Mexico 88061 

These well-preserved cliff dwellings in natural cavities on the face of 

an overhanging cliff were inhabited from about A.D. 100 to 1300. 

The monument is at the end of a winding, mountainous road (State 
Route 15) 43 miles (68.8 km) north of Silver City. Visitors in wheelchairs 
enter the visitor center from the rear by ramp over two steps. The rear 
parking lot is 100 feet (30.48 m) from the center. The front entrance has 
five steps to the porch and double doors to foyer and exhibit room. 
Visitors in wheelchairs may park directly in front of the parking area 
restrooms. Entry is over ramps. Restroom doors measure 31 inches 
(78.74 cm), stall doors 24 inches (60.96 cm) in width. Plans are underway 
to expand and improve these facilities. 

The cliff dwellings and steeply inclined approach trail have many 
steps. The cliff dwellings' parking lots are two miles (3.22 km) from the 



New Mexico 109 



visitor center. Camprgounds and picnic areas, some equipped with 
vault toilets, are spaced along the road to the cliff dwellings. 

Assistance is provided to traverse the graveled trail to the site 50 
feet (15.23 m) from the visitor center, where evening programs are pre- 
sented. On request, organized groups may use the long trail and tour 
the dwellings with the assistance of park personnel. 

Average elevation is 5,700 feet (1,736.22 m). Nearest food, lodging 
and medical services are at Silver City. Gila Cliff Dwellings National 
Monument is managed by the Forest Service (U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture) under a cooperative agreement with National Park Service. 



Gran Quivira National Monument 

Route 1, Mountamair, New Mexico 87036 

(505)847-2770 

Rums of two mission buildings and 18 Pueblo Indian excavated house 

mounds mark the sites of this 17th-century Spanish mission and of an 

earlier Indian community. 

Park headquarters and visitor center are located on State Highway 14, 
26 miles (41.84 km) south of U.S. Route 60 and Mountainair. Ramps 
provide access over the parking area curb and entry to the visitor center. 
Ramps and floor widths provide full accessibility throughout the center. 
Fully accessible and equipped restrooms are being or have been con- 
structed. 

The gravel trail around the grounds of the monument has a gradient 
of more than eight percent in two stretches, one of 170 feet (51.8 m) and 
the other of 30 feet (9. 14 m) in length. Park personnel are available during 
the summer months for those who need assistance in crossing the loose 
graveled paths. Exhibits, interpretive programs and audiovisual slide 
shows are offered in the visitor center, and guided tours are offered 
through the rums. 

Elevations of outstanding features range from 6,470 to 6,670 feet 
(1970.76 to 2031.68 m). The nearest food, lodging and medical facilities 
are available in Mountamair, 26 miles (4 1 .84 km) from the monument. 



Pecos National Monument 

P.O. Drawer 1 1 

Pecos, New Mexico 87552 

(505)757-6414 

Foundations of a 17th-century mission church, rums of an 18th-century 

church, ancient pueblo structural remains and restored kivas comprise 

the park. This site was once a landmark on the Santa Fe Trail. Ruts are 

still visible. 

Facilities are simple and minimum The visitor center at ground level, 



110 New Mexico 



the lunchground and summer Living History demonstrations are adja- 
cent to the hard-packed gravel parking area. The restrooms are pit 
toilets, 400 feet (121.84 m) from the visitor center. Fully accessible rest- 
rooms are planned for the near future. 

Trails are dirt surface, hard packed and level but somewhat rough 
or gravelly in spots. A self-guiding interpretive trail leads to the rums of 
two pueblos, two churches and the convent and several excavated, 
unroofed kivas. The trail is 3/4 mile (1.21 km) long. Access to the fully 
restored kivas is by ladder. Elevation is 6,900 feet (2,101.74 m). Food, 
lodging and medical facilities are available in Pecos, 2 miles (3.22 km) 
south. 



White Sands National Monument 

P.O. Box 458 

Alamogordo, New Mexico 88310 

(505)437-1058 

Dunes of glistening white gypsum sands— 10 to 45 feet high (3.05 to 

13.71 m)—are home for small, light-colored animals that have adapted 

to the harsh environment of this national monument. 

The visitor center is 15 miles (24.15 km) southwest of Alamogordo on 
U.S. Highway 70-82. Facilities include a musuem, gift shop and an audi- 
torium with slide programs. The center is easily accessible from the park- 
ing area and a ramp with handrails runs between the lobby and the 
museum. The outside restroom is inaccessible for wheelchair visitors. 
Fully accessible restrooms are available 6 miles (9.66 km) beyond the 
visitor center on the loop drive to the heart of the dunes. 

The significant features are best enjoyed by car or climbing the 
dunes. A self-guiding drive to the heart of the dunes is correlated with 
roadside numbered stations. A summer interpretive program, called the 
"Evening Stroll," describes the natural features of the dunes area. Getting 
there, however, would be difficult for visitors with mobility impairment 
because of the soft sand. 

Average elevation of the mam features is 4,000 feet (1,218.40 m). 
Restaurants, lodgings and medical services are in Alamogardo. 



New York 1 1 1 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Castle Clinton National Monument 

c/o Manhattan Sites 

National Park Service 

26 Wall Street 

New York, New York 10005 

(212) 264-87 1 1 ; site telephone (212) 344-7220 

Located near Battery Park at the top of Manhattan Island, Castle Clinton 

was built around 1808- 1 1 and served successively as a defense for New 

York Harbor, as a promenade and entertainment center, ft also served 

as an immigration depot where more than 8 million people entered the 

United States from 1855-90. A small museum and officers quarters and 

courtyard are now open to the public. Basically noted as a visual site. 

Visitors handicapped in movement are advised to contact the site so 
that assistance can be provided down three entrance steps to the monu- 
ment; the monument itself is located on level ground. Restroom facilities 
are located nearby in Battery Park. These facilities were built in the 1930's 
and have three 8-inch (20.32 cm) steps at the entrances. 



Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site 

c/o Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Sites 

Hyde Park, New York 12538 

(914)229-9115 

Mrs. Roosevelt used her "Val-KiU" estate as a personal retreat from her 

busy life. The pastoral setting of the cottage, built for her by her husband 

in 1924, includes fields, trees, swamps and ponds. She also used the 

estate to entertain friends and dignitaries and to promote the many 

causes which interested her. 

This is a new area, authorized May 27, 1977. There are no Federal 
facilities. 



Federal Hall National Memorial 

c/o Manhattan Sites 

National Park Service 

26 Wall Street 

New York, New York 10005 

(2 1 2) 264-87 1 1 ; (site telephone the same) 

A graceful building on the site of the original Federal Hall at 26 Wall 

Street. The site is noted for the convening of the Stamp Act Congress in 

1765, the Second Continental Congress in 1783, and as the site where 



1 1 2 New York 



George Washington took the oath of office as President. The Bill of 
Rights was adopted here in 1789. The John Peter Zenger trial for free- 
dom of the press also was held at this site in 1735. It is a "Living History" 
area. 

The memorial has 18 7-inch (17.78 cm) front steps. The upper deck, 
where the statues are located, and the descriptive plaques on the ex- 
tenor of the building may be viewed from the street, although inade- 
quately. A ramp for wheelchairs provides access to the interior from the 
rear of the building on Pine Street. An elevator now provides access to 
the restroom facilities and the second floor. Visitors who may require 
assistance are advised to call Federal Hall for personally guided tours. 



Fire Island National Seashore 

P.O. Box 229 

Patchogue, New York 1 1772 
(516)289-4810 

Barrier island with outstanding qualities of natural history and opportuni- 
ties for beach-oriented recreation in proximity to the New York metro- 
politan area. 

The seashore facilities are reached only by public ferry or private boat. 
Public ferries run from May 15 to October 15. Elevated wooden board- 
walks with ramps and steps provide access to the beach. A primitive 
camping site is located a rough 1-mile hike from the ferry dock. Camp- 
ing is limited to 4 nights on a reserved basis only. 



Fort Stanwix National Monument 

1 1 2 East Park Street 

Rome, New York 1 3440 

(315)336-2090 

The original Fort Stanwix was built during the French and Indian War 

and later used as a trading post. During the Revolutionary War, the siege 

of the fort was a victory for the colonists. The present fort was completely 

reconstructed and dedicated in 1 976. 

Gravel walkways are throughout the grounds. All areas have small in- 
clines rather than steps. Doorways are 2 feet, 10 inches (.86 m) by 5 feet, 
1 1 inches ( 1 .8 m). The parking area is located two blocks from the site. At 
the site, park personnel will be available to assist visitors and provide 
interpretive talks. 



New York 1 1 3 



Gateway National Recreation Area N.Y.-N.J. 
Floyd Bennett Field 

Brooklyn, New York 11234 

(212)252-9150 

Gateway National Recreation Area is one of the first urban parks m the 

National Park System. The goals intended for Gateway and its role m 

fulfilling recreation needs have a special dimension. They recognize the 

need not only to set aside the remaining natural areas still untouched by 

urban sprawl, but also to meet many urban recreation needs. 

Gateway National Recreation Area consists of four units. Three are in 
New York: Jamaica Bay Unit in Brooklyn, Breezy Point in Queens and 
the Staten Island Unit in Staten Island. The fourth area is the Sandy Hook 
Unit in New Jersey. 

At each unit, the visitor will find facilities for swimming, picnicking, 
sunbathing, sports, cultural, educational and interpretive programs. 
Nearby urban dwellers are given the opportunity to experience nature 
and recreation. Each unit contains some facilities for the handicapped 
visitor, such as ramps and restroom facilities accessible to visitors in 
wheelchairs but not all areas contain these facilities. The park does 
provide programs for senior citizens and handicapped visitors. Inter- 
ested groups or individuals should contact the units prior to their visits 
for the exact areas and activities able to accommodate them. Descrip- 
tions, address and telephone numbers of the units follow: 

Jamaica Bay Unit — Jamaica Bay's 17,000 acres comprise the largest 
nature refuge in New York City. Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, 
New York 1 1 234, (212) 252-9286. 

Breezy Point Unit — Situated on the Rockaway Peninsula in Brook- 
lyn, Breezy Point will soon offer a variety of recreational facilities. At 
this time, only Jacob Rns Park is open. Fort Tilden, New York 11695, 
(212)474-4600. 

Staten Island Unit — Located on the Rantan Bay in Staten Island, 
this unit, comprising Great Kills Park and Miller Field Park, provides 
a wide range of recreational activities. P.O. Box 37, Staten Island, 
New York 1 0306, (2 1 2) 35 1 -8700. 

Sandy Hook Unit — Located on a peninsula in the northeast corner 
of New Jersey, Sandy Hook Unit provides visitors with outdoor 
water activities, a beach and opportunities for nature study. P.O. 
Box 437, Highlands, New Jersey 07732, (201) 872-01 15. 

For additional general information on all units, contact the 
Office of External Affairs, Gateway National Recreation Area, Head- 
quarters Building 69, Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, New York 
11234,(212)252-9208. 



114 New York 



General Grant National Memorial 

c/o Manhattan Sites 

National Park Service 

26 Wall Street 

New York, New York 10005 

Site address: (in Riverside Park) 

West 1 22nd Street and Riverside Drive 

(212)666-1640 
A memorial to Ulysses S. Grant, who commanded the Union armies 
and brought the Civil War to an end. Here are the tombs of General and 
Mrs. Grant. As President of the United States (1869-77), Grant signed 
the act establishing the first national park, Yellowstone, m 1872. 

The Community Mosaic Bench project, an intricately designed group of 
benches in blue mosaic, surrounds the grounds. Informal interpretive 
talks are given daily. Assistance can be arranged by contacting the 
memorial headquarters. 



Hamilton Grange National Memorial 

c/o Manhattan Sites 

National Park Service 

New York, New York 10005 

(212)264-8700 

Site address: 287 Convent Avenue (north of 141st Street) 

(212)283-5154 
Home of Alexander Hamilton, one of the country's great statesmen. 

Ten 7-mch (18 cm) steps lead up to the house. Visitors are advised to 
call the memorial for guided tours and assistance. 



Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site 

Hyde Park, New York 12538 

(914)229-9115 

Birthplace, home and "Summer White House" of the 32nd President of 

the United States (1933-45) where many distinguished visitors were 

entertained. Also contains the rose garden where the President and Mrs. 

Roosevelt are buried. 

The parking area has curb-cuts and steps to the home have ramps. The 
second floor and restroom facilities are not now accessible to visitors 
in wheelchairs. The pulley-operated elevator used by the President is not 
operative at this time. Restrooms are in a small building behind the home 
or in the Archives of the Roosevelt Library across the driveway from 
the home. Personnel at the Library will be glad to operate the elevator 
to the second floor of the Library for use of the restrooms on that floor. 



New York 115 



Martin Van Buren National Historic Site 

Kinderhook, New York 12106 

(518)758-9689 

Called "Lmdenwald" this was the home of the 8th President of the 

United States. 

Not open to the public. Full visitor facilities are likely by 1982. 



Sagamore Hill National Historic Site 

Cove Neck Road 

Oyster Bay, Long Island 

New York 11771 

(516)922-4447 

Home of Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States, from 

1 885 un hi his dea th in 191 9. 

Garden paths and walkways around the house are accessible, as is the 
first floor of the home, but assistance may be needed up the three 7 1/2- 
inch (19 cm) steps to the entrance. Visitors may also need assistance at 
the Old Orchard Museum where three rooms are accessible. A bio- 
graphical film is shown in the museum every hour. Informal interpretive 
talks are given throughout the home. Visitors are encouraged to contact 
the site in advance, if possible, to arrange for assistance and guided 
tours. The site is open seven days a week. 



Saratoga National Historical Park 

R.D. l,Box 113C 

Stillwater, New York 12170 

(518)664-9822 

Scene of an American victory over the British m 1777; turning point of 

the Revolution and one of the decisive battles m world history; General 

Philip Schuyler's country home. It is a "Living History" area. 

Assistance will be needed from the parking lot to the visitor center as the 
ramp is steep. The historic houses have one or two steps at entrances. 
Surfaced walkways throughout the park are accessible but the houses 
are widely dispersed. Guided talks are available and visual and lecture 
programs are available at the visitor center. 



Statue of Liberty National Monument (and Ellis Island) N Y -N J 

Liberty Island, New York 10004 

(212)732-1236 

The statue is a gift from the French people to commemorate the 

alliance of France and the U.S. in the American Revolution. Ellis Island, 



116 New York 



near Liberty Island, was the mam entry point to the U.S. m the late 19th 
and early 20th centuries. 

Liberty Island is accessible but help may be needed getting up the steps 
to the buildings as well as into the elevator in the pedestal. The elevator 
runs from the first floor to the tenth floor landing. From there, six 7 1/2- 
inch (19.05 cm) steps lead to the balcony where one can enjoy an excel- 
lent view of the harbor. The American Museum of Immigration is in 
structural additions to the pedestal. 

The best time to visit the Statue of Liberty is in the autumn and 
winter months when the area is less crowded. A pamphlet is printed in 
Braille. Visitors may call the monument in advance of the trip to arrange 
for any needed assistance. The island is reached by ferry which leaves 
Battery Park (near Castle Clinton) at the lower tip of Manhattan Island, 
New York, N.Y. 

Ellis Island is presently undergoing extensive restoration. It is open 
in the summer on a limited basis, but visitors could encounter difficult 
or hazardous conditions. 



Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site 

c/o Manhattan Sites 

National Park Service 

26 Wall Street 

New York, New York 10005 

(212)264-8711 

Site address: 28 East 20th Street 

(212)260-1616 
Birthplace in 1858 of the 26th President of the United States. 

Visitors are advised to contact the site for assistance with the six steps 
down to the entrance of the building and two additional steps down to 
the museum. An elevator runs to the third floor and provides access to 
restroom facilities. Informal talks are given. There is no on- or off-street 
parking. 



Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site 

c/o Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Foundation 

64 1 Delaware Avenue 

Buffalo, New York 14209 

(716)884-0095 

Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office as President of the United 

States at the Ansley Wilcox House, now a National Historic Site, on 

Sept. 14, 1901, after the assassination of President William Mckinley. 

The house is entered over a narrow, railed flight of five steps, 8 inches 
(20.32 cm) each in height. Visitors in wheelchairs will need assistance to 



New York 117 



enter, since ramps are not feasible, and there is no alternative entry to the 
home. Site personnel should be notified in advance for such assistance. 

Restroom facilities on the first floor are not adequate for visitors in 
wheelchairs. Plans are being considered to renovate the existing facilities 
to provide access and equipment. The second floor is reached by 20 
7-1/2 inch (19.05 cm) steps. 

Guided tours are given hourly, weekdays 9 to 5 and weekends 1 2 to 
5 except on Federal holidays. Buses from downtown Buffalo stop in 
front of the site. 



Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site 

Hyde Park, Dutchess County, New York 12538 

(914)229-9115 

Fine example of a palatial mansion built by 19th-century financiers. 

It is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is equipped with restrooms and easily accessible. On 
request, assistance will be provided up twelve 8-mch (20.32 cm) en- 
trance steps to the mansion. "Ecoust-a-guides" (cassettes with ear- 
phones) are provided for audio tours. Magnificent grounds with scenic 
view of the Hudson River have straight paved paths for each access. 



118 North Carolina 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Blue Ridge Parkway 

700 Northwestern Bank Building 
Woodfin Street 

Asheville, North Carolina 28801 
(704)258-2850x0718 

Following the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, this scenic parkway 
averages 3,000 feet (913.5 m) above sea level. It embraces several large 
recreational areas and preserves mountain folk culture. Construction of 
469 miles (755. 09 km) of the planned 659-mile (1, 060 99 km) parkway is 
completed. This is a "Living History" area m Virginia and North Caro- 
lina. 

The parkway offers enjoyable day-use trips. Maps and printed material 
are available at each end of the parkway and at various visitor centers 
along the way. Interpretive signs can be viewed from the car. Most of 
the 230 overlooks are accessible without leaving the car. The parkway's 
overlooks include such views as the James River and its canal locks 
(Va.), the Peaks of Otter (Va.), Mabry Mill (Va.), and Grandfather Moun- 
tain, Mount Mitchell and the Craggy Gardens wild rhododendron field 
(N.C.). Mount Mitchell State Park can be reached by a drive off the 
parkway. 

The Roanoke Mountain Campground for Handicapped Visitors (near 
Milepost 120) has three compsites, comfort station and a nature trail. 
All facilities are fully accessible with drinking fountains, hard-surfaced 
paths, raise bars and tilted mirrors in the restrooms and picnic tables 
at the right height. 

Accessible restaurants are at Mabry Mill (Milepost 176.1) and at 
Peaks of Otter (Milepost 84). No lodgings are accessible on the parkway 
without assistance. Accessible lodgings will be found in urban centers 
off the parkway relatively short distances, such as Roanoke and Waynes- 
boro (Va.) and Asheville and the Boone-Blowmg Rock area (N.C.). 

The following service centers are accessible: the James River visitor 
center (a small, generally unmanned, open exhibit shelter); the Peaks 
of Otter camp store and gift shop; the Bluffs Coffee Shop and photo and 
craft shop (N.C.); Crabtree Meadows Coffee and Gift Shops and camp 
store (N.C.); and the Craggy Gardens visitor center (a one-room en- 
closed shelter with plant exhibits). 

Evening campfire talks are given in the summer at Otter Creek, 
Peaks of Otter, and Rocky Knob (Va.), Doughton Park, Julian Price 
Memorial Park, Crabtree Meadows and Mount Pisgah (N.C.). Several 
accessible nature walks and self -guiding trails are along the way. The 
following trails, however, are very strenuous: Humpback Rocks, Flat 
Top Mountain, Sharp Top Mountain, Harkening Hill, Elk Run, Rocky 
Knob, Cascades, Green Knob, Flat Rock Craggy Gardens, Waterrock 



North Carolina 119 



Knob and Devils Courthouse. These trails should be checked before the 
trip is attempted. 

The several craft centers along the parkway include Mabry Mill at 
Milepost 176.1 with a self -guiding trail featuring old-time mountain 
industry, a water-powered mill and a blacksmith shop in operation; 
Moses H. Cone Memorial Park at Milepost 292.7 with 25 miles (40.25 km) 
of horse and carriage trails, two lakes and the Parkway Craft Center 
(Mile 294); Brinnegar Cabin (Mile 238.5) offering demonstrations of 
weaving on an old mountain loom (access difficult from parking area 
because of rather steep path, rugged terrain and some steps). At the 
Museum of North Carolina Minerals, at Milepost 331, near Spruce Pine, 
N.C., ramps cross the parking area curb and the step to the porch to 
the exhibit area. Construction of a 200-foot (60.9 m) "mineral" exhibit 
trail is underway. 

Construction has begun on the Southern Highland Folk Art Center 
at Milepost 387 near Asheville, off U.S. 70 at Oteen. The center will 
serve to preserve and perpetuate the craft and music traditions of the 
Appalachian mountain region through its proposed educational, recrea- 
tional and training programs. Anticipated completion date is summer, 
1979. 



Cape Hatteras National Seashore 

Route 1, Box 675 
Manteo, North Carolina 27954 
(919)473-2113 

Beaches, migratory waterfowl, fishing and points of historical interest, 
including the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse overlooking the "graveyard of 
the Atlantic, " are special features of Cape Hatteras, the first national sea- 
shore. This is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center, at the park entrance, is at the intersection of U.S. 158 
and N.C. 12, due south of Nags Head, southeast of Manteo. The center 
is an historic structure. This fact and the safety hazard make ramps over 
the two entry steps infeasible. Assistance over the steps is available for 
visitors in wheelchairs. The restrooms are inadequate. 

The Museum of the Sea at Buxton and the visitor center at Bodie 
Island are accessible with some assistance over small steps. The protected 
Coquina Beach on Bodie Island has boardwalks from the parking areas 
to the beach, but they end some distance from the water. The bathing 
facility is accessible by ramps. Visitors can enjoy picnicking, sunning 
and ocean viewing, just off the boardwalks, which are close to many 
picnic tables. Recently constructed restroom facilities accommodate 
visitors in wheelchairs. 

Good ocean-viewing points are also on Oregon Inlet Bridge, 3 miles 
(4.83 km) in length, and at the Cape Hatteras and Bodie Island light- 
houses. The Cape Hatteras lighthouse is the only lighthouse in the area 
open to the public, but the climb is up steep, spiraled steps. Fishing 



1 20 North Carolina 



may be enjoyed at the concessioner-operated piers at Rodanthe, Avon, 
and Frisco, all reached by long vehicular ramps from the parking areas. 



Cape Lookout National Seashore 

PO. Box 690, 415 Front Street 

Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 

(919)728-2121 

This series of undeveloped barrier islands stretches 58 miles southwest 

(93.38 km) from Ocracoke Inlet and Portsmouth Village. The islands 

contain beaches, dunes, salt marshes and important landmarks in early 

coastal trade. They extend to Beaufort Inlet and Shackleford Banks, 

where a classic maritime forest resists the harsh elements. The park 

includes Cape Lookout and its famous lighthouse, built in 1859 to warn 

sailors of the dangerous Lookout Shoals. 

The park is in the planning, development and acquisition stage and 
there are no public buildings or sanitary facilities at this time. The sea- 
shore is accessible only by boat and there are no roads on the islands. 
Docking facilities for the concession ferry boats are unsuitable for visitors 
with mobility handicaps, and there are no paved paths or boardwalks 
on the sandy barrier islands. The lighthouse is not open to visitors. 

Park headquarters, on U.S. 70, 5 miles (8.05 km) east of Beaufort, 
provides general information on the area. An administrative office in 
temporary quarters on Harkers Island, 2 miles (3.22 km) east of Beaufort 
on U.S. 70, also has pamphlets and other types of information about the 
natural features and history of the area. In the planning stage are an 
aquarium, a slide show and a nature trail. 



Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 395 

Flat Rock, North Carolina 28731 

(704)693-4178 

"Connemara" was the farm home of the noted poet-author for the last 

22 years of his life. During his residence here, several of his books were 

published. The site includes the 20-room, three-story farmhouse and 

several out-buildings, Sandburg's goat herd and other farm animals. 

This is a "Living Historical Farm " area. 

The farm is on Little River Road, close to the intersection with U.S. 25, 
26 miles (41.86 km) south of Asheville. The shuttlebuses which transport 
visitors to the site, are not equipped to handle visitors with wheelchairs. 
These visitors should call park headquarters from the Flat Rock Play- 
house at the intersection of U.S. 25 and Little River Road to request 
permission to drive through the grounds by an alternate route. 

The entrance to the information center in the basement is at ground 
level. The large restroom on this level has an entry door 24 inches (60.96 



North Carolina 1 2 1 



cm) wide. The two upper floors of the farmhouse are reached by two 
flights of steep stairs. Between the farmyard and the barnyard is a 300- 
yard (274.32 m) hard-packed gravel driveway. 

The nearest full range of medical services, accessible restaurants 
and lodging are at Hendersonville, 3 miles (4.83 km) north of Flat Rock 
on U.S. 25. 



Fort Raleigh National Historic Site 

c/o Cape Hatteras National Seashore 

P.O. Box 457 

Manteo, North Carolina 27954 

(919)473-2116 

The first English settlement m North America was attempted here (1585- 

87), and the fate of Sir Walter Raleigh 's "Lost Colony" remains a mystery. 

The site is at the north end of Roanoke Island, north of Manteo, on U.S. 
64. The visitor center is accessible by ramp from the parking area, but 
assistance will be needed to enter the building from the porch over a 
5-inch (12 7 cm) step unsuitable for a ramp. The restrooms are inade- 
quate (stall doors are 22 1/2 inches [57.15 cm] wide) and assistance is 
needed over a 5-mch (12.7 cm) step. 

A paved ramp to the waterside theater entrance provides access to 
performances of "The Lost Colony," (summer only) and there is ample 
space for seating in the front of the amphitheater. All trails, with the ex- 
ception of the Hanot Nature Trail, are level and easily traveled. Exhibits, 
audiovisual and interpretive programs in the visitor center auditorium 
are all accessible. 



Great Smoky Mountains National Park 

(See Tennessee) 



Guilford Courthouse National Military Park 

P.O. Box 9806, Plaza Station 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27408 

(919)288-1776 

77?e battle fought here on March 15, 1781, opened the campaign which 

led to Yorktown and the end of the Revolution. This is a "Living History" 

area 

The visitor center is located at the intersection of New Garden Road and 
Old Battleground Road, just outside the city limits of Greensboro. The 
visitor center is entered at ground level and the restrooms are fully 
accessible and equipped. 

The road around the perimeter of the park is self-guiding with the 



122 North Carolina 



aid of printed materials and pushbutton audiovisual messages. Part of 
the historical trail is easily negotiable, but some sections are of loose 
gravel. 

Audiovisual programs, interpretive talks and living history demon- 
strations are offered in and near the visitor center. 



Moores Creek National Military Park 

P.O. Box 69 

Currie, North Carolina 28435 
(919)283-5591 

The brief but violent battle on Feb. 27, 1776, between North Carolina 
Patriots and Loyalists, is commemorated here. The Patriot victory notably- 
advanced the revolutionary cause m the South, ending Royal authority 
in the colony This helped forestall a British invasion of the South and 
encouraged North Carolina on April 1, 1776, to instruct its delegation 
to the Continental Congress to support total independence — the first 
colony to so act. 

The 42-acre (16.96 ha.) park is in southeastern North Carolina 1 mile 
(1.61 km) from Currie on NC 210, 3 miles (4.83 km) west of U.S. 421, 
20 miles (32.2 km) northeast of Wilmington by NC 2 10 and U.S. 42 1 . The 
visitor center is fully accessible by ramp from the parking area and, from 
the rear of the building, ramps lead directly to the hard-surfaced 1/2- 
mile (0.805 km) loop History Trail. Exhibits and an orientation audio- 
visual program are in the visitor center. The comfort stations outside the 
visitor center are portable, fully accessible restrooms. 

The History Trail is hard-surfaced to the historic area, but within 
that area the trails are of loose surface sand which may present diffi- 
culties for some visitors. Also difficult may be the return route of the 
History Trail over Slocum Hill at an 8 percent grade. Assistance is avail- 
able in each instance. Benches are on hand for resting. Visitors in wheel- 
chairs may drive to the picnic area and directly to the door of Patriots 
Hall. In the picnic area, the nearest parking spaces are within 5 to 10 
feet ( 1 .52 to 3.04 m) of picnic tables. 

Interpretive programs are given at Patriots Hall. Living history 
demonstrations are given in the historic battlefield area. Special inter- 
pretive programs and conducted tours for groups are available by 
advance arrangement. 

Accessible restaurants and lodging, and a full range of medical 
services are available in Wilmington. 



North Carolina 123 



Wright Brothers National Memorial 

c/o Cape Hatteras National Seashore 

P.O. Box 457 

Manteo, North Carolina 27954 

(919)441-7430 

The first sustained flight in a heavier-than-air machine was made here by 

Wilbur and Orville Wright on December 17, 1903. This is a "Living 

History" area. 

The visitor center is 18 miles (28.97 km) northeast of Manteo on U.S. 
158, and is accessible by means of an entrance ramp. Restrooms are 
outside the visitor center. Entry doors are 36 inches (9 1 .44 cm) wide and 
stall doors are 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. 

Oral history programs are given by park interpreters at regular 
intervals throughout the day. Kite building and kite flying programs are 
offered and a living history program, "Dialogue with Orville Wright," 
and exhibits in the visitor center will interest many visitors. The Wright 
Brothers memorial shaft is not open to the public. 



124 North Dakota 



Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site N D Mont 
c/o Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park 
Medora, North Dakota 58645 
(701)623-4466 

The trading post that stood here was the principal fur-trading depot m 
the Upper Missouri River region from 1829 to 1867. Only the founda- 
tions remain today. Federal acreage is 74.09 in North Dakota and 47 
in Montana. 

The site is to be excavated and part of the stockade will be restored. 
There are no Federal facilities at this time. An unpaved trail runs through 
the area. The site is 25 miles (40.23 km) southwest of Williston at deadend 
of State Highway 477, 8 miles (12.88 km) north of interchange on 1-25. 
Food, lodging and medical services are available at Williston. 



International Peace Garden 

P.O. Box 419 

Dunseith, North Dakota 58637 
(701)263-4390 

Peaceful relations between Canada and the United States are commem- 
orated here. North Dakota holds the 888-acre (358.75 ha) portion for 
International Peace Garden, Inc., which administers the area for North 
Dakota and Manitoba. The National Park Service has assisted in the 
master plan. Thesiteisan Affiliated Area. 

The area is located on Lake Metigoshe, off U.S. 281. 



Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park 

Medora, North Dakota 58645 

(701)623-4466 

The park contains scenic badlands along the Little Missouri River and 

part of Theodore Roosevelt's Elkhorn Ranch, including bison and some 

of the original prairie. 

The South Unit visitor center is in Medora; the ranger station at the North 
Unit is 17 miles (27.37 km) east, and 50 miles (80.5 km) north of Medora 
on U.S. 85, 17 miles (27.37 km) south of Watford City. Both visitor center 
and ranger station are accessible. Restroom entry doors in the visitor 
center are 32 inches (81.28 km) wide and stall doors 30 inches (76.20 
cm) wide. The Maltese Cross Cabin (the original cabin), directly behind 
the visitor center, is accessible to 27-inch (68.58 cm) wide wheelchairs. 
Two campgrounds, two picnic areas and 12 scenic overlooks along 
the 50 miles (80.47 km) of auto tour roads are accessible. The camp- 
ground at North Unit has newly constructed restrooms designed to 
accommodate wheelchairs. 



North Dakota 125 



Audiovisual programs are offered at the visitor center. Interpretive 
talks and campfire programs are held at both campgrounds. The nature 
trails are all steep and over rugged terrain. 

Food and lodging are available at Medora. The nearest full range 
of medical service for the South Unit is at Dickinson, 35 miles (56.35 km) 
east on U.S. 94, or at Beach, 25 miles (40.25 km) west on U.S. 94. Food, 
lodging and medical facilities are available at Watford City. 



126 Ohio 



Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area 

P.O.Box 158 

Peninsula, Ohio 44264 

(216)653-9036 

This recreation area links the urban centers of Cleveland and Akron, 

preserving the rural character of the Cuyahoga River valley, and such 

historic resources as the century-old Ohio Canal system. 

No Federally-operated facilities exist at this time. However, planning and 
development are well underway. Recreational opportunities will range 
from hiking and picnicking to interpretive programs with an emphasis 
on the environment. The park headquarters should be contacted about 
the future development and timetable of construction. 



Mound City Group National Monument 

Route l,Box 1 

Chillicothe, Ohio 4560 1 

(614)774-1125 

Two thousand years ago (300 B.C-600 A.D.), the Ohio River Valley 

was the focal point of the Hopewell fndian culture. The Hopewell 

Indians created some of the finest prehistoric art in North America, built 

vast geometrical earth works and constructed burial mounds. The largest 

known concentration of these mounds is preserved at this monument. 

The burial mounds yield copper breastplates, tools, obsidian blades, 

shells, ornaments of grizzly bear teeth and stone pipes carved as birds 

and animals. 

The monument is located 3 miles (4.83 km) north of Chillicothe, Ohio, 
on State Route 104, and can be reached by automobile or bus. A sec- 
tion of the parking lot curb has a ramp and the 100-foot (30.48 m) long 
walkway from the parking lot to the visitor center is level and paved. 
The visitor center doors are 33 inches (83.80 cm) wide, level with the 
entry walk and non-automated. Restrooms have 33-inch (83.80 cm) 
wide doors and the unequipped stalls 22-inch (55.88 cm) doors. Stairs 
with handrails lead to the observation deck on the visitor center roof. 

The entire park is on nearly the same level, with the exception of 
the trail along the Scioto River, which is reached by a stairway with hand- 
rails. A paved trail with a slight gradient leads from the visitor center to a 
wayside exhibit at the Mica Grave. The remainder of the trail system is 
grass-covered. There is a small picnic area on level ground and a self- 
guidmg interpretive trail. Several rest benches occupy quiet, shady 
places throughout the park. 

The interpretive facilities include three tape repeaters and seven, 
three-dimensional signs with 1/2-mch lettering. The interpretive tape 
recording on the observation deck of the visitor center is audible from 
the patio below. Interpretive programs for special groups may be 
arranged in advance. 



Ohio 1 27 



Restaurants, lodging, pharmacies and other facilities are available in 
Chillicothe. The Ross County Medical Center is approximately 8 miles 
(12.88 km) from the park. 



Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial 

Put-in-Bay, Ohio 43456 

(419)285-2184 

Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry won the greatest naval battle of the 

War of 1812 on Lake Erie. The Memorial, a massive Doric column, 

was constructed in 1912-15 to commemorate the victory, to memorialize 

international peace as exemplified by the unfortified Canadian border, 

and "to inculcate the lessons of international peace by arbitration and 

disarmament". 

The Memorial is on South Bass Island in the village of Put-in-Bay. The 
island is 4 miles (6.44 km) from Catawba, Ohio and 14 miles (22 54 km) 
from Port Clinton, Ohio. Ferry boats from both Catawba and Port 
Clinton to Put-m-Bay operate from mid-April to mid-November. Air- 
planes provide passenger service year round. The Memorial is closed 
from the end of October to the middle of April. 

The observation platform at the top of the Memorial is reached by 
an elevator and a series of stairs having approximately 50 steps. Inside 
stairs have handrails. The Memorial grounds are flat lawn and a few 
paved walks. Interpretive programs are presented several times each 
day during the summer. Special arrangements may be made for inter- 
pretive talks at other times by writing or calling the superintendent. 

The visitor information station is accessible to all visitors near the 
entrance to the park. Comfort stations are at ground level at the base of 
the Memorial. Stall doors are 28 inches (7112 cm) wide and handgrips 
are provided in one stall in both restrooms. Visitors requiring emergency 
medical attention must be taken to the mainland by boat or airplane 



William Howard Taft National Historic Site 

2038 Auburn Avenue 

Cincinnati, Ohio 452 19 

(513)684-3262 

This house was the birthplace and boyhood home of William Howard 

Taft, the only man to serve as both President and Chief Justice of the 

United States. He was the 27th President from 1909-13 and U.S. Chief 

Justice from 1921-30. 

The home is undergoing restoration, but a small exhibit room on the 
south side of the house is open to visitors Access is a concrete service 
driveway from the moderately-graded Auburn Avenue. Four steps lead 
from the driveway to the exhibit room Limited parking is on Auburn 
Avenue and other nearby streets. 

No special facilities are available at this time. 



128 Oklahoma 



Chickasaw National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 201 

Sulphur, Oklahoma 73086 

(405)622-3161 

Piatt National Park, authorized in 1906, was combined with Arbuckle 

National Recreation Area lands by Act of March 17, 1976, to form 

Chickasaw National Recreation Area, as "a fitting memonalization of the 

Chickasaw Indian Nation. " The area has numerous cold mineral water 

and freshwater springs, clear streams in wooded valleys and stretches of 

hillside prairies. The area surrounds the manmade Lake of the Arbuckles. 

An unloading area and wheelchair ramp are 115 feet (35.03 m) from 
the entrance to the Travertine Nature Center, a temporary visitor center. 
Special parking spaces are posted for use of handicapped visitors, 
225 feet (68.54 m) from the entrance. Restrooms in the nature center 
have one stall each with wide, outward-opening doors and wall-mounted 
assist bars. 

All scenic overlooks except Bromide Hill are accessible from a 
motor car. Some trails are wide and level enough to accommodate 
wheelchairs. Most trails are without handrails. Many walks are level, 
shaded and short. Picnic and camping facilities are close to parking 
and most can be reached by trails of less than 100 feet (30.45 m), 
generally without steps. Visitors are advised to inquire at the nature 
center or at the ranger stations for assistance or information on acces- 
sible points of interest. Special interpretive programs are available for 
groups by advance arrangement. Many of the exhibits at the nature 
center may be touched. 

Restaurants, lodging and medical services are available at Sulphur, 
1-1/2 miles (2.41 km) west on Highway 177, at the border of the park. 



Fort Smith National Historic Site 

(See Arkansas) 



Oregon 129 



Crater Lake National Park 

Box 7 

Crater Lake, Oregon 97604 

(503)594-2211 

This park's deep blue lake lies in the heart of Mount Mazama, an ancient 

volcanic peak that collapsed centuries ago. The lake is encircled by 

multicolored lava walls reaching 500 to 2,000 feet (152.4 to 609.6 m) 

above the lake waters. 

The 250 square-mile (402.5 sq. km) park has elevations ranging from 
4,405 feet (1,339.12 m) at the south entrance to the 8,926 feet (2,720,64 
m) of Mt. Scott. Hillman Peak at 8,156 feet (2,479.42 m) is the highest 
point of the one-way 33-mile (53.13 km) Rim Drive around the crater, 
and Rim Village is at a 7,100 foot (2,158.4 m) altitude. U.S. 62 runs 
through the park from south to west entrances, the only entrances open 
year-round. 

The headquarters and visitor center are 3 miles (4.83 km) below the 
Rim. Rim Village is the hub of activity around the crater. The exhibit 
building and the Simnot Memorial Building, where interpretive talks are 
given, are on the Rim, and open only in the summer. Crater Lake Lodge 
and the cafeteria building have accessible facilities. At the Lodge, visi- 
tors in wheelchairs enter at the rear at ground level, or at the front en- 
trance, with always-available assistance over the few steps into the build- 
ing. Restrooms on the main floor have entry doors of 33 inches (83.80 
cm) width and stall doors 30 inches (76.20 cm) wide. A few guestrooms 
are available on the mam floor of the Lodge, and the dining room is also 
on the main floor. The Lodge is open from June 15 to September 15. 
Reservations for the accessible guestrooms in the Lodge should be 
made with Crater Lake Lodge, Inc., Crater Lake, Oregon 97604, (503) 
594-2511. 

The cafeteria building, with dining room, curio shop, restrooms and 
cafeteria, is open all year. The building is fully accessible from the nearby 
parking area. From June 15 to September 15, the restrooms on the mam 
level are reached by movable ramps. Entry doors are 34 inches (86.36 
cm) wide and stall doors are 28 inches (78. 12 cm) wide. Restrooms with 
the same dimensions are accessible year-round on a lower level. 

The park's main features can be seen by car from the many over- 
looks. Visitors also can enjoy the level walk along the Crater Rim. Amphi- 
theater programs are accessible, but conducted trips and self-guiding 
paths are largely over terrain of wilderness condition. Interpretive talks 
are given nightly from June 1 5 to Labor Day on the geology and history 
of formation of the area in the Mazama campground, 6 miles (9.66 km) 
from the Lodge. The campground is accessible by automobile and as- 
phalt path. The Lost Creek campground is accessible, but has only out- 
side pit or chemical toilets. The Gray Back motor nature trail begins at 
Lost Creek and runs to Vidae Fall 

The nearest full range of medical services and accessible restaurants 
and lodgings, year-round, are at Medford, 69 miles (1 1 1.09 km) from 
the west entrance on Oregon 62, or Klamath Falls, 54 miles (86.94 km) 
from the south entrance on Oregon 62 and U.S. 97. 



1 30 Oregon 



Fort Clatsop National Memorial 

Route 3, Box 604-FC 

Astoria, Oregon 97103 

(503)861-2471 

The Lewis and Clark Expedition camped here m the winter of 1805-6. 

This is a "Living History" area. 

The headquarters and visitor center are 6 miles (9.66 km) southwest of 
Astoria, on U.S. 101. The visitor center is fully accessible at ground level. 
Equipped restrooms also are fully accessible at ground level. 

During the summer season living history programs are presented. 
Throughout the year, a 20-minute slide program is given in the visitor 
center and the exhibit room is open. The canoe landing trail is of chipped 
bark and moderately sloped. Concrete trails lead around the fort. Within 
the fort the trails are of easily negotiable chipped bark. 

Restaurants, accessible lodgings and a full range of medical facili- 
ties are in Astoria. 



John Day Fossil Beds National Monument 

420 West Mam Street 

John Day, Oregon 97845 

(503)575-0721 

Plant and animal fossils here show five epochs, from the Eocene to the 

end of the Pleistocene. 

Monument headquarters and one of two visitor contact stations are in 
John Day. The visitor center is fully accessible from the street and rest- 
rooms have been designed to accommodate wheelchairs. Exhibits and 
informal interpretive talks are available. The monument comprises three 
separate units, one each near Dayville and Mitchell, both on U.S. 26, and 
the third near Fossil, north of Mitchell. A second visitor contact station 
has been provided in the Sheep Rock unit near Dayville. The station is 
an old, converted ranchhouse which has been made fully accessible, 
including the restrooms. There are no facilities for visitors at the more 
distant units. 

Food, lodging and medical facilities are available in John Day. 



McLoughlin House National Historic Site 

McLoughlin Park between 7th and 8th (4 blocks East of Pacific Highway) 
Oregon City, Oregon 97045 
(503)656-5146 

Dr. John McLoughlin, often called the "Father of Oregon, " was promi- 
nent in the development of the Pacific Northwest as chief factor of Fort 
Vancouver. He lived in this house from 1847 to 1857. This is an Affiliated 
Area. 



Oregon 1 3 1 



Two shallow steps lead to the front entry. There are no public restrooms. 
Exhibits, descriptive plaques and informal talks by volunteers interpret 
for visitors. The second floor is reached by a long stairway. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Oregon City. 



Oregon Caves National Monument 

P.O. Box 649 

Cave Junction, Oregon 97523 

(503) (Ask operator for Oregon Caves Toll Station #2 through Medford, 

Oregon.) 

Surface water running through marble bedrock formed these cave 

passages and intricate flowerstone formations. 

The monument is 20 miles southeast of Cave Junction on State Route 46. 
A ranger station, parking lot and information booth are at the park 
entrance. Visitors then drive 1/10 mile (.161 km) to the Chateau, the 
Oregon Caves lodge, adjacent to the cave entrance. Campfire programs 
are held nightly in the fully accessible campfire circle outside the Chateau. 
The Caves are reached only by ladders and narrow passages, but slides 
and descriptive booklets provide visitors with an idea of the color and 
forms within the caves. 

The Chateau may be entered with assistance over two steps into the 
lobby. A few guestrooms on the lobby floor are accessible to visitors in 
wheelchairs with assistance. The dining room and coffee shop are acces- 
sible from the outside by ramp. Restrooms for women in the Chateau 
restaurant area have two entry doors, successively 34-1/4 inches 
(86.055 cm) wide. In addition, assistance will be required to help visitors 
over two steps at the entry of the women's restrooms. No steps lead to the 
men's restroom here, and there is only one entry door, 27 inches (68.58 
cm) wide, with stall doors 23 1/4 inches (59.055 cm) wide. 

The nearest full range of medical services is available at Grants 
Pass, 50 miles (80.5 km) from the monument by State 46 and U.S. 199. 
Doctors are available in Cave Junction. 



1 32 Pennsylvania 



Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 247 

Cresson, Pennsylvania 16630 

(814)886-8176 

This site preserves structures and traces of the 36-mile (57.93 km) 

incline railroad built between 1831-34 to carry passengers and freight 

over the Allegheny Mountains between canal basins at Holhdaysburg 

and Johnstown. 

The entire area is accessible. Specified parking bays are set aside for 
handicapped visitors at the Lemon House Visitor Center near Cresson. 
Restrooms are accessible. Benches and many quiet spots for resting 
are found along the trails. Staff personnel give interpretive talks and 
demonstrations and provide assistance as needed. 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area 

Bushkill, Pennsylvania 18324 
(717)588-6637 

Kittatmny Point (201) 496-4458; Pocono Environmental Education 
Center (7 17) 828-23 19 

This scenic area preserves relatively unspoiled land on both the New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania sides of the Delaware River. Much of the 
scenery can be viewed from a car. At Kittatmny Point information sta- 
tion (south end of the park, off Interstate 80, Columbia, New Jersey), a 
permanent ramp from the parking area provides access to the station. 
Portable ramps are also available at the station and at other locations. 
In that station, restroom doors are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide outside and 
24 inches (60.96 cm) wide inside. Assistance may be required to cross 
the grassy plots from the parking area to the picnic area. 

The Pocono Environmental Education Center, near Dmgmans 
Ferry, Pa., is equipped with fully accessible restrooms. The center has 
a sensory-perception trail with nylon cord and large printed messages 
for self-guidance or with assistance as needed. Other than the Appa- 
lachian Trail, short trails of hard-packed earth are relatively easy to 
traverse. Ambulance and hospital services are avialable in East Strouds- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 



Pennsylvania 133 



Fort Necessity National Battlefield 

Route 1, Box 360 "The National Pike" 

Farmington, Pennsylvania 15437 

(412)329-5512 

Fort Necessity was the scene of the opening battle of the French and 

Indian War, in which Col. George Washington and his Virginia Colonial 

troops engaged French troops assisted by Indians, July 3, 1754. It is a 

"Li vmg History " area. 

The battlefield is 1 1 miles (17.70 km) east of Uniontown The fort, Mount 
Washington Tavern Museum and the visitor center are within easy access 
of parking areas. Interpretive talks are given at all three locations. There 
is a ramp at the visitor center parking area Double doors provide access 
to the visitor center, restroom access is 28 inches (71.12 cm) wide Visi- 
tors in wheelchairs will need help up the rather steep woodchip trail to 
the tavern and over the two steps into the double-door entrance. 



Gettysburg National Military Park 

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325 

(717)334-1124 

77?e decisive Civil War battle fought here July 1-3, 1863, repulsed the 

second Confederate invasion of the North. It is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center includes the Electric Map orientation program, the 
Cyclorama Center featuring the 356-foot (180.44 m) painting of Pickett's 
Charge, and restrooms. All are fully accessible. Picnic facilities are 
accessible in the park and near the visitor center. 

The walking tour at the Angle, the Virginia Memorial and the North 
Carolina Memorial are all fullv accessible. Portions of the tours to Devil's 
Den and the Eternal Peace Memorial are accessible by wheelchair and 
principal features of these two memorials can be viewed from the acces- 
sible areas. Audiovisual programs, interpretive talks and campfire pro- 
grams are regular features at the park. 

Hospital emergency facilities are one-half mile (0.80 km) away, 
ambulance is on call. The bus depot, with connections to major cities, is 
located 2 miles (3.22 km) from the visitor center. The least crowded times 
to visit are autumn and winter and weekdays at other times of the year. 



Hopewell Village National Historic Site 

R.D. 1, Box 345 

Elverson, Pennsylvania 19520 

(215)582-8773 

One of the finest examples of a rural American 18th and 19th-century 

lronmakmg community, the park includes the blast furnace and its 

auxiliary structures, ft is a "Living History" area. 



1 34 Pennsylvania 



The visitor center is about 5 miles north of Elverson off Route 345 to the 
west. The parking lot has designated spaces and curb cuts where 
needed on the walk to the center. A ramp to the lower level which 
parallels the steps gives access from the outside to restrooms. The 
width of restroom doors is 33 inches (83.82 cm) and of stall doors, 
23 inches (58.42 cm). 

The visitor center is on the top of a hill approximately 100 feet 
(30.48 m) above the village itself. Information as to access and alternate 
means for getting down to the village level may be obtained from the 
visitor center, in addition to assistance when needed. 

The village itself is on level ground with the exception of one small 
rise, but once into the village, all features are easily accessible. The nature 
trail is 1/2-mile-long, but is rough and narrow and lacks handrails. 

Audiovisual programs are offered at the visitor center; interpretive 
recorded talks are at the mam points of interest along the walking tour 
path in the village. Campfire programs are scheduled at the anthracite 
furnace. Many historic objects and buildings may be touched and felt. 



Independence National Historical Park 

3 1 3 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106 
(215)597-7120 

For all visitor information: (215) 597-8975 

The park includes structures and properties in old Philadelphia asso- 
ciated with the American Revolution and the founding and growth of the 
United States. 

The visitor center at Third and Chestnut Streets is fully accessible. All 
restrooms have wide booths and are fully equipped. All floors of the 
visitor center are accessible by ramp. The center's two theaters are 
accessible from ground level. Curb cuts have been made at all corners 
of the downtown park area. Care should be taken on the 18th-century 
brick sidewalks which are sometimes rough and uneven. 

Braille and large-print guides to the park are available at the visitor 
center. Braille pamphlets and maps are available upon request. Taped 
messages are provided in Congress Hall in foreign languages and at the 
Liberty Bell in English. Three relief maps of the park, with buildings 
labeled in Braille, stand in front of the visitor center. Interpretation in each 
of the park-run areas (not the affiliated areas) is by park personnel or by 
taped messages. For information about (and assistance required for) all 
of the following units (including the affiliated areas), calls should be made 
to the visitor center. 

Benjamin Franklin National Memorial 

20th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway; (215) 448-1000 
!n the Rotunda of the Franklin Institute, the colossal seated statue of 
Franklin, by James Earle Fraser, honors the inventor-statesman. 
An Affiliated Area. 



Pennsylvania 1 35 



Visitors in wheelchairs can use the 21st and Winter Streets entrance. 
Elevator service to all floors and access to the Memorial Room can 
be provided (in some cases by portable ramps) if advance notice is 
given. There are three extra-wide restrooms with grab bars. Doors 
are not automatic. Parking lots are within one block and most curbs 
are cut at the corners. Spring and summer are the busy seasons. 
The Memorial is staffed by employees of the Franklin Institute. 

Bishop White House 

Bishop William White, rector of Christ Church and St. Peter's 
Church, and the first Episcopal Bishop of Pennsylvania, built this 
house in 1786-87. He liver here until his death in 1836. 

Admission to Bishop White House is by guided tour only. Tickets 
must be picked up at the visitor center for same-day tour. Portable 
ramps are placed over the entry by the tour guide. Access to the 
second floor is by steep flights of steps separated by a narrow 
landing. 

Carpenters' Hall 

Carpenters' Hall was built m 1770 by the Carpenters Company of 
Philadelphia, which still owns and maintains it. The First Continental 
Congress met here in September 1774. 

Access to the two-story structure is by seven steps at a steep incline. 
There is no alternative entry. 

Christ Church 

Built between 1727 and 1754. Christ Church is a fine example of a 
colonial church. Seven signers of the Declaration of Independence 
(including Benjamin Franklin) are buried in the cemetery and 
churchyard. 

The churchyard and the cemetery (one block away) are fully 
accessible. 

City Tavern 

The "most genteel tavern in America " was once the social center of 
Philadelphia. Banquets and receptions were held here for the 
Continental and Federal Congresses. It has been reconstructed as 
an operating 18th-century tavern. 

The City Tavern is not accessible by wheelchair. All entries are by 
flights of 10 to 12 steep steps. 

Congress Hall 

The Hall was constructed in 1787-89 as the Philadelphia County 
Court House. It served as the meeting place for the Federal Con- 
gress from 1790 to 1800. During the 1 9th century it housed Federal 
and local courts. 



1 36 Pennsylvania 



The first floor is accessible by ramp over the entry steps. Access to 
the second floor is by a steep, tall flight of steps. 

The Deshler-Morris House 

5442 Germantown Avenue 

The Deshler-Morris House was erected m 1772-73 and served as 
the home of President Washington during the summers of 1793 
and 1794. 

There are six steps at the entry of Deshler-Morris House and no 
ramp. Two steep flights of steps and a middle landing lead to the 
upper floor. 

First Bank of the United States 

First Bank, built between 1795 and 1797 as the home of the 
"government's banker, " is probably the oldest bank building in the 
United States. 

There are no exhibits and the site is not open to the public in 1977. 
At the time of opening a ramp will provide access at the rear of the 
building. Information about opening to the public in the future 
should be checked at the visitor center. 

Franklin Court 

77ws is the site of the handsome brick home of Benjamin Franklin, 
who lived here while serving in the Continental Congress, the 
Constitutional Convention and as President of Pennsylvania. He 
died here in 1790. The house was torn down about 20 years later. 

Franklin Court is completely accessible with ramps and elevators to 
the underground complex of exhibits and a motion picture. 

Free Quaker Meeting House 

77ms Meeting House, built in 1783, is the oldest meetinghouse in 
Philadelphia. The Free Quakers, unlike the mam body of Quakers 
which remained pacifist, supported and fought for the American 
cause in the Revolutionary War. 

Four steep steps lead to the entry of Free Quaker Meeting House. 
There is no ramp. 

Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church National Historic Site 

Delaware Avenue and Swanson Street 

Gloria Dei Church was built in 1700 and is the oldest church in 

Pennsylvania. An Affiliated Area. 

A small parking lot is within reasonable distance. Stone and brick 
paved walks wind through the graveyard to the west door of the 



Pennsylvania 1 37 



church which is accessible. Restroom access is impeded by one 
step and stall doors are narrow. The church is not staffed by park 
personnel. 

Graff House 

The original Graff House was built in 1775 by Jacob Graff, Jr., a 
bricklayer From May to July 1776 Thomas Jefferson rented the two 
second-floor rooms and there drafted the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. This house is a reconstruction. 

Graff House is accessible by ramp to the first floor. The second floor 
is reached by a steep and long flight of steps. 

Independence Hall 

Independence Hall was originally constructed between 1732 and 
1756 as the Pennsylvania State House in what was then State House 
Yard, now Independence Square. Until 1799 it served as the meet- 
ing place of the provincial and state governments. The Second 
Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention held their 
sessions here. The Declaration of Independence was first read pub- 
licly here on July 8, 1 776. 

Admittance to Independence Hall is by guided tour only and waiting 
lines are frequently lengthy. Access to the Assembly Room and the 
Pennsylvania Supreme Court room on the first floor is by ramp. The 
two steep flights to the second floor may require assistance by park 
personnel. 

The Liberty Bell 

The Liberty Bell is m its new Pavilion across from Independence 
Hall The Liberty Bell's traditional associations with the events of 
the American Revolution and its prophetic 'Proclaim Liberty" 
inscription have made it the most cherished and revered symbol of 
American freedom, and an emblem of liberty throughout the world. 

The area is fully accessible. 

Library Hall 

Library Hall, built originally for the Library Company of Philadelphia 
in 1 789-90, has been reconstructed and is occupied by the library of 
the American Philosophical Society. 

It is open to use by scholars. The Library Hall is not accessible by 
wheelchair as there are five steps to the entry. 



1 38 Pennsylvania 



Mikveh Israel Cemetery 

Ninth and Spruce Streets 

The cemetery, established in 1738, is the oldest Jewish cemetery in 

the city. Haym Salomon, a financier of the Revolution, is buried here. 

The cemetery is fully accessible. 

New Hall 

New Hall was originally built by the Carpenters' Company in 1790 
and used by the War Department in 1791-92. Now reconstructed, 
it houses the U.S. Marine Corps Memorial Museum. 

New Hall is accessible on the first floor, having low steps covered 
by a ramp. 

Old City Hall 

Old City Hall was built in 1790-91 as the Philadelphia City Hall. 
It was used by the U.S. Supreme Court from 1791 to 1800 and by 
the municipal government and courts during the 1 9th century. 

Access is by portable ramp over steps to the first floor. 

Pemberton House 

This house, once the home of Joseph Pemberton, a Quaker mer- 
chant, has been reconstructed and is now occupied by the Army- 
Navy Museum. 

Pemberton House is an unrestored, two-story, three-level exhibit 
area connected by many steps. It is substantially inaccessible to 
wheelchaired visitors. 

Philadelphia Exchange 

The Exchange was designed by William Strickland and built be- 
tween 1832 and 1834. ft housed the Philadelphia Stock Exchange 
for many years. Only the exterior has been restored. 



The site is not open to the public. 



Philosophical Hall 

The American Philosophical Society, founded by Benjamin Franklin 
in 1743, is the oldest learned society in America. The Society erected 
this building between 1 785 and 1 789 and still occupies it. 



The site is not open to the public. 



Pennsylvania 1 39 



St. George's Church 

235 North Fourth Street 

This is the oldest Methodist Church in the United States and, except 

for the winter of 1777-78, has been m constant use since 1769. 

Park personnel provide only security services. The entry has two 
steps and no ramp. 

St. Joseph's Church 

Established in 1733 as the first Roman Catholic church m Phila- 
delphia, St. Joseph's Church is possibly the only church m the 
United States in which mass has been celebrated continuously for 
more than 200 years. 

At Willings Alley entrance there is one step without a ramp. 

Second Bank of the United States 

This fine example of Greek Revival Architecture was designed by 
William Strickland and built between 1819 and 1824. It houses the 
park s portrait gallery. 

Assistance may be requested from the visitor center to unlock the 
door on the east side of the building, and provide a ramp and 
elevator service for visitors. 

Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial 

As a Polish military engineer serving with the American forces, 
Kosciuszko designed and constructed defense works during the 
Revolution. The fortifications he had built at Saratoga contributed 
significantly to the American victory there in 1777. This house 
served as his Philadelphia residence in 1797-98 during a second 
visit to America. 

There are two steps and no ramp to the entry, and steep steps to 
the second floor. A push button tape and slide show are on the 
second floor. 

Todd House 

Built in 1775, Todd House was occupied from 1791 to 1793 by 
John Todd, Jr., and his wife, Dolley Payne. She later married Presi- 
dent James Madison. 

There is no portable ramp over the two entry steps at Todd House 
and the stairs to the second floor are steep, narrow and winding. 



140 Pennsylvania 



Johnstown Flood National Memorial 

P.O. Box 247 

Cresson, Pennsylvania 16630 

(814)886-8176 

Remnants of the earthen South Fork Dam on the Little Conemaugh 

River, which burst on May 31, 1889, causing the devastating flood of 

Johnstown and nearby communities, are preserved here. 

The abutment is located 1,500 feet (456.90 m) from the parking area 
which has specified parking bays. The abutment is reached by a level, 
woodchipped trail, which has several quiet spots for resting. Benches 
along the abutment enable visitors to view the former reservoir site. The 
picnic area is accessible by car. 

Several steep steps with nghthand handrails lead down to the visitor 
center. The only restrooms are portable, chemical types. Uniformed staff 
are available for needed assistance and give interpretive talks. On-site 
first aid is available. 

The area is 10 miles (16.09 km) northeast of Johnstown, near St. 
Michael, Pa. The park is open daily during the summer (May 1 —Octo- 
ber 1 ) and on weekends only during the balance of the year. 



Valley Forge National Historical Park 

Valley Forge, Pennsylvania 1 948 1 
(215)783-7700 

Commemorated here is the site where George Washington's Conti- 
nental Army encamped m the bitter winter of 1777-78 during the 
Revolutionary War. 

The area was officially transferred from the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania to the National Park Service March 30, 1977, but state park 
officials are continuing with completion of a committed $10 million Bi- 
centennial construction program. The program includes a contemporary 
museum building, parking lots, trails and other visitor facilities, and 
restoration of several historic buildings. Until completion of the state 
program, an estimated three years, National Park Service will administer 
the park but will undertake no construction program. 

The present facilities include a visitor center at the intersection of routes 
23 and 363, 2 miles (3.22 km) northwest of Pennsylvania Turnpike 
Exit 24. The park has several miles of easily accessible paved trails, 
leading to nearly all of the park's major historical features. Picnic tables 
are located in several areas of the park and are available on a first-come, 
first-served basis. There are several major parking areas. Their locations 
and other information may be obtained at the visitor center. Bus tours 
and auto-tapes are available from the center. An interpretive film is 
shown frequently in the auditorium. Restroom doors are 34 inches 
(86.36 cm) wide and stall doors, 23 inches (58.42 cm) average. 



Puerto Rico 141 



San Juan National Historic Site 

PO. Box 712 

Old San Juan, Puerto Rico 00902 

(809)724-1974 

These massive masonry fortifications, oldest in the territorial limits of the 

United States, were begun by the Spanish in the 16th century to protect 

a strategic harbor guarding the sea lanes to the New World. 

The site's information desk and other visitor services, including rest- 
rooms, drinking fountains, exhibits and audiovisual programs, are on 
the entry plaza level, the fifth level, of El Morro Castle. A portable ramp 
can be placed over the one entry step. The fifth and sixth levels are con- 
nected by a ramp, but the lower four levels are reached only by narrow 
flights of steps. Restroom entry doors are 30 inches (76.20 cm) wide. The 
stall doors are wider than the entry doors and the stalls are equipped 
with grab bars. Three levels in San Cristobal have ramps for access at 
grades ranging from 8 to 15 percent. Assistance will be necessary on 
the steeper grades. 

Park guides have been trained to lead tours of visitor groups with 
visual handicaps. The guides speak both English and Spanish. A Span- 
ish language folder has been prepared in Braille. The park also provides 
souvenir pictures and an audiovisual program showing the areas in 
the castles inaccessible to some visitors. 



142 Rhode Island 



Roger Williams National Memorial 

P.O. Box 367 Annex Station 

Canal and North Main Streets (at corner of Smith Street) 

Providence, Rhode Island 0290 1 

(401)838-4881 

The national memorial commemorates the establishment of the Rhode 

Island colony and Roger Williams, its founder. 

The small formal garden is completely open. There is no building at the 
site. Visitors coming to the new park will find it undeveloped, the major 
attraction being the garden. A series of steep steps leads into the area. 



Touro Synagogue National Historic Site 

85 Touro Street 

Newport, Rhode Island 02840 

(401)489-4623 

Oldest existing synagogue m the United States and one of the finest 

examples of colonial religious architecture. Place of worship of the 

present Congregation Jeshuat Israel, Newport. An Affiliated Area. 

Some visitors will need help over four steps at the entrance. Assistance 
and guided tours are provided from late June until Labor Day by volun- 
teers at the synagogue. No National Park Service personnel are assigned 
to the area. 



South Carolina 143 



Congaree Swamp National Monument 

c/o Southeast Regional Office 
National Park Service 
1895 Phoenix Boulevard 
Atlanta, Georgia 30349 
(404) 996-2520 

Located on an alluvial flood plain 20 miles (32.2 km) southeast of Colum- 
bia, S.C, the 1 5,000-acre hardwood forest contains record-sized speci- 
mens of cypress trees, water tupelo, black gum, willow oak and loblolly 
pine. 

This new park area was authorized by an Act of Congress on Oct. 18, 
1976. Currently, there are no federal facilities. 



Cowpens National Battlefield Site 

c/o Kings Mountain National Military Park 

R.R. 2, Box 229 

Blacksburg, South Carolina 29702 

(803) 936-7508 

Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan won a decisive Revolutionary War victory 

here over British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton on Jan. 17, 1781. 

The site is 15 miles (24.15 km) northeast of Spartanburg, S.C., off 1-85, 
and 2 miles (3.22 km) southeast of Chesnee, S.C. on S.C. 110. 

A small parking lot is at the intersection of South Carolina Highways 
1 1 and 1 10, which both pass through the area. In the parking area are a 
monument, two markers and a pushbutton audio program. The area is 
accessible to all visitors. 



Fort Sumter National Monument and Fort Moultrie 

Drawer R 

Sullivans Island, South Carolina 29482 
(803)883-3123 

Fort Sumter, near Charleston, S.C, was the scene of the first engage- 
ment of the Civil War on April 12, 1861. The park also administers Fort 
Moultrie, where a decisive encounter of the Revolution occurred on 
June 28, 1776. Seminole Chief Osceola is buried at Fort Moultrie, which 
served as an active fort through World War If. Both forts are "Living 
History" areas. 

The Fort Moultrie visitor center is on West Middle Street on Sullivans 
Island, off U.S. 17 and S.C. 703. Opened in 1976, the center was de- 
signed to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. All facilities, programs 
and events, including the museum, are fully accessible, but parts of the 
fort are accessible only by steps. Interpretive trails are surfaced by hard- 
packed oyster shells. A 15-minute slide program depicts the three phases 



144 South Carolina 



of the fort's history. Park headquarters for both Forts Sumter and 
Moultrie is at the visitor center. 

Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, can be reached only by boat. 
Tours of the fort are conducted daily and weekends by park interpreters. 
Tour boats leave from the foot of Calhoun Street on Lockwood Drive, 
just south of U.S. 1 7 in Charleston. 

Fort Sumter's parade grounds and its ground level are accessible 
to visitors in wheelchairs, but restrooms are on a mezzanine floor, up a 
steep flight of stairs. 

Embarking and disembarking from the tour boat may also present 
problems, because of steep gangplanks and other boat features. For 
boat schedules and other boat information, contact Fort Sumter Tours 
at (803) 722- 1 69 1 , or write Box 59, Charleston, S.C. 29402. 



Kings Mountain National Military Park 

R. R. 2, Box 229 

Blacksburg, South Carolina 29702 

(803) 936-7508 

American frontiersmen defeated the British here on Oct. 7, 1780, at a 

critical point during the Revolution. This is a "Living History" area. 

Kings Mountain is located on South Carolina Highway 216, off 1-85, 
about 10 miles (16.1 km) from the town of Kings Mountain, N.C., and 15 
miles southwest of Gastonia, N.C., and northeast of Gaffney, S.C. 

The parking lot has several designated spaces. It is 75 yards (68.58 
m) from the lobby, auditorium and program room in the visitor center. 
All doors are wide, and restrooms are fully accessible with one stall in 
each restroom equipped with handrails and easily handled doors. 

A film is presented in the theater which is fully accessible with desig- 
nated spaces. The park offers audiovisual programs, living history 
demonstrations, exhibits and a relief map. Some of the exhibits and the 
relief map can be touched. Interpretive programs are also offered in 
the amphitheater. 

The battlefield trail is paved, but it is over rolling terrain and visitors 
in wheelchairs should have assistance in the steep areas. A handrail is 
provided on the steepest part of the trail. 

A full range of medical services, restaurants and lodging is available 
in Gastonia. 



South Carolina 145 



Ninety Six National Historic Site 

Ninety Six, South Carolina 29666 
(803) 543-4068 

This is the site of an 18th-century frontier settlement that was actively 
engaged in the Cherokee fur trade, the French and Indian War and the 
colonization of the Carolina backcountry. It was also a significant military 
post during the Revolutionary War— scene of a November, 1775 Whig- 
Tory engagement and a month-long siege by the Continental Army m 
late spring, 1781. 

The temporary visitor contact station of this new national park area is 2 
miles (3.22 km) south of Ninety Six off U.S. 178 in Greenwood County. 
The station, a log cabin, is located 100 feet (30.48 m) from the unob- 
structed parking area, but three steps make the structure difficult to 
enter without assistance. The restrooms are portable toilets with steps, 
5 inches (12.7 cm) high and doors 23 inches (58.42 cm) wide. The 1-mile 
(1.61 km) loose gravel interpretive trail presents difficulties, especially in 
hot, humid summer months. 

A medical clinic is located in Ninety Six, but the nearest full range of 
medical services, and accessible restaurants and lodging will be found 
in Greenwood, 10 miles to the west. 



146 South Dakota 



Badlands National Monument 

P.O. Box 72 

Interior, South Dakota 57750 
(605)433-5361 

Carved by erosion, this scenic landscape contains animal fossils of 40 
million years ago m the layered, sedimentary deposits. Prairie grass- 
lands support bison, bighorn sheep, deer and antelope. 

The headquarters and visitor center are at Cedar Pass, 2-1/2 miles 
(4.25 km) northeast of Interior on Route 16A, 28 miles (45.08 km) south- 
west of Kodoka and 29 miles (46.69 km) southeast of Wall — both on 1-90. 
Ramps cross a parking area curb and three steps near the visitor center. 
Door openings, including those to the restrooms, are more than ade- 
quate. Restrooms are designed to accommodate wheelchairs. Cedar 
Pass Lodge has a curb ramp, an entrance at curb level, and accessible 
guest rooms and restrooms. Each public building is on one floor. 

All but two of the 18 viewpoints and overlooks are accessible. The 
Fossil Exhibit Loop Trail is accessible for about two-thirds of its length. 
An interpretive shelter and wayside exhibit at the end of the trail loop 
can be reached from the right leg of the loop over a slight approach 
grade. Audiovisual programs are offered in the visitor center. Cedar 
Pass Campground amphitheater, reached by a paved path from the 
parking area, has evening programs. Reservations for lodgings should 
be made with Cedar Pass Lodge. Telephone (605) 433-5460. The 
nearest full range of medical services is in Kodoka or in Wall. 



Jewel Cave National Monument 

c/o Wind Cave National Park 
Hot Springs, South Dakota 57747 
(605)727-2301 

Caverns, in limestone formation, consist of a series of chambers connect- 
ed by narrow passages, with many side galleries and fine, colorful 
jewel-like calcite crystal encrustations. 

The visitor center is located on U.S. 16, 14 miles (22.54 km) west of 
Custer. A ramp leads from the parking lot to the visitor center lobby and 
displays. Double doors allow easy entry to the visitor center and the 
restrooms are fully accessible and equipped. 

The first of the cave rooms is easily accessible by elevator down to 
that level and visitors in wheelchairs can be escorted here for interpre- 
tive talks. 

Average elevation of the mam park features is 5,400 feet (1,644.84 
m). Food, lodging and medical facilities are available in Custer. 



South Dakota 147 



Mount Rushmore National Memorial 

Keystone, South Dakota 5775 1 

(605) 574-2523 

Colossal heads of Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, 

Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt were sculptured by Gutzon 

Borglum on the face of a granite mountain here. 

The sculpture is located in the pine-covered Black Hills of South Dakota 
at a 5,250-foot (1,599.15 m) elevation. The visitor center is 3 miles 
(4.83 km) southwest of Keystone on SD 87 and 25 miles (40.25 km) 
south of Rapid City on U.S. 16. Sloping ramps from parking lot #4 give 
access to the visitor center 200 yards (182.88 m) nearer the sculpture. 
The concession, 100 yards (91.44 m) farther on, is accessible by another 
sloping ramp. The trailside restroom near the west end of the parking 
lot is fully accessible. Numerous rest benches are situated along the 
paved trails throughout the area. Trails are all railed. Some rather steep 
trail slopes may require assistance. 

A full-length film, titled Four Faces on a Mountain, is shown at the 
visitor center view room each summer evening simultaneously with the 
regular evening amphitheater sculpture lighting ceremony. Seating in 
the view room for the showing is restricted to visitors in wheelchairs and 
their immediate families due to space limitations of the facility. This is the 
same movie which is provided in the memorial amphitheater during the 
evening program. 

Displays of a 5-foot (1.524 m), 1/12 scale, plaster cast of the Lincoln 
face, and touch and feel tools are available for visitors with visual 
handicaps. 

The concession provides adequate access, well-spaced aisles, seat- 
ing for food service and fully accessible restrooms. 

The nearest medical services are in Rapid City. The nearest food 
and accessible lodgings are in Keystone. 



Wind Cave National Park 

Hot Springs, South Dakota 57747 
(605)727-2301 

77?ese limestone caverns m the scenic Black Hills are decorated by beau- 
tiful box work and calcite crystal formations. Elk, deer, pronghorn, 
prairie dogs and bison live in the park. 

The visitor center is 1 1 miles ( 17.70 km) from the town of Hot Springs on 
U.S. 385. The parking lot is 100 feet (30.46 m) from the visitor center at 
its nearest point and is so located, near a line of heavy traffic, that a curb 
ramp would be dangerous. Assistance over the curb, therefore, will be 
needed for visitors in wheelchairs. Other single steps into the visitor 
center and to the museum and concessioner shop are to have ramps. 
The restrooms are on the floor below the lobby floor and are reached by 
a flight of several steps. 



148 South Dakota 



The 100-space Elk Mountain Campground is 1/2 mile (0.80 km) 
from the visitor center. Campfire programs are given at the campground 
during the summer season. Restrooms at the campground have 27- 
inch (68.58 cm) entry doors and stall doors 22 inches (55.88 cm) wide. 
Upon request, a short tour of the cave is provided visitors in wheel- 
chairs by use of an elevator into and out of the Garden of Eden section, 
200 feet (60.96 m) below ground level. 

Average elevation of mam park features is 4,000 feet (1,218.40 m). 
Food, lodging and medical facilities, including a hospital are available 
in Hot Springs. 



Tennessee 149 



Andrew Johnson National Historic Site 

Depot and College Streets 

Greeneville, Tennessee 37743 

(615)638-3551 

This site includes the home and tailor shop of Andrew Johnson, the 17th 

President, who served from 1865 to 1869, and the Andrew Johnson 

National Cemetery, where he is buried. 

The visitor center is accessible by ramp from the sidewalk. The parking 
area, however, is across the street from the visitor center. The parking 
area curb has a ramp but the intervening street curbs do not. Auto- 
mobiles carrying visitors in wheelchairs may discharge passengers at 
the curb in front of the visitor center. Restroom entry doors in the visitor 
center are 31 inches (78.74 cm) wide and stall doors are 23 inches 
(58.42 cm) wide. 

The homestead is 2-1/2 blocks from the visitor center. The historic 
building has a difficult access with two steps at the entrance where 
ramps are not feasible. The second floor is reached by a steep stairway, 
but the basement kitchen, at the rear of the house, is accessible at ground 
level. 

All roads are level with the exception of parts of the loop road at 
the Andrew Johnson Cemetery. A pullout along the loop road provides a 
view of the Presidential burial plot, which is reached for closer viewing by 
eight steep steps. 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area Ky.-Tenn. 

c/o Southeast Regional Office, National Park Service 

1895 Phoenix Boulevard 

Atlanta, Georgia 30349 

(404) 996-2520 

Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries offer scenic 

gorges and valleys. 

The Secretaries of the Army and of the Interior were authorized to enter 
into agreement for National Park Service management when a "suffici- 
ently administrable area" has been acquired. Authorized Mar. 7, 1974; 
National Park Service management authorized October 22, 1976. There 
are no Federal facilities. 



Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park 

(See Georgia) 



1 50 Tennessee 



Cumberland Gap National Historical Park 

(See Kentucky) 



Fort Donelson National Military Park 

P.O. Box F 

Dover, Tennessee 37058 

(615)232-5348 

The first major victory for the Union Army in the Civil War occurred at 

Fort Donelson m February of 1862, under the leadership of Ulysses S. 

Grant. Fort Donelson (Dover) National Cemetery— 1,942 interments, 

512 unidentified — adjoins the park. 

The visitor center is located 1 mile (1.61 km) west of Dover on U.S. 79, 
and is accessible from the parking area. The ground level includes the 
lobby and the theater. Audiovisual programs and interpretive talks are 
given in the audio room. The restrooms are two flights downstairs in the 
basement, and the observation deck is on the second floor, one flight up. 

Significant features of the self-guiding park tour can be seen from a 
car. Pushbutton audiovisual interpretation is available at the Water 
Battery position. Living history programs are presented outside the 
visitor center. 

The nearest accessible lodging, restrooms, restaurants and medical 
services are in Clarksville, 30 miles (48.3 km) east of Dover, or Paris, the 
same distance west of Dover, both on U.S. 79. 



Great Smoky Mountains National Park 

Gatlinburg, Tennessee 37738 

(615)436-5615 

One of the world's oldest mountain ranges, the Great Smoky Mountains 

have a diversified and luxuriant plantlife and unique historical attractions. 

The park is in North Carolina and Tennessee. 

Park headquarters and the Sugarlands visitor center are on U.S. 441, 
south of Gatlinburg, Tenn. The parking area has designated spaces and 
a ramp over the curb. The visitor center is accessible by ramp, and rest- 
rooms, drinking fountain and telephone are fully accessible. Exhibits 
and an orientation audiovisual program are offered. Printed materials 
and maps may be obtained at Sugarlands visitor center. 

Restrooms in the Oconaluftee visitor center and Pioneer Museum 
are fully accessible and the entry has ramps for access. The trails around 
the Pioneer Farmstead at Oconaluftee are accessible. 

The trails and the walk to Clingman's Dome Tower, off the park 
road, are paved, but for the steep 10 percent grade to the observation 
platform, the highest point in the park, assistance will be required. 

The John P. Cable Mill area and the orientation shelter in Cades 
Cover are fully accessible, but restrooms are inadequate. 



Tennessee 1 5 1 



A substantial program is underway to augment and upgrade the 
facilities, programs, trails and campgrounds, to provide fully accessible 
facilities throughout, and relevant programs and interpretive services 
for all visitors. Visitors planning trips to the park should contact park 
headquarters for updated information. Accessible restaurants, lodgings 
and medical services are at Gatlmburg. 



Natchez Trace Parkway 

(See Mississippi) 



Obed Wild and Scenic River 

c/o Southeast Regional Office, 

National Park Service 

1895 Phoenix Boulevard 

Atlanta, Georgia 30349 

(404) 996-2520 

Parts of Obed and Emory Rivers and parts of Clear Creek and Daddys 

Creek in Eastern Tennessee, south of Oak Ridge, are included in this 

area. 

This new wild and scenic river was authorized by an Act of Congress 
signed October 12, 1976. There are no Federal facilities. 



Shiloh National Military Park 

Shiloh, Tennessee 38376 

(901) 689-3410 via lackson to Savannah, Tennessee 

The bitter battle fought here at Shiloh April 6-7, 1862, prepared the way 

for Ma]. Gen. U.S. Grant's successful siege of Vicksburg. Well-preserved 

prehistoric Indian mounds overlook the river. 

The visitor center is 12 miles (19.32 km) south of Savannah, via State 
Highway 22 and U.S. 64. The mam parking area has 20 parking spaces 
adjacent to level walks leading to the visitor center. Ramps over the 
parking area curb and over the visitor center steps provide easy access. 
Restrooms are in the parking area and in the visitor center. Entry doors 
in the parking area restrooms are 27 inches (68.58 cm) wide and stall 
doors are 22 inches (55.88 cm) wide. In the visitor center, restroom entry 
doors are 29 inches (73.66 cm) wide and stall doors 22 inches (55.88 cm) 
wide. Plans are being formulated to remodel the restrooms to provide 
for full accessibility. 

The center has an auditorium and exhibit room. A 25-minute movie, 
"Shiloh, Portrait of a Battle," is presented and the exhibit room has an 
illuminated map showing troop movements. Living history programs are 
given outside the visitor center. Major battlefield points of interest can be 
seen by car. A tour map is available at the visitor center and many stops 
on the park road have audio interpretive stations. 



1 52 Tennessee 



Stones River National Battlefield 

P.O. Box 1039, Route 2, Old Nashville Highway 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37 1 30 

(615)893-9501 

The fierce midwinter battle which began the Federal offensive to trisect 

the Confederacy, took place at Stones River Dec 21, 1862— Jan. 2, 1863. 

The visitor center is 3 miles (4.83 km) north of Murfreesboro on Old 
Nashville Highway. A yellow painted ramp extends from the parking 
area, where there are designated spaces to the visitor center walk. 
Restroom doors are 56 inches (142.24 cm) wide and stall doors are 24 
inches (60.96 cm) wide. Assistance may be needed over the one-step 
entry to the restrooms. Plans are being formulated to relocate the rest- 
rooms and provide fully accessible facilities. 

Exhibits and audiovisual programs are provided in the visitor center. 
One exhibit of Civil War uniforms and accoutrements can be touched. A 
28-mmute orientation film is also presented in the visitor center. The battle- 
field can be seen by car. Self-guiding tour folders and an auto-tape tour 
cassette are available at the visitor center. Two push-button stations — one 
audio and the other audiovisual — are on the park tour. The National 
Cemetery is accessible but has some slight grades. 

Other points of interest are accessible by short, paved trails. The 
Hazen Brigade Monument, the oldest-known Civil War Monument, is a 
short walk from the monument parking area. 



Texas 1 53 



Alibates Flint Quarries 

and Texas Panhandle Pueblo Culture National Monument 

c/o Lake Meredith NRA 

Box 1438 

Fntch, Texas 79036 

(806)857-3151 

For more than 10,000 years, pre-Columbian Indians dug agatized 

dolomite at these quarries to make projectile points, knives, scrapers 

and other tools. 

This new area is undeveloped and is entirely inaccessible. There is no 
visitor center and the trail to the flint quarries is rough and steep. 



Amistad National Recreation Area 

P.O.Box 1463 

Del Rio, Texas 78840 

(512)775-7491 

Boating and watersports highlight activities in the United States part of 

the Amistad Reservoir on the Rio Grande. 

The park headquarters, which serves as a visitor center, is located in 
Del Rio, 10 miles (16.1 km) from the lake. Ground level restrooms are 
acessible with entrance doors 36 inches (91.44 cm) wide; stall doors 
are 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. Information about fishing and boating 
is available at the visitor center. Ranger contact stations are at various 
docks, accessible by automobile. 

Visitors in wheelchairs can fish from certain points along the shore. 

At three major boat ramps — Pecos Canyon, Diablo East and Rough 
Canyon — automobiles carrying visitors in wheelchairs may be driven to 
the edge of the courtesy boat docks. From there, the visitors are assisted 
onto the courtesy boat dock to boat sidings and access to the boats. 
These docking areas provide only portable, chemical toilets. 



Big Bend National Park 

Big Bend National Park 

Panther Junction, Texas 79834 

(915)477-2251 

Mountain scenery contrasts with desert m this great bend of the Rio 

Grande. A variety of unusual geological features is also seen here. 

The administration building is located 25 miles (40.23 km) off Highway 
385, 75 miles ( 120.68 km) south of Marathon. The building and its rest- 
rooms are fully accessible, the first aid room is accessible from the rear 
of the building. Also accessible are restrooms at Rio Grande Village, 
Castolon and Chisos Basin. 



1 54 Texas 



At the Chisos Mountain Lodge in Chisos Basin, 10 miles ( 16. 10 km) 
south of Panther Junction, the lobby, dining room and patio are at side- 
walk level and fully accessible. Some guestrooms are also. Reservations 
should be made for these units by calling the Lodge at (915) 477-2291. 

The Rio Grande Village Campground is accessible. The cavalry 
post at Castolon, ruins of old ranch homes, the deserted trading post 
at Hot Springs, as well as the Chihuahuan Desert, Santa Elena and 
Boquillas Canyons, desert badlands and the Chisos Mountains may be 
viewed from a car. Elevation along the main roads ranges from 1,800 
to 5,800 feet (548.28 to 1,766.68 m). All features except the Chisos 
Mountains may be viewed without exceeding 4,000 feet (1,218.40 m). 

At the park entrance on Highway 385 are the Persimmon Gap 
visual exhibit and an audiovisual slide program. A number of wayside 
exhibits have raised, big print or carved wood interpretive plaques. An 
outdoor fossilbone exhibit, about 7 miles (11.27 km) north of Panther 
Junction, is reached by a short, paved, slightly inclined, ascending trail. 
The audio message at this exhibit is powered by solar cell. 



Big Thicket National Preserve 

P.O. Box 7408 
Beaumont, Texas 77706 

This unique ecosystem, with inviting research possibilities, contains alli- 
gator, Texas red wolf, black bear, ocelot and 300 bird species, possibly 
including the near-extinct ivorybiJIed woodpecker. 

Not yet open to the public, the park is still being developed and currently 
there are no facilities here. 



Chamizal National Memorial 

620 First City National Bank Building 

El Paso, Texas 79901 

(915)543-7780 

Visitor Center location: 800 South San Marcial 

El Paso, Texas 79905 
The peaceful settlement of a 99-year boundary dispute between the 
United States and Mexico is memorialized here. The Chamizal Treaty, 
ending the dispute, was signed in 1963. An amphitheater and 500-seat 
auditorium are used by theatrical groups from both nations. 

A documentary film and a small permanent museum portray history from 
the International Boundary Survey (1849-57) through the present. Tem- 
porary exhibits, films, theater presentations and outdoor festivals in 
landscaped settings stress the cultural aspects of the two nations. Annual 
festivals include the Border Folk Festival in the first weekend in October, 
the El Paso-Chamizal Fiesta of the Arts, the week of July 4; and Spanish 
Siglo de Ora (Golden Age) Drama Festival in March. 



Texas 1 55 



The theater is 400-feet (121.84 m) away from the parking lot. An 
electric car is available for persons who need transportation. Restrooms 
in the visitor center-theater complex are equipped for wheelchairs and 
the theater has one row of barrier-free seats. 



Fort Davis National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 1456 
Fort Davis, Texas 79734 
(915)426-3225 

A key post in the West Texas defensive system, the fort guarded emi- 
grants on the San Antonio-El Paso road from 1854 to 1891. ft is a "Living 
History" area. 

The headquarters, visitor center and museum are together in a restored 
and remodeled building at the entrance of the fort. Rarnps over parking 
area curbs and onto the visitor center porch make the area fully acces- 
sible. The parking lot is 75 yards (68.58 m) from the visitor center. 
Grounds around the fort are fairly level but not graded. The picnic area 
is a short distance from the visitor center. Visitors can drive and park in 
this area. An electric cart is available, free of charge, for persons who 
need transportation over distances more than 25-50 yards (23-46 m). 
Users must be accompanied by a person with a valid driver's license. 
Restrooms are 35 inches (88.90 cm) wide at entry, but the stall doors are 
2 1 inches (53.34 cm). 

Visitors come first into the museum for orientation, a slide program 
and exhibits. An audio-tape program is offered outside of the visitor 
center. "Living history" programs and guided tours of the restored and 
refurnished quarters, barracks, kitchens and other buildings are offered 
during the summer months. 

The nearest food and lodging facilities are at "Indian Lodge" in 
the Davis Mountain State Park, 4 miles (6.44 km) west on State High- 
way 118. All facilities are accessible. The telephone for reservations is 
(915)426-3254. 

The average elevation is 5,000 feet (1,523.00 m). 



Guadalupe Mountains National Park 

3225 National Parks Highway 

Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 

(915)828-3385 

Rising from the desert, this mountain mass contains portions of the 

world's most extensive and significant Permian limestone fossil reef 

around an ancient sea. Other features are a tremendous earth fault, 

lofty peaks, unusual fauna and flora, desert-alpine-hardwood plant 

forms in a variety of combinations, and a colorful record of the past. 

The park information station is on U.S. 62-180, 55 miles southwest of 



156 Texas 



Carlsbad and 1 10 miles east of El Paso. Only limited, temporary facilities 
are available, and these are not readily accessible. Three steps lead up 
the porch of the temporary visitor center. The center has one restroom 
with a door width of 35 inches (88.90 cm). A fully accessible restroom is 
located at a roadside rest area 8 miles east of the visitor center on High- 
way 62-180. 

Visitors can see portions of the reef escarpment, spectacular El 
Capitan, with its sheer 2,000 foot (308.0 m) cliff face, and Guadalupe 
Peak, highest point in Texas, as they travel U.S. Highway 62-180 through 
the southwestern portion of the park, between Carlsbad and El Paso. 
Also to be seen from a car are the remains of the Pinery Stage Station on 
the Butterfield Overland Mail Line's run from St. Louis to San Francisco. 
The remains are seen from a pullout, 1 mile (1.61 km) west of the park 
information station One can also see the historic ranch house and build- 
ing at Frijole, x k mile (.80 km) from the information station on a good 
gravel road. 

A temporary drive-m campground with pit toilets is Wz miles (2.41 
km) west of the information station. Elevations along the roads range 
from 3,800 feet ( 1, 157.48 m) west of the park to 5,700 feet (1,736.22 m) in 
the Guadalupe Pass area and 7,000 to 8,750 feet (2,297 to 2,870 m) in 
the park's high country. Food, lodging and medical facilities are available 
in Carlsbad and El Paso. 



Lake Meredith National Recreation Area 

P.O.Box 1438 

Fntch, Texas 79036 

(806)857-3151 

The area is a popular water activity site centered at manmade Lake 

Meredith on the Canadian River 

The headquarters building, located on Highway 1 36 in Fntch, is acces- 
sible. Its restroom is fully equipped for visitors in wheelchairs. 

Information about facilities at the various recreation sites on the lake 
front may be obtained at the park headquarters. 



Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 329, Johnson City, Texas 78636 

(512)868-7128 

The site contains the birthplace, boyhood home and ranch of the 36th 

President, together with his grandparents' old ranch. 

The Johnson City Unit includes the Boyhood Home and the adja- 
cent visitor center. The home, located in the block of 9th Street and 
Avenue E, has steps in front and rear. The tour here is from front to 
back. Ramps are mfeasible as the doors are narrow. The temporary 
visitor center is another older house in the same block, open only in 



Texas 1 57 



the summer, and equally difficult of access. Plans for permanent and 
fully accessible visitor center and related facilities are under de- 
velopment. The temporary restroom facilities are in a separate build- 
ing. The facilities are accessible but not fully equipped. 

The Johnson Settlement is a "Living History" area. It is 
reached by horse or mule-drawn freight wagons and by a 1/2- 
mile (.80 km) footpath from the visitor center. Restrooms at the new 
Settlement exhibit center have been designed for full accessibility. 
Other historic structures in this area can be visited with assistance. 
The nature trail, five blocks from the Boyhood Home, is in the Settle- 
ment area and reached by hard-packed gravel. 

LBJ Ranch Unit includes the Birthplace, Johnson Family Ceme- 
tery, Junction School, The Texas House, Showbarn and ranch lands. 
Private cars are not permitted on the ranch lands. Bus tours take 
visitors to all of the areas, starting and ending at the State Park 
visitor center at the crossroads of Ranch Road Number 1 and U.S. 
Highway 290. The State Park visitor center has fully accessible 
restrooms. Visitors leave the bus at two locations: the Birthplace and 
the Showbarn. A level gravel path, 375 feet (113. m) long, leads 
from the bus stop to the Birthplace, which is entered by narrow 
flights of four steps to the porch, in front, and three steps at the rear 
entry. The Showbarn is entered at ground level. Work is being done 
to fit the double-wide mini-buses with ramps, provide loading lifts 
at all stops and remodel some of the present buses or acquire others 
to provide more space and greater accessibility for visitors with 
wheelchairs. A special pass is available to the privately owned 
vehicle transporting wheelchair-bound visitors to tour the birth- 
place, school and cemetery areas only. Advance arrangements 
must be made for group bus tours. 

Information concerning food, lodging and medical facilities 
in Johnson City is available at either of the visitor centers. 



Padre Island National Seashore 

9405 South Padre Island Drive 

Corpus Chnsti, Texas 78418 

(512)937-2621 

This 80.5-mile (129.55-km) stretch of barrier island along the Gulf Coast 

is noted for its wide, sandy beaches, excellent fishing and abundant bird 

and marine life. 

The new visitor center and headquarters in Corpus Chnsti are fully 
accessible. Maps, interpretive pamphlets and general information are 
available at the visitor center. 

The concession area has a snack bar, showers, restrooms and a 
gift shop. A 400-foot (121.84-m) elevated walkway parallels Malaquite 



1 58 Texas 



Beach, 20 miles (32.20 km) south of Corpus Christi on Farm Road 22. 
All parts of the area are fully accessible except the view tower. The 
tower is reached by three winding ramps, separated by steep flights of 
steps. Restrooms have 48-inch (121.92 cm) entry doors, and stalls have 
34-inch (86.36 cm) doors. 

Paved walks lead to the beach from the concession area. The beach 
immediately facing the concession area is often solid enough to accom- 
modate wheelchairs. Some nature walks are held on the beach, where 
excellent opportunities also exist for beachcombing, fishing and bird- 
watching. Campfire talks are given 20 feet (6.08 m) off the pavement at 
the campground, which is built on solid surface. 



San Jose Mission National Historic Site 

6539 San Jose Drive 

San Antonio, Texas 782 14 

This mission is an outstanding example of the frontier missions that 

stretched across the Southwest in the 18th century. 

The site was designated June 1, 1941. It is administered cooperatively 
by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Archdiocese of San 
Antonio, the National Park Service, the San Antonio Conservation 
Society and Bexar County. It is an Affiliated Area. 



Utah 159 



Arches National Park 

c/o Canyonlands National Park 
446 South Mam Street 
Moab, Utah 84532 
(801)259-7165 

Extraordinary products of erosion in the form of giant arches, windows, 
pinnacles and balanced rocks change color here constantly in the 
sunlight. 

The visitor center, 5 miles (8.05 km) northwest of Moab on U.S. 163, is 
accessible by ramp. Restrooms are designed to accommodate wheel- 
chairs. Audiovisual programs are offered in the visitor center and the 
nearby Devils Garden campfire programs include interpretive talks. 

Numerous formations may be enjoyed from the 21 miles (33.80 km) 
of paved roads. A number of overlooks are accessible, including Park 
Avenue, which has a short surfaced trail, LaSal Mountains viewpoint, 
where a short trail leads to Courthouse Towers overlook, and the Win- 
dows Section where most of the arches can be seen from the paved 
road. Such features as Panorama viewpoint, Balanced Rock and Wolfe 
Cabin may be seen from the road. 

The average elevation of the main features is 5,000 feet (1,523.0 m). 
Delicate Arch is reached by a difficult 1 1/2 mile (2.01 km) trail with a 
rise of 500 feet (152.30 m). The route through the Fiery Furnace area, a 
2-mile (3.22 km) walk, is over rough terrain. 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Moab. 



Bryce Canyon National Park 

Bryce Canyon, Utah 847 1 7 

(801)834-5322 

In horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters along the edge of the Paunsaugunt 

Plateau in southern Utah, stand innumerable highly colored and 

grotesque pinnacles, walls and spires, perhaps the most colorful and 

unusual erosional forms in the world. 

The visitor center is 26 miles (41.86 km) southeast of Panguitch via 
Utah 64 and 12. The four steps to the entry have a slow-incline ramp with 
handrails. The restroom doors are 34 inches (86.36 cm) wide, the stall 
doors 24 inches (60.96 cm) wide. Plans are underway to modify the 
restrooms. Parking area curbs at the visitor center and Sunset Point have 
ramps. All of the overlooks are fully accessible. At the visitor center and 
auditorium, all audiovisual and other interpretive programs and exhibits 
are fully accessible. 

Elevations range from 8,000 to 9,000 feet (2,436.80 to 2,741.40 m). 
Camper services, food and lodging are available at the concessioner- 
operated Bryce Lodge, which is open from May to October. For reser- 
vations and information as to accessibility of lodgings, call (80 1 ) 834-536 1 . 
Information about other fully accessible lodgings near the park may be 
obtained from park personnel at the visitor center. A full range of medical 
services, food and lodgings is available at Panguitch. 



160 Utah 



Canyonlands National Park 

446 South Mam 

Moab, Utah 84532 

(801)259-7165 

In this geological wonderland, rocks, spires, and mesas rise more than 

7,800 leet (2,377.44 m). Here, too, are extensive petroglyphs left by 

Indians about 1,000 years ago. 

The headquarters building in Moab is fully accessible with restrooms 
designed to accommodate wheelchairs. However, no park facilities are 
available. Information trailers serve as visitor centers in both the Island 
and Needles Districts. Campgrounds in both districts have pit toilets 
and picnic tables. All trails have steep grades. Squaw Flat area in the 
Needles District and The Neck, Grand View Point and Green River 
Overlook, in Island District are all accessible by car. 

Food, lodging and medical services nearest to Island District are 
available in Moab, 35 miles (56.35 km) north. Food, lodging and medical 
services nearest to Needles District are available in Monticello on U.S. 
163 about 50 miles (80.5 km) east. Elevations range from 5,000 feet 
(1,523.00 m) in the Needles District to 6,000 feet (1,827.60 m) in the 
Island District. 



Capitol Reef National Park 

Torrey, Utah 84775 
(801)425-3871 

Narrow high-walled gorges cut through a 60-mile (96.6 km) uplift of 
sandstone cliffs with highly colored sedimentary formations. Dome- 
shaped white-cap rock along the Fremont River accounts lor the name. 

The visitor center and two interpretive shelters at Capitol Gorge are 
accessible by wheelchair, as are the restrooms and drinking fountains 
at the visitor center. There are two scenic drives with wayside exhibits. 
Special conducted tours are available to visitors on a group basis, and 
uniformed personnel are available to assist and give informal interpretive 
talks at all times. 

The visitor center is 12 miles (19.32 km) east of Torrey on Utah 
Highway 24. Operation of Capitol Reef Lodge, 1 mile (1.61 km) south of 
the visitor center, at the end of the self-guiding scenic drive, is tentative in 
1978. Food and lodging are available in nearby communities. The near- 
est full range of medical services is at Richfield, 72 miles (1 15.92 km) 
west of the visitor center on U.S. 89. 

Elevation along the roads ranges from 5,200 to 6,200 feet, with the 
western approach over 8,000 feet The average elevation from which 
mam features can be viewed is 5,400 feet ( 1,645.92 m). All trails except 
Capitol Gorge, Grand Wash and Fremont Canyon are very steep and 
rocky. 



Utah 161 



Cedar Breaks National Monument 

P.O. Box 749 

Cedar City, Utah 84720 

(801)586-9451 

A huge natural amphitheater has eroded into the variegated Pink Cliffs 

(Wasatch Formation), which are 2,000 feet (609.6 m) thick at this point. 

Park headquarters is in Cedar City at 82 North 100 East. Visitors will 
also find food, lodging and medical services in Cedar City. The visitor 
center in the monument is 23 miles (41.86 km) northeast of Cedar City, 
18 miles (28.98 km) east on Utah 14, and north on Utah 143 5 miles 
(8.05 km). 

The visitor center is an old Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) 
building with three steps at the entry and narrow doors, making access 
difficult. Restrooms in the center have 24-mch (60.96 cm) wide entry 
doors and stall doors are 42-mches (106.68 cm) wide. Entry doors and 
stall doors in the campground comfort stations, respectively, are 29- 
mches (73.66 cm) and 2 1-mches (53.34 cm) wide. 

The Rim Drive overlooks are all accessible. The descriptive pamphlet 
available at the headquarters in Cedar City details the features to be 
seen on the Rim Drive. The one self-guiding trail is rocky and steep. 
Naturalist talks are presented in the visitor center. 

The area is open mid-May/June through mid-September/October, 
as weather conditions permit. Wildflowers are at their peak from July 
through mid-August, fall colors at their brightest from September through 
October. The elevation of the monument is above 10,300 feet (3, 1 37.38 m). 



Dinosaur National Monument 

(See Colorado) 



Golden Spike National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 394 

Bngham City, Utah 84302 

(801)471-2209 

Completion of the first transcontinental railroad m the United States was 

celebrated here where the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads 

met in 1869. 

The site is located 35 miles (56.35 km) west of Bngham City on U.S. 83. 
The visitor center, level with the sidewalk, is accessible from the parking 
lot 35 feet (10.66 m) distant and has double doors which remain open 
long enough to permit passage of wheelchairs. The restrooms have entry 
doors of 31 inches (78.74 cm) width; stalls are equipped with handrails 
and have doors 26 inches (66.04 cm) wide. 

Some exhibits are in open cases or on open stands inviting tactile 
examination by visitors with visual handicaps. From the visitor center, a 



162 Utah 



150-foot (45.69 m) trail, level and paved, leads to the "last spike" site 
where vintage steam locomotives stand head to head. The East and 
West Grades tour is self-guiding by car. Living history programs are 
scheduled throughout the summer. 

The site is open only in the daytime throughout the year. The eleva- 
tion of the site is 5,000 feet (1,523.00 m). The nearest food, lodging and 
medical services are at Tremonton 25 miles (40.25 km) northeast of the 
site on U.S. 83 and 84, or at Brigham City. 



Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Ariz -Utah 

P.O. Box 1507 

Page, Arizona 86040 

(602)645-2471 

Lake Powell, formed by the Colorado River, stretches for 186 miles 

(299.46 km) behind one of the highest dams in the world. The area is 

in Arizona and Utah. 

Park headquarters is located at 337 North Navajo Drive in Page, Ariz, 
on U.S. 89. The visitor center is at the damsite, about 1 mile (1.61 km) 
from Page on U.S. 89. One restroom in the visitor center is accessible to 
visitors in wheelchairs. The entry door width is 32 inches (81.28 cm) 
giving access to the room which is equipped with grab bars and serves 
as restroom for both men and women. Information concerning accessible 
restrooms in this and all other units of the Recreation Area should be 
sought at the visitor center or at the District Ranger Station. 

There are level walks around the area and ramps over small barriers 
to entry of both the visitor center and the Wahweap motel-restaurant, 
as well as to picnic areas, campgrounds and the boat tour office. Access 
to the boats is by a steep ramp and the boats themselves present many 
difficulties to visitors in wheelchairs, such as steps, narrow passages 
and doors. 

The Glen Canyon Dam parking area, 50 feet (15.23 m) from the 
visitor center, gives access by ramp to a shallow terrace. Exhibits, inter- 
pretive programs, and audiovisual programs are provided in the visitor 
center. A self-guiding tour of the dam may be taken by elevator. 

The Wahweap Lodge on the waterfront has accessible guest rooms, 
but reservations should be made well in advance of the trip by writing 
or calling the Lodge, care of the park, (602) 645-2433. The nearest full 
range of medical facilities is in Page. Other accessible lodgings can be 
found in Page. 

Elevations of the various overlooks and other units are: 4,060 feet 
(1,236.68 m) at Wahweap; 3,150 feet (959.49 m) at Lees Ferry, and 
4, 1 18 feet (1,254.34 m) at Halls and Bullfrog Crossings. 



Hovenweep National Monument 

(See Colorado) 



Utah 163 



Natural Bridges National Monument 

c/o Canyonlands National Park 
446 South Mam 
Moab, Utah 84532 
(80 1)JL 7- 11 90 Mobile 

Three natural bridges, carved out of sandstone, are protected here. The 
highest is 220 feet (67.01 m) above the streambed, with a span of 268 
feet (81.63 m). 

A visitor center is located 120 miles (193.2 km) south of Moab on U.S. 
163 and State Highway 95 from Blandmg. The road is paved. The center 
with exhibits and audiovisual programs is fully accessible and rest- 
rooms are designed to accommodate wheelchairs. A relief map at the 
center may be touched by visitors with visual impairment. Campfire 
programs are scheduled in the summer. 

The 8-mile (12.87 km), one-way loop road following the canyon 
rims to the various natural bridge overlooks is fully accessible by auto- 
mobile. Concrete scenic walks or foot trails, 100 to 200 yards (91.44 to 
182.88 m) long and at least 5 feet (1.524 cm) wide, lead to the fenced 
observation platforms where visitors may obtain good views of the 
bridges. Assistance may be needed on some of the steeper foot trails. 

The average elevation of the monument is 6,500 feet (1,981.2 m). 
Food, accessible lodgings and medical services are available in Bland- 
ing, 40 miles (64.4 km) east on Utah 95. 



Rainbow Bridge National Monument 

c/o Glen Canyon National Recreation Area 
P.O.Box 1507 
Page, Arizona 86040 
(602)^645-2471 

Rainbow Bridge is the greatest of the world's natural bridges, a sym- 
metrical arch of salmon-pink sandstone, rising 309 feet above Bridge 
Creek. 

There are no facilities at the monument. The site is reached by a 55-mile 
(88.55 km) boat ride from Wahweap or Halls Crossing, followed by a 
1-mile (1.61 km) hike over rough terrain from the nearest landing on 
Lake Powell. 



Timpanogos Cave National Monument 

Route 2, Box 200 

American Fork, Utah 84003 

(801)756-4497 

This colorful limestone cavern on the side of Mount Timpanogos is 

noted for hehctites — water-created formations that grow m all directions 

and shapes, regardless of the pull of gra vity. 



164 Utah 



The monument is located 7 miles (1 1.27 km) east of American Fork on 
State Road 80. The visitor center is accessible by ramp at the east end of 
the parking area, which leads to the sidewalk along the front of the center, 
with entry at ground level. The parking lot is 8 yards (7.32 m) from the 
center. The lobby, auditorium, exhibit room and restrooms are on the 
ground floor. Room floors are carpeted except in the restrooms where 
they are unwaxed tile. Restroom doors are 31 inches (78.74 cm) wide 
and stall doors are 24 1/2 inches (62.23 cm) wide. The curio shop, food 
service and patio are also accessible by ramp over a 4-mch (10.16 cm) 
step. 

Graded, paved paths run throughout the picnic area. The trip to 
and through the cave is by a very strenuous and steep 1 1/2-mile 
(2.41 km) access trail, and numerous low-ceilinged areas are in the cave. 
The nature trail is a difficult one with tight switchbacks and very steep 
grades at both ends and without rope or handrail guide. The trail will be 
of interest to visitors with visual handicaps accompanied by sighted 
companions, using the printed guide or tape recorded message which 
are available at the visitor center. The guide emphasizes touching, smel- 
ling and listening. 

Reservations are required for groups of more than 10 persons. The 
best time to visit is mid-May to mid-October. No mass transportation is 
available. Elevation of the visitor center is 5,665 feet (1,725.56 m), at the 
cave, 6,730 feet (2,049.95 m). 

Some food and lodging facilities and adequate medical facilities 
are available in American Fork. More extensive facilities are in Pleasant 
Grove, about 10 miles (16.1 km) southeast of the monument on U.S. 89. 



Zion National Park 

Spnngdale, Utah 84767 

(801)772-3256 

Colorful canyon and mesa scenery includes erosion and rockfault 

patterns that create phenomenal shapes and landscapes. Evidence of 

former volcanic activity is here, too. 

The visitor center is one mile (1.61 km) from Spnngdale which is right 
on the boundary of the park on Utah. 15. The visitor center is accessible 
from the nearby parking lot. It has a museum, information and sales 
counter, audiovisual and interpretive programs. Restroom entry doors 
are 32 inches (81.28 cm wide and the widest stall doors are 24 inches 
(60.96 cm). 

The ground floor of Zion Lodge is accessible and has a soda 
fountain, gift shops, reservations desk, auditorium and adequate rest- 
rooms. The restaurant on the second floor is reached by a long flight of 
steps. The cabin/guest quarters have one or two narrow stone steps to 
the porch entry. Assistance is available and some may be provided with 
portable ramps. For reservations for lodgings presenting the least 
difficulty of access, call the Lodge at (80 1 ) 772-32 1 3. 



Utah 165 



Of the many trails, the Gateway to the Narrows Trail is most acces- 
sible. It is a paved, relatively level trail, leading 1 mile (1.61 km) up the 
canyon from the end of Zion Canyon Scenic Drive. Summer programs 
include evening talks at the South and Watchman Campgrounds and a 
conducted walk along the Gateway to the Narrows Trail. 

Elevation of the three paved roads ranges from 3,600 to 6,500 feet 
(1,096.56 to 1,979.90 m) The popular Zion Canyon Scenic Drive is 
below 4,400 feet (1,340.24 m). The back country is accessible only by 
strenuous hiking or riding. 

The nearest fully accessible restaurants and lodging are at Spring- 
dale. The nearest clinic is at Hurricane, 25 miles west of Spnngdale on 
Utah 1.5. 



1 66 Vermont / Virginia 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Virginia 

Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Appomattox Court House National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 218 

Appomattox, Virginia 24522 

(804) 352-8987 

The scene of the surrender of the Confederate Army of Virginia under 

Gen. Robert E. Lee to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865, is 

preserved at Appomattox, ft is a "Living History" area. 

A ramp over the parking area curb provides access to the gravel-on- 
asphalt path to the visitor center about 75 yards (68.58 m) away. Only 
the lower floor of the center — with a manned information desk, sales 
center and historic painting of Lee and Grant— is accessible. Accessible 
restrooms are located behind the Clover Hill Tavern. Visitors may take 
the walking tour of the town, but from two to nine steps at many of the 
historic structures make entry difficult. A wheelchair is available at the 
visitor center and uniformed staff are available to provide any needed 
assistance. Significant features outside the village can be seen by car. 



Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial 

c/o George Washington Memorial Parkway 

Turkey Run Park 

McLean, Virginia 22101 

(703)557-8991 

Telephone at the site: (703) 557-3154 (9:30 to 4:30 October through 

March, 9:30 to 6:00 April through September) 
The antebellum home of the Custis and Lee families, located in Arlington 
National Cemetery, overlooks the Potomac River and Washington, D.C 
This is a "Living History" area. 

A special permit may be obtained for handicapped visitors at the Arling- 
ton National Cemetery visitor center to travel by automobile through the 
grounds of the cemetery to Arlington House. Passengers may get off in 
the circular drive in back of the home. The parking lot is near the old 
cemetery administration building. The walkway from that lot to Arling- 
ton House is steep, and approximately 1/8 mile (0.201 km) long. 



Virginia 1 67 



Entry to the house is through the conservatory over one step at the 
door and four more steps into the mam floor of the house. Advance 
arrangement must be made for assistance over the steps, by calling the 
site telephone number. The second floor is reached by a long flight of 
steep, narrow stairs. The restroom stalls in an outside building are of 
marble and 23 inches (58.42 cm) wide. Accessible and equipped rest- 
rooms are available at the Arlington National Cemetery visitor center. 

The museum (with exhibits) is fully accessible at ground level. 
Interpretive talks and tours are offered in the house. Special tours, 
including the handling of artifacts, can be arranged for visitors with 
visual impairment. Appointments can also be arranged for sign language 
tours. 



Assateague Island National Seashore 

(See Maryland) 



Blue Ridge Parkway 

(See North Carolina) 



Booker T. Washington National Monument 

Route l,Box 195 

Hardy, Virginia 24101 

(703) 721-2094 (Rocky Mount, Virginia) 

This site was the birthplace and childhood home of the famous black 

leader and educator, ft is a "Living Historical Farm " area. 

The visitor center is 150 feet (45.69 m) from the parking lot. Visitor center 
doors open to a 6-foot (1.83 m) width. Restroom doors are 30 inches 
(76.20 cm) wide, booth doors, 24 inches (60.96 cm). Visitor center steps 
to the self-guiding trail have handrails. The picnic area is also accessible. 
Audiovisual programs and interpretive talks are offered in the visitor 
center. Conducted tours are given on request. Visually handicapped 
persons may touch artifacts, tools and farm animals. 



Colonial National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 210 
Yorktown, Virginia 23690 
(804)887-2241 

This park encompasses most of the Jamestown Island site of the first 
permanent English settlement in America; Yorktown, scene of the culmi- 
nating battle of the American Revolution, 1781; the 23-mile (37.01 km) 
parkway connecting these and other colonial sites with Williamsburg,- 
and Cape Henry Memorial, marking approximate site of the first landing 
of the Jamesto wn colonists in 1 607. It is a "Living History " area. 



168 Virginia 



Driving tours at Jamestown and Yorktown make much of the area fully 
accessible to all visitors. Guided tours at both locations are also acces- 
sible. There are wayside exhibits and audio-stations throughout the park. 
Park staff at the Jamestown entrance station or the information desk at 
Yorktown visitor center will provide assistance. Conducted tours for 
special groups can be arranged in advance. 

The visitor centers at Jamestown and Yorktown are fully accessible. 
The restrooms are equipped with doors, into both restrooms and stalls, 
36 inches (91.44 cm) wide. Both visitor centers have museums and 
audiovisual programs. 

An additional attraction is the panoramic view of the fields and river 
from the Yorktown visitor center rooftop which can be reached by two 
flights of steps, one inside the building and the second outside. The 
orientation map on the lower level provides a good impression of the 
rooftop view. 



Cumberland Gap National Historical Park 

(See Kentucky) 



Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields Memorial 
National Military Park 

P.O. Box 679 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

(703)373-4461 

Portions of the major Civil War battlefields of Fredericksburg, Chancel- 

lorsville, The Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Court House, plus Old Salem 

Church, Stonewall Jackson Shrine and Chatham Manor are preserved 

here, ft is a' "Living History" area. 

The ground-level Chancellorsville Visitor Center containing the museum 
is easily accessible as are the restrooms. Designated spaces in the park- 
ing lot are nearest to the visitor center and the curbing has a ramp to the 
sidewalk approach to the center. 

The entry to Fredericksburg Visitor Center, an old Civilian Conser- 
vation Corps visitor center built in the 1930s, has five stone steps to a 
small porch, approximately 9 inches (22.86 cm) high and a high step into 
the building from the porch. The restrooms are on the lower level, down 
two flights of steps, divided by a narrow landing. There is one other 
accessible stall in the old maintenance building behind the visitor center. 
Uniformed personnel are available to assist as needed. 

Self-guiding battlefield tours and wayside exhibits can be seen by 
car. The long, uphill walk to the exhibit shelter on Lee's Hill, Fredericks- 
burg Battlefield, is a series of steep switchbacks with one resting, 
benched area. 



Virginia 1 69 



George Washington Birthplace National Monument 

Washington's Birthplace, Virginia 22575 

(804)224-0196 

As birthplace of the first U.S. President, the park includes a memorial 

house and gardens, and the tombs of Washington's father, grandfather 

and great-grandfather, ft is a "Living Historical Farm " area. 

The birthplace is 38 miles (61.15 km) east of Fredericksburg on Route 
204, off Route 3. The newly constructed visitor center is fully accessible. 
The grounds and farm area are accessible by wheelchair; the grave- 
yard and Potomac River by car. There are three entrance steps to the 
two-story memorial mansion. The flight of steps to the second floor is 
steep and narrow. 



George Washington Memorial Parkway Va.-Md. 
Turkey Run Park 
McLean, Virginia 22101 
(703)557-8991 

This landscaped riverfront parkway links many landmarks m the life 
of George Washington, ft connects Mount Vernon and Great Falls on 
the Virginia side of the Potomac and Great Falls with Cham Bridge on 
the Maryland side. The parkway includes natural, historical and recrea- 
tional areas. 

The areas and facilities under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service 
and the management of the Parkway are treated individually in the 
Virginia section of this book. 

Other than the parkway itself in Maryland, Great Falls Tavern, an 
area until 1 974 managed by George Washington Memorial Parkway, is 
now under the management of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Na- 
tional Historical Park and is included in the description of that park and 
its facilities. 



Great Falls Park 

9200 Old Dominion Drive 

Great Falls, Virginia 22066 

(703)759-2915 

This 800-acre (324 ha) park provides a fine view of the Great Falls of 

the Potomac from the Virginia side of the river. 

The park is located about 15 miles (24 km) from Washington, D.C., one 
mile (1.61 km) off Va. 193. The visitor center is fully accessible with rest- 
rooms redesigned to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. The parking 
lot has designated spaces and a curb ramp. Throughout the park, 
picnic tables have been cut to accommodate wheelchairs. Drinking foun- 
tains are at the proper height. 



170 Virginia 



The visitor center offers audiovisual programs, exhibits and films 
and guided nature walks are given through the park. A new trail leading 
to the falls overlook is fully accessible. The park also has a snackbar, 
hiking trails and permits fishing. Swimming and boating, however, are 
prohibited. 



Jamestown National Historic Site 

c/o Colonial National Historical Park 
P.O. Box 210 
Yorktown, Virginia 23690 
(804)887-2241 

Part of the site of the first permanent English settlement in North America 
(1607) is on the upper end of Jamestown Island, scene of the first repre- 
sentative legislative government on this continent, July 30, 1619. 

The site was designated December 18, 1940. It is owned and adminis- 
tered by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. The 
remainder of the Jamestown site and island are part of Colonial National 
Historical Park. It is an Affiliated Area. 



Manassas National Battlefield Park 

P.O.Box 1830 

Manassas, Virginia 221 10 

(703) 754-7107 or by tie-line from Washington, D.C. 591-3275 

The park is the scene of the two Civil War battles of First and Second 

Manassas, known as Bull Run, on July 21, 1861, and August 28-30, 1862. 

Confederate Gen. Thomas J Jackson acquired his nickname "Stonewall" 

at First Manassas. This is a "Living History" area. 

Manassas is 26 miles (42 km) southwest of Washington, D.C. The visitor 
center/museum is on Va. 234 a mile (1.61 km) from the intersection of 
1-66 and Va. 234. The visitor center has a ramp for access from the bar- 
rier-free parking area. Restrooms, however, are down a double flight 
of stairs. 

Various plans for remodeling the center to provide for accessible 
restrooms are being considered. The building reconstruction will begin 
in 1979. No accessible restrooms are in the park, picnic areas have 
ground-level privies. Information about the nearest accessible restrooms, 
restaurants and lodgings may be obtained at the Virginia Information 
Center on 1-66 near the park entrance. 

There are two self-guiding driving tours through the park and a 
self-guiding walking tour on Henry Hill, scene of heavy fighting. Assis- 
tance may be required on this tour as the slope to Henry Hill is moder- 
ately steep and the trail surface is grass. The first part of the walking 
tour to Stone Bridge is accessible by ramp from the parking lot. Beyond 
the bridge the tour runs for a mile (1.61 km) farther along Bull Run over 
a rugged and narrow trail. 



Virginia 171 



On the park road — New York Avenue — in the area of the New York 
Monuments, markers have raised printing and murals. The grounds of 
Stone House are accessible from the parking area off the park road, but 
access to the Stone House is impeded by three high entrance steps. The 
picnic area is one mile (1.61 km) from the visitor center and accessible 
from the park road. 



Petersburg National Battlefield 

P.O. Box 549 

Petersburg, Virginia 23803 

(804)732-3531 

The Union launched the "Battle of the Crater" here, during a 10-month 

campaign, 1864-65, to seize Petersburg, the railroad center supplying 

Richmond and Gen. Robert E. Lee's army. It is a "Living History" area. 

The visitor center is one-half mile (.80 m) east of the center of Petersburg 
on Route 36. The mam floor of the ground-level museum in the visitor 
center is accessible by ramp. Access to the restrooms in the basement is 
by ramp from an exterior side entrance. Restroom doors are 28 inches 
(71.12 cm) wide and stall doors, 22 inches (55.88 cm). An audiovisual 
map program is frequently presented in the visitor center. A one-way 
4 1/2-mile (7.242 km) self-guiding auto tour of the battlefield starts from 
the visitor center. Pushbutton audio-tapes describe the paintings, focal 
point of the eight wayside exhibits along the auto tour. 



Prince William Forest Park 

P.O. Box 208 

Triangle, Virginia 22172 

(703)221-7181 

In this forested watershed of Quantico Creek, pines and hardwoods 

have replaced worn-out farmland. 

Park headquarters is on the main park road 1 1/4 mile (2.415 km) from 
Va. 619, and about 32 miles (52.0 km) south of Washington, D.C. off 
1-95, near the Quantico Marine Base. The principal information center 
is at the nature center, three miles (4.83 km) farther into the park. The 
visitor center is fully accessible, the nearby parking area is paved, has 
designated spaces and a ramp over the curb. Fully accessible restrooms 
are available in the adjacent campground. The visitor center has printed 
informational materials and exhibits. Some of the artifacts, such as 
animal skulls and fool's gold (pyrite), can be handled. 

Happyland— Cabin Camp 5, one of three types of camping areas 
in the park, is reserved for groups of 50 or more handicapped 
visitors during the summer. Happyland has fully accessible rest- 
rooms in a central location between dormitories, which are them- 



172 Virginia 



selves accessible at ground level. The central dining area has a 
ramp for access through the side door. 

Turkey Run tent camping area is reserved for groups of 10 or 
more visitors. This campground has accessible restrooms with entry 
ramps. The Oak Ridge campground, with accessible restrooms, is 
available for individual campers. Camping arrangements for Happy- 
land and Turkey Run must be made in advance. Oak Ridge is on 
a first-come first-served basis. 

Some trails are negotiable without a problem; others, such as 
those leading down to the creek, are steep, and assistance may be 
needed. Visitors should check at the nature center for maps and 
other information about accessible trails. 



Richmond National Battlefield Park 

32 15 East Broad Street 

Richmond, Virginia 23223 

(804)226-1981 

77775 park commemorates several battles to capture Richmond, the 

Confederate capital, during the Civil War. It is a "Living History" area. 

The park, extending over an area of more than 800 acres (323.7 ha), offers 
self-guided auto-tours of 10 separate areas. The Fort Harrison Visitor 
Center, the Watt House and Garthnght House grounds and interpretive 
exhibits at Cold Harbor and at Malvern Hill are all accessible. Restrooms 
at Cold Harbor and Fort Harrison visitor centers are accessible. The 
restroom at Chimborazo is not. Self-guiding paths at Fort Harrison are 
level and easily traversed by wheelchairs. The parking turnouts provide 
views of Beaver Dam Creek, Forts Johnson, Gregg, Hoke and Gilmer. 



Shenandoah National Park 

Route 4, Box 292 

Luray, Virginia 22835 

(703) 999-2242 

Skyline Drive winds for 105 miles (169.05 km) along the crest of this 

outstanding portion of the Blue Ridge Mountains, through hardwood 

forests and a wealth of wildflowers and wildlife. 

Dickey Ridge and Big Meadows visitor centers, all restaurants, amphi- 
theaters and some lodging units are accessible. The park is open all year. 
Visitors in wheelchairs are advised to make reservations for the acces- 
sible lodging units. All visitor parking lots provide curb ramps. 
Restrooms at Matthews Arm, Big Meadows and Loft Mountain camp- 
grounds are fully accessible for visitors in wheelchairs. Other restroom 
doors range up to 29 inches (73.66 cm). 



Virginia 173 



Exhibits and audiovisual programs are offered in each of the visitor 
centers. Skyline Drive has 75 parking overlooks, 40 of which have inter- 
pretive signs readable from a car. All of the overlook parking areas are 
fully accessible. 



Turkey Run Farm 

McLean, Virginia 22101 

(703)557-1356 

The day-to-day operations of a colonial farm of the 18th century are 

re-enacted m a pleasant, wooded setting here. This is a "Living History" 

area. 

The farm is off Capital Beltway at exit 1 3, on Va. 1 93 east 1 mile (1.61 km), 
left into the farm. An alternative approach is from George Washington 
Memorial Parkway to Va. 123, right fork onto Va. 193, right into the farm. 

The path to the cabin from the parking lot will present difficulties 
for some visitors Visitors in wheelchairs should phone ahead for direc- 
tions by an alternate and shorter pathway through the woods. The cabin 
is entered at ground level. A portable restroom, inaccessible to visitors 
in wheelchairs, is in the parking area. 

The park offers an Environmental Living Program which includes 
classroom study and an overnight experience of colonial life in its many 
aspects at the Environmental Living Center. The park also offers a 
Sensory Program using a basket full of farm products which can be 
seen, smelled, and touched. 



U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial and Netherlands Carillon 

c/o George Washington Memorial Parkway 

Turkey Run Park 

McLean, Virginia 22101 

(703)557-8991 

The memorial also known as the Iwo Jima Memorial, is dedicated to all 

Marines who have died for their country. The 49-bell Netherlands 

Carillon, located nearby, is a symbol of the gratitude of the Dutch people 

to the United States for aid given them during and after World War If. 

The memorial and carillon are located in Arlington, Va., off U.S. 50. The 
walks, memorials and lawn are fully accessible from the parking area. 

During the summer, evening Color Ceremonies, featuring the U.S. 
Marine Drum and Bugle Corps and the Silent Drill team, are held at the 
Marine Memorial. 



174 Virginia 



Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts 

1 55 1 Trap Road 

Vienna, Virginia 22 1 80 

(703)938-3810 

At this first national park for the performing arts, the Filene Center can 

accommodate an audience of 6,500, including 3,000 on the sloping 

lawn m a setting of rolling hills and woods. The stagehouse is 10 stories 

high and the stage 1 00 feet (30. 48 m) wide by 64 feet (1 9. 456 m) deep. 

The summer theater season offers opera, ballet, jazz, pop, symphony, 
musical theater and modern and folk dance. For ticket information call 
938-3800. Special children's programs, four performances daily, are 
provided during the summer. The programs are free but reservations 
must be made. Information and reservation calls for the children's pro- 
grams should be made between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. weekdays to 
938-3810, ext 257. Any expected assistance should be requested then. 

The parking area has designated spaces for visitors in wheelchairs 
and curb cuts and an access ramp at the unloading zone. Park personnel 
provide assistance to the seating areas but arrangements should be 
made in advance. Parking passes also should be obtained by calling 
visitor services in advance. 

The park has eight wheelchairs for loan. Five electric vehicles are 
available for special assistance from the parking lot to the seating area. 
Restrooms are fully accessible and equipped. Dinner is available from 
2 1/2 hours to half an hour before performances nightly, in the buffet 
tent. A portable ramp is available for access to the tent platform, a few 
inches above the grass. Refreshment stands are on either side of the 
entrance to the plaza. 



Virgin Islands 175 



Buck Island Reef National Monument 

c/o Chnstiansted National Historic Site 
P.O.Box 160 

Chnstiansted, Saint Croix, Virgin Islands 00820 
(809)773-1460 

Coral, grottoes, sea fans, gorgonias and tropical fishes— along an under- 
water trail— make this national monument one of the finest marine 
gardens in the Caribbean. The island is a rookery for frigate birds and 
pelicans and the habitat of green turtles. 

Access is by private or charter boat, usually boarded at the Chnstiansted 
wharf, where vehicles can be parked approximately 5 feet (1.52 m) from 
the boats. At Buck Island, visitors must swim or take a small dinghy to 
reach the shore. The primitive trail on the island is considered a "hot" 
hike. The comfort stations are pit toilets. 

The monument is a 5 1/2-mile (8.855 km) sail from Chnstiansted. 



Christiansted National Historic Site 

P.O.Box 160 

Chnstiansted, Virgin Islands 00820 

(809)773-1460 

Colonial development of the Virgin Islands is commemorated by 18th- 

and 19th-century structures in the capital of the former Danish West 

Indies on St. Croix Island. Discovered by Columbus in 1493, St. Croix 

was p urchased by the United Sta tes in 1917. 

The site includes approximately three city blocks on the Chnstiansted 
waterfront. Accessible buildings and areas within the Chnstiansted 
National Historic Site, and the routes to be taken to enter them, are as 
follows: Hamilton Jackson Park and the wharf are accessible from the 
wharf parking area. Scalehouse, from the wharf parking lot, using the 
north main door, the garden walkways at Government House, from King 
Street into the drive between the Bank of America and Government 
House (from the end of this drive there is easy access to the garden 
walkways), Steeple Building from Church Street via the garden and 
through large doors at the rear of the building, Fort Chnstiansvaern, 
drive into the stable area. 

Steep flights of steps lead to the ballroom at Government House and 
to the library in the Old Danish Customs House. At Fort Chnstiansvaern 
six steps lead up to the sallyport, and the sidewalks are worn and uneven 

Excellent restrooms with entry and stall doors 4 feet (1.216 m) wide 
are in Scalehouse and the Old Danish Customs House. Accessible restau- 
rants, lodging and a full range of medical services are available 
in Chnstiansted. 



176 Virgin Islands 



Virgin Islands National Park 

P.O. Box 806 

Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 00801 

(809) 775-2050 (St. Thomas headquarters) 

(809) 776-6201 (Cruz Bay visitor center) 

The park covers about three-fourths of St. John Island and includes 

quiet coves, blue-green waters and white sandy beaches fringed by lush 

green hills. Here, too, are early Canb Indian relics and the remains of 

Danish colonial sugar plantations. 

The park headquarters and visitor center are in Red Hook at the National 
Park Service dock on St. Thomas Island. The single-use restroom has an 
entry door 35 inches (88.90 cm) wide. The ground-level visitor center is 
30 feet (9. 14 m) from the parking lot and 36 feet (10.97 m) from the boat 
dock. Visitors in wheelchairs are assisted on to the ferry for the 20-mmute 
boat ride to St. John Island at the National Park Service dock, and can 
take a taxi for the 1/4 mile (0.4025 km) to the visitor center at Cruz Bay. 
The visitor center is accessible at ground level and single-use restrooms 
have entry doors 36 inches wide. 

Those who wish to camp will find Cinnamon Bay Campground 
(5 miles [8.05 km] from Cruz Bay) easily accessible. Tents and cottages 
with all equipment furnished are for rent and paths lead to most camp- 
sites. Multiple-use restrooms have entry doors 32 inches (8 1 .28 cm) wide. 
Reservations must be made far in advance (but no more than 1 year) 
with the concessioner, Cinnamon Bay Campground, St. John, V.I. 00830. 

Picnic areas at Hawksnest, Trunk Bay and Lameshur Bay are acces- 
sible by car, or path or a combination of the two. The scenic overlooks 
are all reached by car. The Sugar Mill restaurant in Caneel Bay Planta- 
tion is open daily to all visitors without reservations. Non-resident 
visitors with handicaps may request permission and make reservations 
for the restaurant at Caneel Bay Plantation which is generally not open to 
visitors who are not lodgers. Reservations for accessible guest rooms 
should be made well in advance with Caneel Bay Plantation, Cruz Bay, 
St. John, V.I. 00830. 



Washington 177 



Coulee Dam National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 37 

Coulee Dam, Washington 991 16 

(509)633-1360 

Formed by Grand Coulee Dam (part of the Columbia River Basin 

project of the Bureau of Reclamation, Dept. of the Interior), 150-mile 

(241.5 km) long Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake is the principal recreation 

feature here. 

The lower water limits of Roosevelt Lake are at Grand Coulee Dam 
on the Columbia River and at Little Falls Dam on the Spokane River. 
The upper water limits are at Onion Creek and the town of Barstow on 
the Kettle River. 

Information about the entire area is available at the National Recreation 
Area headquarters in Coulee Dam. The Federal building in which the 
headquarters is housed is accessible at ground level in the rear, and in 
the front, over a 6-mch (15.24 cm) step. The restrooms are single rooms 
with 32-inch (8 1 .28 cm) wide entry doors. 

Spring Canyon campground, 4 miles (6.44 km) from headquarters, 
has curb ramps at comfort stations and two restrooms with both entry 
and stall door widths of 36 inches (91.44 cm) and grab bars. The bath- 
house at the beach area, 1/4 mile (4.25 km) from Spring Canyon camp- 
ground, has designated areas in the parking lot, curb ramps and fully 
accessible restrooms. The campground at Keller Ferry, 25 miles 
(40.25 km) from headquarters, has fully accessible restrooms and no 
curbs The Fort Spokane swim beach, 50 miles (80.5 km) from head- 
quarters, has one fully accessible bathhouse. The Fort Spokane visitor 
center is a converted Army guardhouse with a wooden ramp over two 
entry steps and fully accessible restrooms. Information about the re- 
maining less-developed areas may be obtained from park headquarters. 

Audiovisual programs and interpretive talks are offered at all of 
the campgrounds. The drives along the shores of the lake and up the 
rivers offer views of a variety of scenic and cultural features. 

Food and accessible lodgings are available at Coulee Dam, Fort 
Spokane and at Wilbur, on U.S. 2. Hospitals are in Grand Coulee, 5 
miles (8.05 km) from Spring Canyon campground, Davenport, 25 miles 
(40.23 km) from Fort Spokane campground, and Colville, 10 miles 
(16.09 km) from Kettle Falls campground. 



Fort Vancouver National Historic Site 

East Evergreen Boulevard and East Reserve Road 
Vancouver, Washington 98661 
(206)696-4041 

As the western headquarters of the Hudson's Bay Company 1825-49, 
the fort was the hub of trading activities and seat of political and military 
authority for the Pacific Northwest. It was a United States military reserva- 
tion, 1849-1949. This is a "Living History" area. 



178 Washington 



The visitor center is in the same park headquarters building at the Van- 
couver address and the fort is a short distance away. A portable ramp 
is available for use over the three steps leading to the visitor center. The 
new comfort station, one of the reconstructed buildings in the fort, is 
designed for full accessibility of visitors in wheelchairs and has acces- 
sible drinking fountains. The fort area is level; pathways are of grass. 

A Living History program, conducted trips for groups, and ex- 
hibits are available in the fort. Artifacts, furs and reproductions are avail- 
able in both visitor center and the fort and may be handled. 

Restaurants, lodging and medical services are available in Van- 
couver. 



Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park 

(See Alaska) 



Mount Rainier National Park 

Administrative Office: Tahoma Woods, Star Route 

Ashford, Washington 98304 

(206)569-2211 

This greatest single-peak glacial system in the United States, 14,410 feet 

(4,389.29 m) high, radiates from the summit and slopes of an ancient 

volcano, with dense forests and subalpme flowered meadows below. It 

co vers 30sguare miles (77. 71 sq. km). 

The Longmire visitor center is 6 1 miles (98.2 1 km) southeast of Tacoma on 
State Route 7 to Elby, thence by State Route 706 to Longmire. Restrooms 
at the Longmire visitor center are adequate and the center is fully acces- 
sible. Paradise and Ohanapecosh visitor centers are fully accessible and 
the restrooms are designed to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. 

Many features may be viewed by car. The overlooks have easel-type 
interpretive signs, most of which can be read from the car. Evening 
programs are given daily from July 1 through Labor Day at the visitor 
centers. All visitor centers have relief models of Mount Rainier which 
may be touched and felt. 

A few fully accessible guest rooms are available at Paradise Inn on 
the first floor, open from mid-June to Labor Day. Reservations for these 
rooms should be made by contacting Mount Rainier National Park 
Hospitality Service, 4820 South Washington Street, Tacoma, 98409, 
telephone (206) 475-6260. The nearest full range of restaurants, lodgings 
and medical services outside the park will be found in Tacoma. Eleva- 
tion of the roads ranges from 2,000 to 6,400 feet (609.20 to 1,949.44 m). 



Washington 179 



North Cascades National Park and 

Lake Chelan and Ross Lake National Recreation Areas 

800 State Street 

Sedro Woolley, Washington 98284 

High jagged peaks intercept moisture-laden winds, producing glaciers, 

icefalls, waterfalls and other water phenomena in this wild alpine region 

where lush forests and meadows, plant and animal communities thrive 

in the valleys. 

Park headquarters, in Sedro Woolley, manages both the park and the 
recreation areas. The information center in Concrete, 23 miles east of 
Sedro Woolley on State Highway 20, is a joint operation of the National 
Park Service and the Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture. 
The office, off State 20 in the center of Concrete, has fully accessible 
restrooms and exhibits, plus publications and general information. 

Route 20, which traverses the Ross Lake recreation area for about 
25 miles (40.25 km), has many wayside exhibits. At Colonial Creek camp- 
ground, evening camphre programs are given in the amphitheater. The 
campground has fully accessible restrooms and the amphitheater can 
be reached by hard-packed gravel paths. Conducted walks around the 
area are also available, but the self-guiding nature trail is a difficult 
wilderness type trail. 

The Lake Chelan recreation area is accessible only by hiking or a 
55-mile (88.55 km) boat trip from Chelan. Service is provided by Lake 
Chelan Boat Service and Skagit Tours of Seattle City Light. The boats 
are difficult of access, restrooms, doorways and companionways are 
inadequate to accommodate visitors in wheelchairs. 

Food, accessible lodging and a full range of medical services are 
available in Sedro Woolley. 



Olympic National Park 

600 East Park Avenue 
Port Angeles, Washington 98362 
(206)452-9715 

This mountain wilderness contains the finest remnant of Pacific North- 
west ram forest (the only temperate zone ram forest m North America), 
active glaciers, rare Roosevelt elk and 50 miles (80.5 km) of wild, scenic 
ocean shore. 

The mam visitor center for the north and east sections, near park head- 
quarters, is located at 2800 Hurricane Ridge Road, Port Angeles. The 
Port Angeles visitor center and the Hoh Ram Forest visitor center, 
which serves the south and west entry areas, are open all year and are 
fully accessible. The restrooms at the Port Angeles visitor center have 
two entry doors, 31-3/4-inches (80.645 cm) wide and 29-1/2-mches 
(74.93 cm) wide, and the stall doors are 25-1/2-inches (64.77 cm) wide. 
Restroom entry doors at the Hoh Visitor center are 36-inches (91.44 cm) 



180 Washington 



wide and stall doors are 35-inches (88.90 cm) wide. Plans are underway 
to modify the restrooms at the Port Angeles visitor center and to install 
equipment in the Hoh visitor center restrooms. 

Among the many park features to be seen by car are mountain 
scenery from Hurricane Ridge and Obstruction Point, ram forest eco- 
system on Hoh, Queets and Qumault roads, ocean views from Kala- 
loch campground and two other self-guiding overlooks near Kalaloch 
and from LaPush road. All overlooks have interpretive metal photo 
signs, some with relief maps. Guided walks by park naturalists are con- 
ducted on Hurricane Ridge. Gray Line Tours provides summer sight- 
seeing tours to Hurricane Ridge, the ram forest and the Pacific Ocean. 
Illustrated programs are presented at the many campfire circles. All 
visitor centers have push-button audiovisual programs and relief maps 
which may be touched and felt. 

A few fully accessible guest quarters are available in the park. Infor- 
mation about their location is available from park headquarters. A full 
range of medical services and alternative accessible lodging is in Port 
Angeles, north of the park, Aberdeen, to the south, and Forks to the 
west, all on U.S. 101. Elevations range from 5,200 feet (1,583.92 m) at 
Hurricane Ridge to 1,1 10 feet (335.06 m) on U.S. 101. 



San Juan Island National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 549, 228 Spring Street 

Friday Harbor, Washington 98250 

(809)724-1974 

The park commemorates the peaceful relations maintained by the United 

States, Great Britain and Canada since the 1872 boundary dispute here. 

English and United States military campsites are included. This is a 

"Living History" area. 

The park is reached by small aircraft or by a 2-hour ride on Washington 
State ferries from Anacortes. Passengers must mount narrow stairs to 
the upper deck, where all passenger facilities are located, or remain, 
for the duration of the trip, on the automobile transport deck where there 
are no facilities. (Plans are being considered to remedy this situation.) 

Food, lodging and medical services are available in Friday Harbor. 
Reservations should be made well in advance, as accessible facilities 
are few. 

Visitors in wheelchairs, who have brought their own automobiles, 
may drive to the British and American campsites, which are about 1 1 
miles (17.71 km) apart, and park near the restored buildings. 

The barracks house the exhibits. Movies and interpretive talks are 
offered Friday and Saturday evenings. Outside of the buildings, living 
history programs are held during the day. The self-guiding trails and 
pathways present difficulties on account of occasional steep inclines. 



Washington 181 



Restrooms in both camps are adequate-sized privies, in the Ameri- 
can Camp, 25 feet (7.6 m) from the exhibit shelter, and in the English 
Camp, 300 feet (9 1 .2 m) from the barracks. 

The park is open daily from sunrise to sunset from Memorial Day 
through Labor Day. For the balance of the year, the site is open week- 
days only, sunrise to sunset. 



Whitman Mission National Historic Site 

Route 2 

Walla Walla, Washington 99362 

(509) 525-5500 Extension 465 

Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Whitman ministered to the spiritual and physical 

needs of the Indians here until slam by a few of them m 1847. The Mission 

was a landmark on the Oregon Trail. 

The visitor center is 8 miles (12.88 km) west of Walla Walla on U.S. 12. 
The parking lot has designated spaces near the visitor center, which is 
entered at ground level. Restroom entry doors are 30-1/2-mches 
(77.47 cm) wide and stall doors are 23 inches (58.42 cm) wide. 

The self-guiding trail is level and easily negotiated except for the 
500-foot (152.0 m) Shaft Hill (memorial) section, which can be by- 
passed. The trail to the mission and graveyard is level and easily traveled. 
Conducted trips on this trail can be arranged. The trails have push- 
button audiovisual interpretation. A few artifacts outside of the exhibit 
cases in the museum may be touched and felt. Audiovisual programs 
and interpretive talks are given at the visitor center. Living history 
programs are given in the visitor center, and outside, on weekends, in 
accessible areas. 
Food, lodging and medical services are available in Walla Walla. 



182 West Virginia 



Appalachian National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park 

(See Maryland) 



Harpers Ferry National Historical Park Md.-W. Va 

P.O. Box 65 

Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 25425 

(304)535-6371 

Because of its strategic location at the confluence of the Shenandoah 

and Potomac Rivers in the Blue Ridge Mountains, the town of Harpers 

Ferry changed hands many times during the Civil War. John Brown's 

raid took place here in 1859. The site lies in Maryland and West Virginia. 

This is a "Living History" area. 

For the visitor arriving from the East, the visitor center is less than 1 mile 
(1.61 km) off U.S. 340, after a right turn beyond the bridge over the 
Shenandoah River. Visitors in wheelchairs may park in the bus parking 
lot, where a paved path leads to an information kiosk on the same side 
of the street. Assistance will be needed over the 10-inch (25.4 cm) step 
at the entry of the visitor center across the street from the kiosk. 

Assistance also will be needed over the one-step entry to each of 
the 1 1 open buildings in this historic area. The other buildings, under- 
going restoration and now closed to the public, may be seen from the 
street. An orientation audiovisual program is offered in the center. There 
are no adequate or accessible restrooms in the park for visitors in 
wheelchairs. 

Most of the overlooks are on steep trails and difficult of access, but 
some, including Bolivar Heights, are accessible by car. 

The National Park Service has administrative offices at the Harpers 
Ferry Center (Interpretive Design Center) and the Mather Training 
Center — not a part of the park and not open for visitation by the public. 
However, the restrooms in the Harpers Ferry Center are fully accessible 
and equipped and may be used by visitors in wheelchairs during week- 
day business hours when the building is open. 



Wisconsin 183 



Apostle Islands National Lakeshore 

Route l,Box 152 
Bayfield, Wisconsin 54814 
(715)779-3397 

Twenty picturesque wooded islands and an 1 1-nnile (17.71 km) strip of 
adjacent Bayfield Peninsula along the south shore of Lake Superior com- 
prise this northern park characterized by picturesque sand beaches, 
high clay banks and sandstone cliffs. 

The primitive campsites and trails on the islands present difficulties 
because of deep sand, rocky terrain and steep banks. An excursion 
boat plies the islands from Bayfield and Little Sand Bay. Boarding the 
boat will present difficulties and require assistance for some visitors. 
For more information, visitors planning the trip should contact Apostle 
Islands Cruise Service, Box 45, Bayfield. 

The park headquarters is temporarily lodged in an old converted 
summer home, 14 miles north of Bayfield at Little Sand Bay. Entry is by 
three steps and a 32-inch (81 .28 cm) doorway and will require assistance. 
The restroom in the headquarters also is up three steps approximately 
6 feet by 5 feet ( 1 .824 m by 1 .52 m) in size. The parking lot is 50 feet 
(15.23 m) from the headquarters connected by a concrete walkway. No 
other paths or trails in the area are paved. Park headquarters is open all 
year and provides information, maps and pamphlets. 

During the summer months the visitor center and concession facili- 
ties, also at Little Sand Bay, are open. This building also is a converted 
store and residence presenting many of the same difficulties of access, 
except for a ramped entrance. 

An information center in Bayfield, 1 Washington Avenue, off High- 
way 13, is reached by a graveled 80-foot (24.37 m) path leading from 
the parking lot. 

Plans for fully accessible headquarters and visitor center are pro- 
gressing. Visitors should check ahead for the timetable of the new 
development. 



Ice Age National Scientific Reserve 

Division of Tourism and Information, Wisconsin 

Department of Natural Resources, Box 450 

Madison, Wisconsin 53701 

(608)266-7616 

This first national scientific reserve contains nationally significant features 

of continental glaciation. An Affiliated Area. 

State parks in the area are open to the public. 



184 Wisconsin 



St. Croix National Scenic River 
Lower St. Croix National Scenic River 

P.O. Box 708 

St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin 54024 (715) 483-3287 

These two areas include some 200 miles (321.86 km) of the upper reaches 

of the beautiful St. Croix River and its Namekagon tributary and 27 miles 

(43.20 km) of the Lower River, the first, an initial component of the 

National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The 25-mile (40.25 km) portion 

between the Mississippi River and Stillwater (Minn.) is administered by 

the States of Minnesota and Wisconsin. 

The park headquarters is at the corner of Massachusetts and Hamilton 
Streets in St. Croix Falls and is fully accessible as to parking, restrooms, 
water fountains and entry. Maps and interpretive pamphlets and all other 
needed information are available. 

Restaurants, motels and medical facilities are available in St. 
Croix Falls. 

Roads and landings to the river are easily traversed and picnic 
tables are located at most major landings and at county and state areas 
adjacent to the waterway. Some parking lots have been paved, others are 
graveled. Parking lots are 25 feet (7.62 m) or less from the contact sta- 
tions. Contact stations are one-story structures with corridors 40 inches 
(1 m) wide. Restroom doors are 32 inches (81.28 cm) wide; all other 
doors are 36 inches (9 1 .44 cm) wide. 

Recreational opportunities are shore fishing, canoeing, motor- 
boating among others. Canoeists on this somewhat tricky waterway 
should be able to swim. Motorboats are generally in the 20-foot (6.08 m) 
range, with narrow shallow steps. 

Campgrounds with older facilities are in the developmental stage 
in the park area. When fully developed, the park campgrounds will be 
accessible in all respects. 

Nearby State campgrounds may provide more accessible facilities. 
For information about these, and the facilities available in the portion 
administered by the two states, visitors should inquire at the State 
Departments of Natural Resources, St. Paul, Minnesota 55155, and 
Madison, Wisconsin 53702. 



Wyoming 185 



Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area 

(See Montana) 



Devils Tower National Monument 

Devils Tower, Wyoming 827 14 
(307)467-5370 

This 86 5- foot (263.65 m) tower of columnar rock, the remains of a vol- 
canic intrusion, is the Nation 's first national monument. 

The visitor center and the administration building are 28 miles (45.08 km) 
northwest of Sundance off U.S. 14. Visitors in wheelchairs may park 
parallel and next to the curb when getting out of their cars, park person- 
nel will park the cars. Once the curb is negotiated, the visitor center and 
the administration building are accessible from the sidewalk. Visitor 
center restrooms are in the basement, but visitors in wheelchairs may 
use those in the administration building. The restroom entry doors are 
30 inches (76.20 cm) wide and stall doors, 22 inches (55.88 cm). 

Visitors may enjoy by car the prairie dog town, wayside exhibits on 
prairie dog ecology, picnicking and birdwatchmg. The Tower Trail is a 
paved but steep 1 1/2 mile (2.41 km). The trail around the base of the 
tower is steep and rocky. The site of evening campfire talks is accessible 
by paved trails from the picnic area and campground. Audiovisual pro- 
grams and interpretive talks are offered at the visitor center. A small 
model of Devils Tower in the visitor center may be touched by visitors 
with visual impairment. 

The average elevation of main features is 4,260 feet (1,297.60 m). 
The nearest food, lodging and medical facilities are in Sundance. 



Fort Laramie National Historic Site 

Fort Laramie, Wyoming 82212 

(307)837-2704 

A fur-trade post once stood here, but the surviving buildings are those 

of a major military post that guarded covered-wagon trails to the West, 

1834-90. This is a "Living History" area. 

The site is 3 miles (4.83 km) southwest of the town of Fort Laramie. The 
visitor center museum, located in the Subsistence Storehouse, is acces- 
sible. Eight of the original structures are open to the public and of these, 
five can be entered by visitors in wheelchairs without assistance The 
remainder have floors a few inches above ground level. As historic 
buildings these may not be equipped with ramps. Assistance may be 
required for some visitors. Stairways and steep segments of the self- 
guiding trail are provided with handrails. Special conducted tours and 
interpretive talks are given visitors with visual handicaps. On these 
tours, objects are described and visitors are permitted to handle them. 



186 Wyoming 



The nearest restaurants, lodging and medical services are in Guern- 
sey, 13 miles (20.93 km) northwest of Fort Laramie or in Torrington, 20 
miles (32.2 km) southeast of Fort Laramie, both of these on U.S. 26. 



Fossil Butte National Monument 

Kemmerer, Wyoming 83101 
(307) 877-3450 

The monument features some of the world's most numerous, rare, and 
well-preserved fish fossils, 40 to 65 million years old, as well as an abun- 
dance of summer wildflowers and wildlife m this now semiand region. 

The monument is still largely undeveloped with a trailer for visitor 
contact station. Access to the trailer is difficult because of soft gravel 
surrounding the structure. The comfort stations have chemical toilets. 

A dirt road leads into the monument from U.S. 30, 12 miles (19.31 
km) west of Kemmerer. It is passable by automobiles for about 4 miles 
(6.44 km). Pick-up trucks and four-wheel drive vehicles may continue 
on the same road for considerable distances beyond. Elevations vary 
from 7,000 to 8,000 feet (2, 1 32.20 to 2,436.80 m). 

The monument's headquarters is across Highway 189 from 
the Highway Department's Port of Entry, at the south end of Kemmerer. 
Access is at ground level and some restrooms are accessible. Entry door 
widths in both women's and men's restrooms are 28-1/2 inches (72. 
39 cm); stall door width in the women's restroom is 31 inches (78.74 
cm), and in the men's restroom, is 25 inches (63.5 cm). 

Fossils on display in park headquarters may be touched and 
handled by visitors with visual impairment. Other fossils on display in 
the visitor contact station may be handled in the same way. 

Kemmerer has medical services and accommodations but it is a 
boom town, for a number of reasons, and reservations must be made 
well in advance of the visit. Visitors planning trips to the area should 
check with park headquarters for advice and information as to alter- 
natives in less booming areas of the state or nearby states. 



Grand Teton National Park 

P.O. Box 67 

Moose, Wyoming 83012 

(307) 733-2880 

The most impressive part of the Teton Range, this park's series of peaks 

was once a noted landmark of Indians and "Mountain Men. " The park 

includes part of Jackson Hole, winter feeding ground of the country's 

largest elk herd. 

Park headquarters and visitor center are at Moose, 13 miles north of 
Jackson on U.S. 26, 89, 187 and 287. The Moose visitor center and the 
Colter Bay visitor center are fully accessible by ramp from the parking 
areas. 



Wyoming 1 87 



Fully accessible restrooms are in Gros Ventre campground, Moose 
visitor center, Colter Bay visitor center and the Colter Bay campground. 
Evening programs are given at Lizard Creek campfire circle (accessible 
by paved walk); Colter Bay amphitheater (accessible by paved walk with 
curb ramp); and Signal Mountain amphitheater (accessible by paved 
trail). 

The easily accessible Three Senses Nature Trail is available near the 
Colter Bay visitor center. Self-guiding leaflets and tape player guides are 
available from the visitor center to assist with interpretation of the natural 
features of the trail. The trail has guide ropes for visitors with visual 
impairment. 

A plastic relief map of the park is sold at all three visitor centers. 
Many park features, including the valley floor, may be enjoyed by car, 
but interpretive signs and natural and historical features are restricted 
by curbing where visitors in wheelchairs will need assistance. Pamphlets, 
maps and many interpretive programs and aids and exhibits are avail- 
able at the visitor centers. 

The average elevation of mam features of the park is 6,800 feet 
(2,071.28 m). A full range of medical services is available in Jackson. 
Reservations for accessible lodgings should be made with Grand Teton 
Lodge Company, Moran, Wyoming 83013, telephone (307) 543-2811. 
Alternative accommodations and restaurants will be found in Jackson. 



Yellowstone National Park 

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 82 190 
(307)344-7381 

77ws is the world's greatest geyser area, with Old Faithful and some 
3,000 other geysers and hot springs. Here, too, are lakes, waterfalls, 
high mountains and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone — all set apart 
m 1872 as the world's first national park. The park, the largest in the 
National Park System, covers more than 3,400 square miles (5,474 sq. 
km)m Wyoming, Montana and Idaho. 

This magnificent park can be entered from many directions: from the 
north, U.S. 89, from the northeast, U.S. 212, from the east through Cody, 
U.S. 20, 14 and 16, merged, from the south, via the John D. Rockefeller 
Jr. Memorial Parkway, U.S. 89 and U.S. 26, from the west via West 
Yellowstone, US 191 and 287. 

All necessary facilities, restaurants, accessible lodging and medical 
services are within the park Fully accessible restrooms will be found in 
each major center. 

A few of the service centers and facilities to be noted as fully acces- 
sible are: Canyon Visitor Center, Old Faithful Visitor Center, Grant 
Visitor Center, Norns Museum, Bridge Bay multi-purpose building and 
Mammoth Hotel (with elevator). Also accessible are ground-floor rooms 
at the Lake Hotel and Old Faithful Inn, Canyon Village Coffee Shop, 
dining room and cafeteria, Canyon Village General Store lunch counter, 
Fishing Bridge Cafeteria, Fishing Bridge General Store fountain, Lake 
Hotel dining room and Old Faithful Inn Coffee Shop 



188 Wyoming 



Most of the viewpoints, geysers and mud pots are accessible. Those 
not fully accessible without assistance have steps or steep grades or are 
distant from parking areas. The Upper Falls may be viewed from the 
easily accessible Uncle Tom overlook. At Grand View overlook, visitors 
in wheelchairs will need assistance up the moderately steep path to the 
viewpoint, but there are no steps. More than 30 accessible wayside inter- 
pretive exhibits are located along the park roads. Roadside radio trans- 
mitters provide short taped messages. Car radios should be tuned to 
1606 wherever signs indicating message transmissions are seen along 
the road. The range is 1/2 mile (.805 km) from the transmission point. 

All visitors will enjoy the famous Three Senses Nature Trail in the 
Firehole Lake thermal basin area, although visitors in wheelchairs will 
find easier going on the nearby boardwalk trail, in the Firehole Lake 
area. The Three Senses Nature trail is 1/8 mile (0.20 km) of uneven, hard- 
packed earth, with 1 6 labels in Braille mounted on posts which are linked 
by a cord for tracking from one label to the next. The printed text is 
also available for sighted visitors. The trail was selected because of the 
large variety of smells, sounds and textures of natural objects found 
along it. 

Audiovisual programs are offered at the Old Faithful, Grant and 
Canyon Visitor Centers and campfire programs at Fishing Bridge, 
Canyon, Madison Junction, Mammoth, Bridge Bay and Tower Fall 
amphitheaters. 

Accessible lodgings should be reserved with Yellowstone Park 
Company, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 82190, telephone (307) 
344-7321. 

Elevations along the mam park roads range from 6,000 to 8,000 
feet (1,827.60 to 2,436.80 m). The average elevation of mam features is 
7,000 feet (2,132.20 m). There is a medical clinic at Mammoth Hot 
Springs, a dispensary at Old Faithful and a hospital at Lake. 



Regional Maps 



Abbreviations 


NP 


National Park 


NS 


National Seashore 


NL 


National Lakeshore 


NM 


National Monument 


NHS 


National Historic Site 


NHP 


National Historical Park 


NMP 


National Military Park 


NMEM 


National Memorial 


NMEMP 


National Memorial Park 


NB 


National Battlefield 


NBS 


National Battlefield Site 


NBP 


National Battlefield Park 


NSR 


National Scenic River or Riverways 


NR 


National River 


NRA 


National Recreation Area 



North Atlantic Regional Office 

National Park Service 

1 5 State Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

(617)223-3793 

Mid-Atlantic Regional Office 

National Park Service 
143 South Third Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106 
(215)597-7054 

National Capital Regional Office 

National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Drive, SW 
Washington, DC 20242 
(202) 426-6700 

Southeast Regional Office 

National Park Service 
1895 Phoenix Blvd. 
Atlanta, Georgia 30349 
(404) 996-2520 

Midwest Regional Office 

National Park Service 
1709 Jackson Street 
Omaha, Nebraska 68102 
(402)221-3472 



Rocky Mountain Regional Office 

National Park Service 
655 Parfet Street 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, Colorado 80225 
(303) 234-3095 

Southwest Regional Office 

National Park Service 
P.O. Box 728 

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 
(505) 988-6375 

Western Regional Office 

National Park Service 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

Box 36063 

San Francisco, California 94102 

(415)556-5186 

Pacific Northwest Regional Office 

National Park Service 
601 Fourth and Pike Building 
Seattle, Washington 98101 
(206) 442-4830 



189 






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Your Comments Are Welcome . . . 



Facilities, services and interpretive programs are in a continual process 
of modification and improvement throughout the National Park System. 
Your comments on how well your needs have been met, and your sug- 
gestions for improvement of this handbook and of facilities, services 
and programs, will be welcome, and of great assistance to us. 

Please send your comments and suggestions to: 

"Access National Parks" 
Office of Communications 
National Park Service 
U.S. Department of the Interior 
Washington, DC 20240 



197 



As the Nation's principal conservation agency, the Department of the 
Interior has responsibility for most of our nationally owned public lands 
and natural resources. This includes fostering the wisest use of our land 
and water resources, protecting our fish and wildlife, preserving the 
environmental and cultural values of our national parks and historical 
places, and providing for the enjoyment of life through the outdoor 
recreation. The Department assesses our energy and mineral resources 
and works to assure that their development is in the best interests of all 
our people. The Department also has a major responsibility for Ameri- 
can Indian reservation communities and for people who live in Island 
Territories under U.S. administration. 

NPS 188 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1978 0-250-167 



General Information viii 
Key to Sites x 
Regional Maps 189 

Your Comments ... 197 



Alabama 1 
Alaska 3 
Arizona 7 
Arkansas 18 
California 21 
Colorado 31 
Connecticut 37 
District of Columbia 37 
Florida 47 
Georgia 54 
Hawaii 58 
Idaho 61 
Illinois 62 
Indiana 63 
Iowa 65 
Kansas 66 
Kentucky 67 
Louisiana 69 
Maine 70 
Maryland 72 
Massachusetts 81 
Michigan 87 
Minnesota 89 



Mississippi 91 
Missouri 93 
Montana 95 
Nebraska 98 
Nevada 100 
New Hampshire 102 
New Jersey 103 
New Mexico 105 
New York 1 1 1 
North Carolina 118 
North Dakota 124 
Ohio 126 
Oklahoma 128 
Oregon 129 
Pennsylvania 132 
Puerto Rico 141 
Rhode Island 142 
South Carolina 143 
South Dakota 146 
Tennessee 149 
Texas 153 
Utah 159 
Vermont 166 
Virginia 166 
Virgin Islands 175 
Washington 177 
West Virginia 182 
Wisconsin 183 
Wyoming 185